Mar 18, 2010
3
0
0
Status
Non-Student
I am currently in law enforcement and have been for the last 7 years. The PT field has always interested me, however during my undergrad years I wanted the easy way out and graduated with a Bach. of Liberal Studies. The only lab sciences I took were Geology classes. I realize I will need to complete the science prerequisites that are required for whatever school I apply. My GPA after graduation was a 3.19. One of my problems now is that I have no observation or volunteer hours in the PT or exercise science setting. I guess I need to get on those. My schedule is screwy with work as I rotate shifts throughout the month so trying to get those science classes completed may be tough, but I can get them done. I am burned out in my current field and have always had that desire to be a PT (or at least I believe I did). Another issue I have is I am limited to what it appears as 2 schools due to not being able to move because of my wife's job. How competitive is PT school to get in to? Also is it worth the change at 28 years old? Any advice guys?
 
Aug 13, 2009
21
0
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
PT school is competitive to get into, but it's a sliding scale, of course. It's not as competitive as, say, med school, but it can be formidable all the same. My GPA was so-so (3.3), but I rocked all my pre-reqs (and apparently that carries a lot of weight), got a decent GRE score, and got into the majority of schools I applied to. I only had about 45 hours of observation experience, but I think I got lucky on that. I would get as much exposure as you can without burning yourself out or sacrificing your grades.

"Is it worth the change at 28 years old?"

You say 28 like it's ancient. I don't know what the forecast is for being a cop (are the pensions still as good as they used to be?), but PT is a field where you can pretty much find a job anywhere in the country, and you can work as many as hours as you want (a lot of new parents, for instance, work on a per diem basis and only clock around 10 hours a week. FYI, I've seen PRN rates go as high as $65/hr for less desirable areas). Making a career change is only going to get more difficult as you get older, so now's the time. If you're really serious, I would do a little more research about the field and get some experience talking to PTs in clinics and seeing how they operate on a day-to-day basis.

For the sake of full disclosure, I'm a student, not a PT, so I'm counting on actual PTs to swoop in here and correct me if I'm wrong.

Politically, a lot stands to change with healthcare (anyone else terrified by being beholden to insurance companies and their plummeting reimbursement rates?), but the bottom line is, there will always be a place for physical therapists in the job market. I have a feeling our salaries are going to fluctuate over the next few years (and not always positively), but most PTs in the field now seem to think the future is bright. If the APTA can get their **** together and really start making the case for how rehab (and prehab) can drastically lower the cost of healthcare in this country, then maybe fortune will shine down on all of us.

Anyway, best of luck to you, man, whatever you decide to do. If you have questions, feel free to PM me.
 
Mar 8, 2010
32
1
41
Madison, WI
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Just to chime in. I just turned 35 and will be starting PT school either this summer or fall, depending on which program I decide on. At 28, you're not old at all, and I'd highly encourage you to further look into PT. Sounds as if I was kind of in a similar situation as you. While in college, I majored in biology, and was interested in becoming a PT...had several hundred hours of inpatient volunteer work already under my belt. However, I was presented with an opportunity to work at Morgan Stanley right after graduation. The salary and possible bonuses made it impossible for me to turn down. Fast forward ten years, I was still working in finance as an equity analyst, and was absolutely miserable........LONG days and no weekends off were beginning to wear down on me. Anyway, I suffered an injury to my right ankle, and was really inspired by my PT to explore PT as a career. So, I ended up making the decision to finish up a few prerequisites and apply. Despite being broke now, I'm really happy with my decision and never look back to my days on Wall Street.

Given that you do well on your prerequisites and GRE, you'll be a competitive candidate. I applied with an overall GPA of slightly above 3.2 and a solid GRE score, and was accepted by two of my top choices.

Just by joining the forum and posting, you've made a big step forward. Take your time, try to get some experience in a clinical setting (highly suggest inpatient), and maybe take an anatomy course...this will definitely give you a much better idea of whether PT would be right for you. If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.
 

wrennywren

7+ Year Member
Feb 6, 2010
159
35
161
Status
Rehab Sci Student
I am 32, had horrific grades in college, went back to take science pre req's 2 years ago (got a 3.9 in those classes). I was (and am) only able to apply to one school (only one in the state). I got an interview and was put on the alternate list. Even with my crappy grades and limited hours, I was qualified enough to get into a school. I still have a shot this year, but who knows. I say go for it. Get good pre req grades and you will be fine.
 
