Frank l

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Feb 15, 2007
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Hi, I was just curious if attending residency is required in order to practice as a GP?
You can work as a GP after you do a 1 year rotating internship after you finish medical school.
This is hardly ever done anymore. Most people who do it now are in the military.
And GP does not = family practice. Family practice is 3 years of residency.
I'm not sure what the limitations are for a GP, but I would guess they can do less than an FP, so.....why would you want to go all the way through med school and then not be able to do stuff?
 

DrMidlife

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Oct 30, 2006
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If you can find a copy of Iserson's guide to residency, there's a table in there with state-by-state requirements, which vary quite a bit. Some states require 3 years post-medschool to be licensed. And there are those 5 states that require a DO traditional rotation no matter what.
 

scpod

Moderator Emeritus
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Oct 13, 2005
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In theory, you could practice as a GP after a year of internship in half of the US states. However, getting hospital admitting privaledges or malpractice insurance would be just about impossible. Becoming part of a group practice is highly unlikely as well.
 

Seneca20

Gig'em Aggies!!
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Dec 12, 2007
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It is approximately 85% of hospitals nationwide that have ammended bylaws to require that physicians have the ability to sit for Board Examination (a few years ago we would have simply said Board Eligible, however all the Boards have "officially" done away with the term) in a given specialty to be eligible for hospital privileges. The remaining 15% or so are extremely rural locations, some critical access hospitals, etc. Bottom line GP = Dead End. If you've finished 4 yrs Med School, and 1 year internship, either finish out the required Residency period or don't practice medicine. There are other avenues, research, Pharma Companies. . . . .
 

Non-TradTulsa

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Agree with Seneca. In addition to having a lot of trouble getting hospital priveleges in any semi-urban hospital, you would also be ineligible for about 95% of managed care contracts that I have seen. It's legal in a number of states to practice after a 1 year internship, but it's also legal in most of those same states to practice surgery even if you're a primary care doctor, since medical specialties aren't recognized in the law. It may be legal, but it isn't right. As complex as medicine is now, I think going into practice after a one-year internship would certainly be ethically questionable.
 

studentDO

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Mar 25, 2008
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Agree with Seneca. In addition to having a lot of trouble getting hospital priveleges in any semi-urban hospital, you would also be ineligible for about 95% of managed care contracts that I have seen. It's legal in a number of states to practice after a 1 year internship, but it's also legal in most of those same states to practice surgery even if you're a primary care doctor, since medical specialties aren't recognized in the law. It may be legal, but it isn't right. As complex as medicine is now, I think going into practice after a one-year internship would certainly be ethically questionable.
How about moonlighting?
 

KateGia

OMS-III
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I'm curious if the OP is premed? If so, what is the reason for asking this question? Why would anyone go through the hell that is medical school, just to cop out at the end?
 

nebrfan

Rx Beer
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May 11, 2005
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Just go the DNP route! They claim they can teach-ya-up everything you need to know for independent practice via online classes. No need for patho-phys, that just bogs stuff down. A cookbook is where its at. :rolleyes: