Cleveland Clinic Internal Medicine Residency

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Handsome88

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Resident_ccf,

Would Cleveland accept an IMG with step 1 score of ~235? Is that still within range? I ask because CCF is one of my top choices.
Resident_ccf,

Would Cleveland accept an IMG with step 1 score of ~235? Is that still within range? I ask because CCF is one of my top choices. The rest of my app is strong.
-- Another resident from the CCF brotherhood
Ignorant people are usually the blind instrument of its own destruction. Making a decision about medical training sounds important to me. I would not let rumors blind myself without getting first hand information.

This whole discussion is non sense and completely infertile. To begin with (-With all respect to CapitanMD) rumors coming from someone who does not form part of the CCF brotherhood, who does not identify himself -who based his post on second hand data from an unknown resident from the program. - Seem really far away from reality to me. But, since "Ignorance is deliberately bold" - and lack of information might mislead future resident in his decision, I found important to clarify few points -I even clarify real concerns that CapitanMD is having since he is considering Us as one of his choices. Hope you accept this (not so rumor) from another resident when you make your decision this year for training

I am listening to your concern -CapitanMD and that is why I am spending more than few minute of my lunch time to make this post - after having my academic half and presenting during our resident to resident Trial 101 -where we discuss important trial among resident for practical purposes.

To start my name Aldo (No hidden identity) - PGY2 at CCF main campus - more than welcome to assists in any question you might have - The whole reason I am doing this is because I want the best of the best for my program and new intern recruits are the foundation of any program. As previously mention numbers talks alone - we have had a great pool of smart guys over the last years - Amazing how different experiences around the world get combined to one practice.

Just to give brief overview of my experience in the program -I come from a medical training with immense autonomy -(I was in charge of everything for my patients from getting blood draws to doing wound debridement even in internal medicine if no surgical consultation was required and taking deliveries without/minimal supervision)

Having said that (I know what real autonomy means)-The experience is CCF have being wonderful with great autonomy and opportunities all across and a vast variety of the most complex and rare cases. Will not try to convince anyone -I just one to put my experience from a true resident

I. Autonomy and exposure: true sometime is hard to find procedures since patient safety have being a major point this days and multiple specialties BUT Step forward and you will get whatever you want here -if you show the minimal confidence and knowledge necessary to approach this complex cases, you will do a lot
- I have done many lumbar punctures, thoracentesis (even on the vent), A-lines, and paracentesis (with out supervision) during my first year since stepped forward enough to sign out in all of them).
- I was able to perform intubations event with Glidoscope for difficult intubation, central lines under fellow supervision and guidance and even Swans Ganz in the MICU supervise by one of the Head of the Pulm Medicine Staff
- I managed ventilator with the help of respiratory therapist making changes overnight for the benefit of the patient.
- Since last half of y 1st year and beginning of 2nd -- I have run ~5 codes by myself even with the presence of MICU staff and AMET staff providing guidance only but everybody following my instruction as leader. Amazing experience
- I have cardioverted patient out of A-fib under fellow supervision and I have broken down SVTs -leading the team at the floor alone with the support of the nurse staff.
- I have autonomy to make changes early in the morning as long as they are within standard of care and with enough data to support my decisions

It is true that we have a lot of help at different levels - but It is also true that is your decision to just call to let someone do it - or to call them a actively participate with them until you learn - Like going with echo cardiogram technician to learn how to do basic bedside echocardiogram -they do millions or taking the US by yourself in MICU an look for pleural fluid by yourself before getting the help from the fellow.

I haven't done CICU so cannot comment on that - My co-resident have commented on that already

II. Complex cases - My favorite point is that I see the patient with the diseases I read about! - you see research happening all around
Some of the cases, I have managed = Hemophagocytic syndrome, CLIPPERS, multidrug resistant TBC with TOF and empyema, Takosubo cardiomyopathy, patient undergoing reverse PCI, Magic syndrome, Acrodermititis Entero-hepatica, Steven-Johnson, Good syndrome, GVHD of the lung, Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the Liver, Acetaminophen induced liver failure, Zoster encephalitis, CNS lyme, Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Calciphylaxis, Dysphagia lusoria, Cerebral sarcoidosis, PAtient with mutiple cardiac stent (x14) with severe in-stent restenosis,