Mar 18, 2010
3
0
0
Status
Non-Student
Thanks for the information guys and I will definitely take any more that ya'll may have. I was not referring to 28 as old, but when it comes to completely stopping work and relying on one salary it is a big jump. Also it will prob be closer to 30 before I can actually apply because I believe I have 8 sciences to take prior to being able to apply, plus the GRE. I am not able to quit work until those are done, therefore I will be trying to take those while working shift work, which may be tough but I can do it. I don't necessarily test well but am hoping with some prep work I can perform fairly well on the GRE. The two schools that are my only options are the Medical College of Georgia and the University of South Carolina (the Columbia campus and not the med. univ. in Charleston). How do admissions committees view people with work experience in other fields? Also it appears the overall stress level is fairly low in this field over time. Is that true. Any other information or advice you may have would be great. Thanks
 
Feb 2, 2010
55
0
41
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
None of what you said should be holding you back, although it may take some long term planning to get your pre-reqs done, and to get some observation hours.

I'll be 40 soon, and I'm looking to change from being an architect to a physical therapist. I'm planning to apply this Fall for school in 2011 (still figuring out where to apply).

I don't know where you live, but the community colleges here offer classes mornings, afternoons, evenings and weekends.

It seems most hospitals provide volunteer/observation hours weekdays during the day but there are exceptions. Outpatient clinics, especially independently run, should have some evening and weekend availability.

I'm assuming it will take at least a year to get your pre-reqs done. If you start 3-4 hours a week now, you'll have plenty before you apply. I just started mine in March, and plan to have around 200 hours by the Fall. Even if you're planning to submit your application this Fall, you can get a reasonable amount of hours.

Most schools do not require 100s or 1000s of hours like some applicants on here have. They mostly want to see that you have a 'taste' of the profession so you know what you're getting into. For most schools 40-60 hours is sufficient. For some even less. Some even don't have a minimum stated. It should be easy to find out for the 2 schools you want to apply to (check their websites).

Admission to DPT programs is competitive, but I don't think nearly as much so as it is portrayed. There are plenty of statistics you can look at, especially at
www.apta.org and
www.ptcas.org
and the websites of the schools you'll apply to.

Most of the top programs state that the average for accepted students is GPA 3.3-3.6 and GRE's around 1150. And those are the top programs. Don't get me wrong, those are good numbers, but not everyone has a 4.0 or perfect GRE's. Your GPA isn't quite in that range, but it's not bad. And remember, if the average GPA is 3.3 or 3.4 or whatever, that means roughly half the students had GPA's that are lower. Most schools require a minimum GPA OF 3.0 which you have. But even some schools, including top rated USC, consider applicants with less than a 3.0.

And acceptance rates are not astronomically low. Top notch programs like Northwestern and USC, say they 'enroll' 33% of qualified students. So, they likely accepted much more than that. NYU says 60% of students are admitted.

www.gre.org has practice exams so you can get an idea of what your scores will look like. And it'll help you see if you want to put some effort into studying/preparation before you take the actual exam.

I think your background in law enforcement will be very interesting to a lot of application committees. You have a decent foundation to work with. If you plan well from here on out regarding your pre-reqs and observation hours, I think your chances are very good.

Good luck!
 
Sep 7, 2009
47
2
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I just have to weigh in because I'm a big advocate for career changes! I'll be almost 38 when I start OT school in the Fall, and am giving up a very nice salary (not to mention all the vacation time) as a 13-year teacher to go back to school full time for 2+ years. (I was pretty sure I wanted to do PT but ended up liking a lot about OT, just to explain my screen name.) I took chemistry on Saturdays last semester and am taking Anat/Phys 2 nights a week now, still working full time and tutoring for extra $$. I'm taking pre-req's at a community college and not finding it overly difficult, maybe because I'm interested in the subject matter. I was a psych major with very little chem/bio background, and a not-so-hot undergrad gpa. PT and OT programs are very competetive, but they really like applicants who have lots of life/work experience, even if it's not related to the field. I say go for it! You won't regret it. I have heard nothing but positive things from all the people I know in the physical rehab field. I also wanted to add it took me a good 5 years just to take that first step to take chem (I needed an intro class before I could take any bio's at my particular comm. college). And once I did it I realized how ridiculous it was for me to have waited! The semesters go by so fast and you just adapt to the schedule. If you believe you can do it, you can. Good luck!
 
