r123

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I declared my Chemistry B.S with biochem concentration major yesterday. But, I was wondering if I did the right thing? or Should I have just gone for the standard Chem major.

The worst part about it is that I will be graduating at the age of 24. I was hoping to graduate by next year at the age of 23. This is the result of transferring from cc to 4 yr. University. Since I am the oldest girl among my siblings, I’m feeling bad/embarrassed/heartache about it. That I am not a good role model for my younger siblings. (I'm sorry, but that’s how I feel). Anyway, I have to deal with it now.

Will graduating at the age of 24 hurt my chances getting into US med school?

What should I change my major to? Biology?

I'm having very frustrating time right now; I don't know what to major in even at this stage!
 

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r123 said:
I declared my Chemistry B.S with biochem concentration major yesterday. But I was wondering if I did the right thing? or Should I have just gone for the standard Chem major.

The worest part about it is that I will be graduating at the age of 24. I was hopping to graduate by next year at the age of 23. This is the result of transferring from cc to 4 yr. University.

Will graduating at the age of 24 hurt my chances getting into US med school?
I hope not, I'm turning 24 next year!
 

Andre04

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It won't hurt your chances, but you'll just be so old I don't know why you'd want to go. I mean, mid-twenties, geez!

Do you want to specialize in geriatrics? In that case it might help.
 

greytmedic

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Oh my, graduating at 24, jeez, that is old. Oh wait, I'm 28 and graduating next year. :rolleyes:
 

Brainsucker

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You don't need the biochem concentration for med school. It won't help a bit for admissions and it'll won't be of great use during the year. (Med school biochem concentrates on only a couple of the things you'll have to suffer through as a biochem major.)
 

Learfan

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Biochemistry is a bit more practical since you will receive some training in a branch of science that is growing and advancing while chemistry is a dead science in terms of a career option. There are very few jobs available to chemists above the lab tech level. Do not pursue an advanced degree in the subject as there are no jobs at the PhD level. I left a career in chemistry after giving up on getting a job with a company I liked. If you major in any science field, direct your energies toward entering medicine, dentistry, pharmacy or other life science profession as that is the only economically viable option. Good luck.



r123 said:
I declared my Chemistry B.S with biochem concentration major yesterday. But I was wondering if I did the right thing? or Should I have just gone for the standard Chem major.

The worest part about it is that I will be graduating at the age of 24. I was hopping to graduate by next year at the age of 23. This is the result of transferring from cc to 4 yr. University.

Will graduating at the age of 24 hurt my chances getting into US med school?
 
W

WWU_Viking

I am in your same situation! I started at a CC after high scool. The first year was part time for medical reasons and during that time was also performing a lot of classical music.

Then i went to CC for 2 years and ended with a 2.9 GPA, thought I was doing a BS Biochemistry major. Being close to home, I worked in a pharmacy part time as well. I hope that will help me. Now I am transfering to a university (i think my ec's and personal statement really helped me get in) and will be there for three full years, i changed my major to Biology/Anthropology BS, i wanted to study something non science also. I'll live in dorms with my two friends the first year....and there are dorms and on campus apartments for "older" students as well.

My last year I will be 23-24 (bday in feb) years old. I think being at a university for three years (and maybe excess summer quarters) will help me get into med school. I'm applying summer of my last year, so during the year long gap I may work or do an SMP program.

GOOD LUCK. If I had to do it again I would have grown up in high school to get into a 4 year right after.
Anyways, good luck.
 

IDforMe

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Good grief. This is not a situation where you must keep pace with everyone else. Although I am in danger of seeming like a die-hard hippie... It's all about the journey, man. Who cares whether you graduate when you are 20 or 58. The fact of the matter is, you graduated. Get on with your dreams. Comparing yourself to someone else is like comparing an apple to an orange, or a lime to a grapefruit. We're all different (thank god) and the adcomm is not going to think you're a slacker if it took you a little longer to explore your career choices.
 

