Oct 23, 2014
30
1
I'm currently living in Ontario and looking to apply to a US school for PharmD. I'm hoping to practice there and I'm interested in the residencies also. I've read that it is difficult to get into a residency being an international student. Just wondering if anyone that's already there has any pointers or advice.
 

Digsbe

7+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2011
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Pharmacist
If you graduate from a US PharmD program it shouldn't be any more difficult since you technically aren't an "international graduate." The only thing you may run into is that I believe VA residencies require you to be a US citizen, so a student visa or permanent resident won't cut it. Apart from that though you should be able to do a residency anywhere else. With a US PharmD you'd have to do a 12 week internship in Canada to be eligible for licensure if you chose to move back home as well as passing Canadian boards since there is no reciprocation.

I considered doing the opposite, I loved Toronto and Canada in general and considered moving there after graduating with a US PharmD (American citizen), but the pay difference sucks so that probably won't happen as long as I have loans.
 
OP
B
Oct 23, 2014
30
1
If you graduate from a US PharmD program it shouldn't be any more difficult since you technically aren't an "international graduate." The only thing you may run into is that I believe VA residencies require you to be a US citizen, so a student visa or permanent resident won't cut it. Apart from that though you should be able to do a residency anywhere else. With a US PharmD you'd have to do a 12 week internship in Canada to be eligible for licensure if you chose to move back home as well as passing Canadian boards since there is no reciprocation.

I considered doing the opposite, I loved Toronto and Canada in general and considered moving there after graduating with a US PharmD (American citizen), but the pay difference sucks so that probably won't happen as long as I have loans.
I've read that as Canadians, we are still considered "international" and therefore need to be sponsored for the residency programs. Since they are more competitive, some won't even take international applicants. :(

The job market for pharm in Toronto is not good. A few of my friends have graduated here and they had to take several part time shifts or move further north to find jobs
 

Digsbe

7+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2011
1,368
994
Status
Pharmacist
I've read that as Canadians, we are still considered "international" and therefore need to be sponsored for the residency programs. Since they are more competitive, some won't even take international applicants. :(

The job market for pharm in Toronto is not good. A few of my friends have graduated here and they had to take several part time shifts or move further north to find jobs
I was told that Canada is swapping to complete PharmD by 2020 and that having one makes you much more competitive, but either way the pay is significantly lower, and with loans I probably couldn't consider moving for several years.

You would be international as an individual, but as far as education is concerned with your PharmD from a US school you shouldn't be disadvantaged when it comes to them evaluating your education. The issue would be possibly be with getting permanent resident status (green card) giving you the right to stay and work in the US. If you have family that are US citizens you could have them sponsor you, or you could marry an American. I know when it comes to America and Canada there may be special agreements for resident status as I know we have extended visas compared to people from other countries, you may want to consult a US immigration lawyer to see what your options are since there may be some kind of trade or other agreement when it comes to Canadians (like NAFTA provisions, etc).
 
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fewaopi

10+ Year Member
Jan 9, 2009
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Pharmacist
I don't know about residencies but you're right in that Canadians are still considered internationals and you need a sponsor visa to work in the US. I've heard depending on the job market in the area, some pharmacies may or may not sponsor a TN visa. So yes you'd be less competitive for retail and I'd imagine for residency as well but not as much as H1B so I've heard
 
T

torontopharm

You'll be considered international from what i know, limiting your options severely when applying for residency. I'd only do this if you were passionate about Pharmacy and if you were in the process of getting your green card/US citizenship etc. You don't wanna finish your degree and not able to get a job or residency in the states. It'd be difficult paying off US pharmacy school tuition with a Canadian pharmacist's salary.
On the bright side, if you do decide to return to Canada you don't have to take the "Equivalency exam" and can move straight on to other PEBC exams.