Jan 28, 2010
24
0
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Thanks for the information guys and I will definitely take any more that ya'll may have. I was not referring to 28 as old, but when it comes to completely stopping work and relying on one salary it is a big jump. Also it will prob be closer to 30 before I can actually apply because I believe I have 8 sciences to take prior to being able to apply, plus the GRE. I am not able to quit work until those are done, therefore I will be trying to take those while working shift work, which may be tough but I can do it. I don't necessarily test well but am hoping with some prep work I can perform fairly well on the GRE. The two schools that are my only options are the Medical College of Georgia and the University of South Carolina (the Columbia campus and not the med. univ. in Charleston). How do admissions committees view people with work experience in other fields? Also it appears the overall stress level is fairly low in this field over time. Is that true. Any other information or advice you may have would be great. Thanks
I'm turning 34 next week and will be starting PT school this fall. I had a below 3.0 college GPA and an even worse science GPA in college. I went on to law school for some unknown reason and practiced law for 6 years. I left the law 2 years ago to do my science prereqs and take some other classes I didn't do in undergrad. I could have kept working since the post-bacc program I was in held all its classes at night. However, as a lawyer, I often worked many late nights and weekends and would have had to miss class often because of it. I also was so miserable and stressed all the time, I was just ready to be done with my legal career. It was tough going from a 2-income family to 1-income with a mortgage and a baby on the way, but my husband was very supportive. Yes, we had to make some sacrifices, but leaving my job improved my (and my family's) quality of life immensely and allowed me to get a 3.8 post-bacc GPA. I also did very well on my GRE.

I applied to 8 schools, got rejected by all the lower ranked and non-ranked schools and accepted to all the top 30 schools I applied to except for 1. Personally, I think my experience went a long way with admissions committees. In my interviews, I was able to give them good, solid examples of leadership, my relationships with clients (including educating and counseling them), working independently and collaboratively, problem solving, and facing difficult challenges which I worked through...all of which occurred in the real world setting and workplace, not just school. I think also as a career changer, you can show admissions that you have done a lot of soul searching to determine what you really want to do since leaving financial stability is not an easy decision.
 
Sep 7, 2009
47
2
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Also, I highly recommend going to information sessions at the schools you'd like to apply to, because it shows your interest level and gives you a chance to meet some of the faculty members, often the ones who help make admissions decisions. Usually these sessions have Q&A time, where you can ask questions specific to your situation ("Given my background, how can I improve my chances of getting in to your program?"). They are usually very helpful in trying to assist you in locating places to observe if you have a tricky schedule, too. At least, that was the experience I had. If nothing else, attending an info session puts your name and face out there and I think can only help.
 
Mar 18, 2010
3
0
0
Status
Non-Student
Phatmomma-thanks for the advice along with Teacher2PT. I am going to do some more research but I'm all but certain I will begin becoming prepared for PT school in the near future. I actually enrolled in law school this past fall, however withdrew after the first day of classes (was able to get everything back thankfully) due to some family issues and not being able to live away from my family (I realized that after I was enrolled and banked on getting into a program I could commute, however I did not get accepted so I had to take the school that I got accepted to). As I said my testing scores never seem to be great. I had a 156 on the LSAT both times I took it, but I'm hoping for a better GRE score. I am thankful at this point that I did not continue with the law school route, as I know so many attorneys that are miserable. I do know many happy ones, however I seem to find more miserable ones. Thanks for your help again guys.
 
Jul 30, 2009
132
0
0
New York, NY
Status
Rehab Sci Student
You're young! Go for it! Do more exploration and pursue this path, if that's what you want. I have an undergrad of only 3.1ish in dance, but pulled about a 3.6 in grad school and now a 3.9 in my post-bac coursework. I got over an 1100 on the GREs, which was competitive. Although I was scared to death about getting into PT school, I got into most of the schools I applied to, including some high ranked programs. Oh, and I'll be 36 when I start. :)

I found that my 10 years as an administrator in the not-for-profit sector and extracurricular activities made me stand out in a good way. Use that to your advantage. Real life experience does count for something when applying to graduate school. Good luck!
 