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Learfan said:
Biochemistry is a bit more practical since you will receive some training in a branch of science that is growing and advancing while chemistry is a dead science in terms of a career option. There are very few jobs available to chemists above the lab tech level. Do not pursue an advanced degree in the subject as there are no jobs at the PhD level. I left a career in chemistry after giving up on getting a job with a company I liked. If you major in any science field, direct your energies toward entering medicine, dentistry, pharmacy or other life science profession as that is the only economically viable option. Good luck.
That's not true...there are a lot of opportunities to pursue with a chem major. You just won't be purely doing theoretical chemistry as your work; you'll be applying it. The place where I work is full of chem Ph.D's with very good salaries.
 

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24. Very old. I was a mere kid graduating with a BS in chem and math at the tender young age of 38. Starting med school in 3 weeks. Yup. Being an ancient 24 will definitely hurt your chances. :rolleyes: ;)
 

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:laugh: :laugh:


Good luck dude.

Thanks for making me feel ancient.
I'll be in med school in just a couple of weeks.
 
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r123

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Brainsucker said:
You don't need the biochem concentration for med school. It won't help a bit for admissions and it'll won't be of great use during the year. (Med school biochem concentrates on only a couple of the things you'll have to suffer through as a biochem major.)


Are you sure? Because I am going to change my major to standard Chem. But, I would need to take the same amt of classes for both degree. For Biochem. I will be getting more bio classes than chem classes. I'm confused. :confused: Should I just go with the original major?
 

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r123 said:
I was hopping to graduate by next year at the age of 23. This is the result of transferring from cc to 4 yr. University.

Will graduating at the age of 24 hurt my chances getting into US med school?
I think you'll be okay to go to med school, but hopping to graduation might hurt your leg :laugh:
 
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r123

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thesauce said:
I think you'll be okay to go to med school, but hopping to graduation might hurt your leg :laugh:
Uh, I was typing fast and misspelled.
 

Learfan

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That is quite funny. Check the American Chemical Society annual salary and employment survey published each year in Chemical and Engineering News. Only 38% of PhD level chemists actually find work in their field. Can you say "That sucks!!!!!" I knew you could.

I tried to locate a job with another company other than the one that I was currently working for over a period of 13 years. No success. I had patents, sales support experience, management experience including an MBA from a top 20 school, commercial successes, new product introductions, knowledge of three major chemical areas including surfactants, oil field chemicals and solvents and still no new job. You are only a hot ticket for two or three years after your PhD and then you are all but unemployable. The trick to success as a PhD is to get out of the technical area fast and into management. If you do not get into management, you are a highly credentialed marginally employable person just one layoff away from working at Burger King. I speak from a total of 18 years of industry experience. There may be many lower level jobs in academics that pay decent wages but high paying industry jobs which I define as over $100K are moving to India. My former company will be opening their new research center there in 2007. I walked from a no future position making $110K to go into medicine. Work on getting into a medical field. There will be far more opportunity.



Slide said:
That's not true...there are a lot of opportunities to pursue with a chem major. You just won't be purely doing theoretical chemistry as your work; you'll be applying it. The place where I work is full of chem Ph.D's with very good salaries.
 

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Mooby said:
No. It will not hurt your chances.

the average age of matriculation is 24
 

Svidrillion

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r123 said:
Will graduating at the age of 24 hurt my chances getting into US med school?
Hell no. The older you are, the better, because you probably then actually have some life experience (unlike the majority of 21-22 year olds). It's like IDforMe said.

I'm [expletive deleted] 26 and if I get in I'll be [expletive deleted] 27, and I'm so much [expletive deleted] better off for it.

One thing I love about SDN, though, is truth by fiat. "the average age of matriculation is 24," he says, as though spoken by a divine mouth. But where does it say that?
 