Apr 28, 2010
1
0
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I am brand new to this website and must say that this is the most inspiring batch of posts that I've read yet! Great work by all of you that have decided to make a change! I am 32 and will be 33 by the time I start a DPT program (provided of course that I get accepted). My undergrad degree is in Finance. Like a lot of other 19-21 year old people, I did not think beyond the horizon of graduating with my BA and then getting a job. Finance was an exciting and well-paying field in the late 90s and early 2000s, so I did not do as well as I could have in undergrad. I graduated with a 3.2, went to work and have spent the past 8 years in commercial real estate. The past few years have been absolute hell. Its not just that the market is in turmoil, its that I have no passion whatsoever for the work. Finally, after a long time of soul searching, I decided on pursing a degree in physical therapy this past September. I am 4/9 done with prerequisite courses (have a 4.0 so far) and am volunteering at a hospital rehab clinic. I'll have 125 hours or so by the end of June.

I'd like to point out a couple things I was told by admissions counselors from a couple of the schools I am targeting. One in particular said they give special consideration to second careers. Another quoted me their average GPA's and then said that the last 60 hours is what is looked at the most.

When I first began looking around at some of the forums, I was a bit awestruck at some of the very high GPA's, test scores and numbers of hours. However, after reading some of the posts here about others making mid-life career changes and remembering the positive reception I got while meeting with these admissions counselors, I feel much better about what I am trying to do. I won't have a 3.9 GPA, 800 hours of experience or a 1400 GRE. With work, a family and trying to accomplish all of this in a little over a year, it just won't be possible. But I will leave nothing on the table this time. I will do as well as I possibly can in class. I will fulfill every prerequisite. I have strong conviction for going into this field and believe I will demonstrate that convincingly when I interview. I hope it is enough to be admitted next year. Good luck to all of us!
 
Sep 8, 2009
103
0
0
Virginia
Status
Rehab Sci Student
I am brand new to this website and must say that this is the most inspiring batch of posts that I've read yet! Great work by all of you that have decided to make a change! I am 32 and will be 33 by the time I start a DPT program (provided of course that I get accepted). My undergrad degree is in Finance. Like a lot of other 19-21 year old people, I did not think beyond the horizon of graduating with my BA and then getting a job. Finance was an exciting and well-paying field in the late 90s and early 2000s, so I did not do as well as I could have in undergrad. I graduated with a 3.2, went to work and have spent the past 8 years in commercial real estate. The past few years have been absolute hell. Its not just that the market is in turmoil, its that I have no passion whatsoever for the work. Finally, after a long time of soul searching, I decided on pursing a degree in physical therapy this past September. I am 4/9 done with prerequisite courses (have a 4.0 so far) and am volunteering at a hospital rehab clinic. I'll have 125 hours or so by the end of June.

I'd like to point out a couple things I was told by admissions counselors from a couple of the schools I am targeting. One in particular said they give special consideration to second careers. Another quoted me their average GPA's and then said that the last 60 hours is what is looked at the most.

When I first began looking around at some of the forums, I was a bit awestruck at some of the very high GPA's, test scores and numbers of hours. However, after reading some of the posts here about others making mid-life career changes and remembering the positive reception I got while meeting with these admissions counselors, I feel much better about what I am trying to do. I won't have a 3.9 GPA, 800 hours of experience or a 1400 GRE. With work, a family and trying to accomplish all of this in a little over a year, it just won't be possible. But I will leave nothing on the table this time. I will do as well as I possibly can in class. I will fulfill every prerequisite. I have strong conviction for going into this field and believe I will demonstrate that convincingly when I interview. I hope it is enough to be admitted next year. Good luck to all of us!

Posts like this brighten my day! Way to go on the switch, and I agree with everything you posted. I'm finishing up pre-req's with several finance majors chaning it up later on in the game. And yes, it will shine just as much in the admissions process when you show you're this hungry to do what you love. BTW, I'm 31, and I feel that it was actually a leg-up to be more mature than some of the other applicants, especially during interviews (life experience should NEVER be ruled out)...Good luck!!!
 
Jul 15, 2010
2
0
0
Philadelphia, PA
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Before I was Pre-Dental and I changed recently to Pre-Physical Therapy. I am pretty much done with required classes and here are the grades:

Anatomy 1 = B
Anatomy 2 = taking it in Fall
Biology 1 = A
Biology 2 = A-
Gen Chem 1 = B+
Gen Chem 2 = B
Calc 1 = B-
Calc 2 = C+
Social Psyc = B-
Statistics = Taking it in Fall
Physics = Taking it in Fall
Nutrition = Taking it in Fall
Organic Chemistry 1 & 2 = B-
Human Population Genetics = A-
Medical Terminology = C+

With other classes and etc. My Cumulative GPA is 3.1

My Plan was to apply this year for Fall 2011 Entry to DPT but I feel like I am behind...and I don't have the entire application ready.

I recently started volunteering this summer at hospital in outpatient setting, total hours so far 21 hrs. Plus, I haven't started studying for GRE at all. I am graduating this December with a BS in Anthropology & Human Biology. Then study for GRE from January - March (I don't know how much time to spend studying) during that time, I will also gather my Personal Essay, Recommendation letter, build my volunteering hours. Then apply next July 15th 2011 for Fall 2012 entry.

I do not know if this is smart or not b/c I will be wasting an entire year. I know I should of planned accordingly but its life, things happened which made me change my career path....

My concern is, should I take the chance and risk applying this year and finish my "application" in a rush? I also haven't researched many DPT programs....I want to stay in Northeast part of US as i've been raised in MD and PA area, so if there is any suggestion with school/program I will gladly take your recommendation.

Thanks!:)
 
Feb 2, 2010
55
0
41
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Before I was Pre-Dental and I changed recently to Pre-Physical Therapy. I am pretty much done with required classes and here are the grades:

Anatomy 1 = B
Anatomy 2 = taking it in Fall
Biology 1 = A
Biology 2 = A-
Gen Chem 1 = B+
Gen Chem 2 = B
Calc 1 = B-
Calc 2 = C+
Social Psyc = B-
Statistics = Taking it in Fall
Physics = Taking it in Fall
Nutrition = Taking it in Fall
Organic Chemistry 1 & 2 = B-
Human Population Genetics = A-
Medical Terminology = C+

With other classes and etc. My Cumulative GPA is 3.1

My Plan was to apply this year for Fall 2011 Entry to DPT but I feel like I am behind...and I don't have the entire application ready.

I recently started volunteering this summer at hospital in outpatient setting, total hours so far 21 hrs. Plus, I haven't started studying for GRE at all. I am graduating this December with a BS in Anthropology & Human Biology. Then study for GRE from January - March (I don't know how much time to spend studying) during that time, I will also gather my Personal Essay, Recommendation letter, build my volunteering hours. Then apply next July 15th 2011 for Fall 2012 entry.

I do not know if this is smart or not b/c I will be wasting an entire year. I know I should of planned accordingly but its life, things happened which made me change my career path....

My concern is, should I take the chance and risk applying this year and finish my "application" in a rush? I also haven't researched many DPT programs....I want to stay in Northeast part of US as i've been raised in MD and PA area, so if there is any suggestion with school/program I will gladly take your recommendation.

Thanks!:)
Doesn't sound like you are behind at all. Many DPT applicants are probably jealous of how 'ahead' of them you are.

You have most of the pre-reqs. The remaining you can easily finish before Summer or Fall of 2011.

You've started your volunteer hours already. Most programs don't require more than 40 or so hours. You're half done with that.

The biggest thing you need now is the GRE which you can schedule anytime.

I think it would be to your benefit to apply this Fall. If you apply to several programs (and there are at least 8 in Pennsylvania) you have a decent chance of being accepted.

The worst case scenario is you don't get accepted and reapply the following year. In which case, I think most schools look favorably on re-applicants if they've shown an effort at improving their application. And most programs will take the highest of your individual GRE scores if you end up wanting to take those again.

Seems like you have little to lose, but much to gain if you apply this cycle.