Brainsucker

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r123 said:
[/COLOR]

Are you sure? Because I am going to change my major to standard Chem. But, I would need to take the same amt of classes for both degree. For Biochem. I will be getting more bio classes than chem classes. I'm confused. :confused: Should I just go with the original major?
Go with whatever major you think will be more interesting. I was a biochem major and I think I would have enjoyed being a chem major more (my electives in the department were straight chem classes). Knowledge of a few pathways will come in handy in med school but it's not worth all the other junk you'll have to memorize if you're a biochem major. (A biochem class is useful. A whole major is not so useful.)
 

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Learfan said:
That is quite funny. Check the American Chemical Society annual salary and employment survey published each year in Chemical and Engineering News. Only 38% of PhD level chemists actually find work in their field. Can you say "That sucks!!!!!" I knew you could.

I tried to locate a job with another company other than the one that I was currently working for over a period of 13 years. No success. I had patents, sales support experience, management experience including an MBA from a top 20 school, commercial successes, new product introductions, knowledge of three major chemical areas including surfactants, oil field chemicals and solvents and still no new job. You are only a hot ticket for two or three years after your PhD and then you are all but unemployable. The trick to success as a PhD is to get out of the technical area fast and into management. If you do not get into management, you are a highly credentialed marginally employable person just one layoff away from working at Burger King. I speak from a total of 18 years of industry experience. There may be many lower level jobs in academics that pay decent wages but high paying industry jobs which I define as over $100K are moving to India. My former company will be opening their new research center there in 2007. I walked from a no future position making $110K to go into medicine. Work on getting into a medical field. There will be far more opportunity.
Wow that's pretty unfortunate. People at school and my company are trying to get me to stick to chemistry and go to grad school and get offers from their company. But I guess part of it is because I'm fortunate to be close to a large biotech/pharma industry area where jobs are more commonplace. I know that some pharma companies are trying to get all the experienced chemists they can get. Then again, you're the more experienced one, so I suppose your judgment has more cred then mine.
 
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r123

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Brainsucker said:
Go with whatever major you think will be more interesting. I was a biochem major and I think I would have enjoyed being a chem major more (my electives in the department were straight chem classes). Knowledge of a few pathways will come in handy in med school but it's not worth all the other junk you'll have to memorize if you're a biochem major. (A biochem class is useful. A whole major is not so useful.)
The problem is that I think both fields are interesting. Would you suggest I go with bio major since thats what I will be learning once I get into med school? Or chem. since I like that too and can do better on it than Bio? I know that doesn't make sense. :D
 

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Just go with Biology or whatever is interesting to you. And of course what you will excel in...

Of course you should take classes like physiology, genetics, and biochemistry in order to prepare yourself for the MCAT and medical school.

Classes like Microbiology and Developmental Biology are also helpful.

(I'm a Biology major so take that as you wish).

Anthropology is good too. If you like culture, biology, and evolution that is. :)

And many med schools do like anthropology and treat it as "humanities" which are required. Classes like "Medical Anthropology" are a plus. (Take a look at University of Michigan's suggested courses.)
 

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r123 said:
The problem is that I think both fields are interesting. Would you suggest I go with bio major since thats what I will be learning once I get into med school? Or chem. since I like that too and can do better on it than Bio? I know that doesn't make sense. :D
I'd say do chem. You'll do plenty of memorization in med school, might as well do some thinking now.
 

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r123 said:
The problem is that I think both fields are interesting. Would you suggest I go with bio major since thats what I will be learning once I get into med school? Or chem. since I like that too and can do better on it than Bio? I know that doesn't make sense. :D

Just to throw that out, it seems that those who do "worse" in med school are mainly bio majors because they come in with already substantial knowledge and psychologically feel like maybe they don't need to learn/do as much...
People with majors totally unrelated to biology/physiology tend to do better because they are required to throw themselves straight into the subject, and are basically learning everything anew.

My two cents is that if you're interested in chemistry as well as biology, I would go for the chemistry major because at least, you will have knowledge of a different field than the one you will have to learn again in med school. Also, it strenghtens your biochemistry background which is always a plus, and you won't be like the other 60% of the med applicants pack that are bio majors.

If you like biology also, you can always take bio classes as well as electives. But I guess the opposite is true too.