Good luck with whatever you decide!!!
 

jbizzle

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 19, 2008
811
28
101
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Before I was Pre-Dental and I changed recently to Pre-Physical Therapy. I am pretty much done with required classes and here are the grades:

Anatomy 1 = B
Anatomy 2 = taking it in Fall
Biology 1 = A
Biology 2 = A-
Gen Chem 1 = B+
Gen Chem 2 = B
Calc 1 = B-
Calc 2 = C+
Social Psyc = B-
Statistics = Taking it in Fall
Physics = Taking it in Fall
Nutrition = Taking it in Fall
Organic Chemistry 1 & 2 = B-
Human Population Genetics = A-
Medical Terminology = C+

With other classes and etc. My Cumulative GPA is 3.1

My Plan was to apply this year for Fall 2011 Entry to DPT but I feel like I am behind...and I don't have the entire application ready.

I recently started volunteering this summer at hospital in outpatient setting, total hours so far 21 hrs. Plus, I haven't started studying for GRE at all. I am graduating this December with a BS in Anthropology & Human Biology. Then study for GRE from January - March (I don't know how much time to spend studying) during that time, I will also gather my Personal Essay, Recommendation letter, build my volunteering hours. Then apply next July 15th 2011 for Fall 2012 entry.

I do not know if this is smart or not b/c I will be wasting an entire year. I know I should of planned accordingly but its life, things happened which made me change my career path....

My concern is, should I take the chance and risk applying this year and finish my "application" in a rush? I also haven't researched many DPT programs....I want to stay in Northeast part of US as i've been raised in MD and PA area, so if there is any suggestion with school/program I will gladly take your recommendation.

Thanks!:)
Dude, youre not behind at all. Actually, I shouldn't even be encouraging you because you are my competion....but yeah, your not behind. Just open up PTCAS and start applying. Even if you still feel your behind, apply to one school at least, maybe a non-ptcas school or something where it'll only cost like $25-$50 instead of $120 for one school using PTCAS.

University of Scranton the GRE isn't required, Franklin Pierce University in NH - their application deadline is like in April 2011 I think. Pretty much, not all schools require the GRE, and not all schools require to have ridiculous amounts of observation hours. Just gotta read up on them.
 
Last edited:
May 19, 2009
75
0
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
28 years old is actually the median age in my class! In both my class and next year's incoming there's more than a couple students in their 30s.

I had a slightly lower GPA than yours and got straight As on the prereqs at a community college to nudge up my GPA some. I also shadowed or worked as an aide in a variety of settings, got to know a few PTs pretty well and got excellent letters of recommendation (one of the college admissions staff told me on the phone my letters had "walk on water" material about me and that I need to give them big bouquets of flowers as thanks...which I did). I got accepted to one college, and waitlisted and eventually accepted to the other.

PT school is competitive, but if you want it bad enough and really throw yourself into getting in, you'll get in. Your current stats won't hold you back if you're serious and smart about getting in.
 
Feb 11, 2012
4
0
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I saw you say that you are a new mother. I am planning on getting my DPT but I also want to start a family. How do-able is going through DPT school with children in the picture? Any advice would be helpful!
 
Nov 14, 2010
283
3
41
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Phatmomma-thanks for the advice along with Teacher2PT. I am going to do some more research but I'm all but certain I will begin becoming prepared for PT school in the near future. I actually enrolled in law school this past fall, however withdrew after the first day of classes (was able to get everything back thankfully) due to some family issues and not being able to live away from my family (I realized that after I was enrolled and banked on getting into a program I could commute, however I did not get accepted so I had to take the school that I got accepted to). As I said my testing scores never seem to be great. I had a 156 on the LSAT both times I took it, but I'm hoping for a better GRE score. I am thankful at this point that I did not continue with the law school route, as I know so many attorneys that are miserable. I do know many happy ones, however I seem to find more miserable ones. Thanks for your help again guys.
I'm a career-changer myself who used to work in a law firm. I can echo your insights about miserable lawyers. I rarely met one at my (HUGE) firm that wasn't feeling burned out from working the equivalent of two jobs worth of hours with NO sense of "a day off" with their blackberries constantly chiming and deadlines popping up 24/7.

It can take a couple years to get your prereqs, but it's definitely worth it if you like PT. Maybe shadow first to make sure it's a setting you feel drawn to, and then take the plunge into prereqs. I am finishing up my prereqs right now, and I start PT school this summer (turning 29 this June)!

Good luck!
 
Mar 13, 2012
5
0
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Hey OP, I'm in a simialr situation. I acutally just posted this thread in the pre-pt forum but thought I'd also post it here. I hope you find it helpful:


I've spent the past couple of weeks reading the forums thereand finally decided to make a quick introductory thread.

I'm in the process of making a major career change to becomea DPT. I just turned 30 and I've been working as a tax accountant for the past2.5 years and as a CPA for just over a year. I graduated from ASU with a BS inaccountancy and continued on to get my MS in taxation. I spent the first twoyears of my career working as a tax consultant for one of the Big 4 accountingfirms. Overall I had a good experience but two years was enough for me to knowthat a career there wasn't what I wanted. I'm currently working as a mid-sizedlocal CPA firm. I enjoy it much more here than at the Big 4 firm but I'verealized that I'm not passionate enough about accounting & tax to continuein this career for the next 30-35 years and reach the level of success that Iwould like in my professional career.

I've been interested in a career as a PT ever since 2008when I had surgery and subsequent rehabilitation on both my legs for chronicexertion compartment syndrome. Since then, becoming a PT has always beensomething that has been in the back of my mind but something I've never doneout of fear of wasting my accounting education and career. Now that I know thata career in accounting isn't something I want, I'm going to pursue a career asa DPT.

I'm an endurance athlete and most recently competed in theIronman Arizona triathlon. I've been racing triathlons (mostly Olympic and HalfIronman distance) since my recovery from CECS in 2008. The ability to restoreand/or improve a person's quality of life after sustaining an injury oraccident is what I find most attractive about becoming a DPT regardless if thatperson is an athlete or not. I think I would find a career as a PT much more fulfillingthan what I'm currently doing professionally.

I am planning on quitting my job as a CPA after tax seasonand taking my perquisite courses at a community college since I already have aBachelors degree. I plan to apply next fall to NAU, Midwestern and AT Still forthe DPT classes that will start the summer of 2014. I will also seek outopportunities to observe and volunteer in a variety of PT settings. I know thatgoing back to school full time for 5 years won't be easy but I really think thisis something that I would be happy doing. Of course none of this would bepossible without the support of my wife. She is a Physician's Assistant and graduatedfrom the program at AT Still. Looks like I'm back to riding her coat tails fora few more years!

Anyways, I just wanted to introduce myself (I guess thiswasn't so short after all). I've found a lot of great information on this siteand look forward to making the transition into a PT career with all of you.Best of luck to everybody!
 
Dec 1, 2010
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Status
DPT / OTD
I saw you say that you are a new mother. I am planning on getting my DPT but I also want to start a family. How do-able is going through DPT school with children in the picture? Any advice would be helpful!
That depends on the program. You cannot be pregnant and working with cadavers. They advised us our first week that you shouldn't get pregnant while in the program. Although I could seriously see some of my younger counterparts getting pregnant toward the end of the last semester.
 
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hi dhjunkie, I am a bit older than you and have an english background, I even started a phd in communication once but now I am in finance as well and was at morgan, switched to merrill. how broke is broke? how do you get the prereq classes you need to get and work, and as an older student? any thoughts? I was premed way back before ungrad at cal, but I was talked into becoming a teacher - which is not the right fit, I have always loved health care but I am fiscally responsible for another so no idea how to do this. I originally thought about nutrition or allopathic medicine, even dermatology, but at this point I would like a shorter road with the possibility to secure work on the way. I would love to hear about how you are doing it. thanks.
 
Mar 26, 2013
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Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
If there is a career changer on this forum, please can you share with me your experience and thought process in arriving to your decision to become a PT. I am giving PT heavy consideration. I find my current job very unfulfilling and empty; I don't see a career for myself. I look up at management and I don't have any incentive or passion to become one of them. ( Also a fellow finance, but my undergrad was economics)

My story...
I have always loved sports and believe in holistic and natural solutions. I don't believe in flu shots and only take medication when necessary. I was a college swimmer and had an IT band issues. I went to physical therapy and was very glad someone introduce to me a my best friend, the foam roller ! Every since then, I've raved about the benefits of physical therapy and preventative care. I tagged along with my aunt and uncle to a PT session and found that I was genuinely interested.

I understand that I will have to go back and take pre-req undergrad sci courses and am okay with that. I just would like to make sure this is a good decision!

I appreciate your help!