III. High Volume work load & Teaching
We are a busy hospital that boost you multitasking to level never imagined - Multitasking was not one of my skills at the beginning of the residency - now after being involved in this high volume and turn over setting, I feel like fish in the water able to settle and prioritize task while being effective. Now normal life seems to be happening in slow motion. Once you get used to the system in the first few month -everything seems chill
We always find teaching opportunities -
1. We have academic have days - 1 day for each year if your effective enough could attend to 3 days of teaching
2. We are developing multiple teaching opportunities from the resident to the resident with lectures series like Medicine 101 - practical approach to common problem in the floor from a senior perspective based on update guidelines and standard of care to boost intern confidence. Trial 101 - kind of journal club done from and for resident to discuss landmark trials every week.
3. Grand round from different specialties focus on Internal medicine tyoe of knowledge,
4. Special noon conferences every week with special guests, or complex cases analysis from top physician in the programs -how to approach and think though the case .
5. Morning report - discussion of cases
6. Jeopardy games. All these new development with the help of the chief.

IV. As previously mentioned - you interact with big names - leaders in their field, people that have read >1.000.000 formal EKG, who has trained with the best of the best - and you interact with them

So again happy to help anyone that has any doubt about the program - Hope everybody gets some clear ideas with these few posts - & you are more than welcome to rotate with us if you can find a host and get first hand experience.

The whole idea is to let people know how is CCF in reality and continue to get the best

CCF-Vzla

What are the fellowship matches like at CCF? Specifically competitive ones like GI/Cards..etc. What's the % that goes unmatched?
 

jdh71

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does this brotherhood have a special hand-shake?

because I would think that would be very important

of course it might be the kind of thing you actually CAN'T talk about, like the masons or something

but if I were a candidate interviewing I'd need to find out more about a handshake, because no brotherhood is complete without a secret handshake, and if there isn't one, someone should really explain why

also, do women get to be part of the brotherhood, or is this some boys only club, and how do the female residents feel about this, or do they know?

important questions
 

resident_ccf

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-- Another resident from the CCF brotherhood
Ignorant people are usually the blind instrument of its own destruction. Making a decision about medical training sounds important to me. I would not let rumors blind myself without getting first hand information.

This whole discussion is non sense and completely infertile. To begin with (-With all respect to CapitanMD) rumors coming from someone who does not form part of the CCF brotherhood, who does not identify himself -who based his post on second hand data from an unknown resident from the program. - Seem really far away from reality to me. But, since "Ignorance is deliberately bold" - and lack of information might mislead future resident in his decision, I found important to clarify few points -I even clarify real concerns that CapitanMD is having since he is considering Us as one of his choices. Hope you accept this (not so rumor) from another resident when you make your decision this year for training

I am listening to your concern -CapitanMD and that is why I am spending more than few minute of my lunch time to make this post - after having my academic half and presenting during our resident to resident Trial 101 -where we discuss important trial among resident for practical purposes.

To start my name Aldo (No hidden identity) - PGY2 at CCF main campus - more than welcome to assists in any question you might have - The whole reason I am doing this is because I want the best of the best for my program and new intern recruits are the foundation of any program. As previously mention numbers talks alone - we have had a great pool of smart guys over the last years - Amazing how different experiences around the world get combined to one practice.

Just to give brief overview of my experience in the program -I come from a medical training with immense autonomy -(I was in charge of everything for my patients from getting blood draws to doing wound debridement even in internal medicine if no surgical consultation was required and taking deliveries without/minimal supervision)

Having said that (I know what real autonomy means)-The experience is CCF have being wonderful with great autonomy and opportunities all across and a vast variety of the most complex and rare cases. Will not try to convince anyone -I just one to put my experience from a true resident

I. Autonomy and exposure: true sometime is hard to find procedures since patient safety have being a major point this days and multiple specialties BUT Step forward and you will get whatever you want here -if you show the minimal confidence and knowledge necessary to approach this complex cases, you will do a lot
- I have done many lumbar punctures, thoracentesis (even on the vent), A-lines, and paracentesis (with out supervision) during my first year since stepped forward enough to sign out in all of them).
- I was able to perform intubations event with Glidoscope for difficult intubation, central lines under fellow supervision and guidance and even Swans Ganz in the MICU supervise by one of the Head of the Pulm Medicine Staff
- I managed ventilator with the help of respiratory therapist making changes overnight for the benefit of the patient.
- Since last half of y 1st year and beginning of 2nd -- I have run ~5 codes by myself even with the presence of MICU staff and AMET staff providing guidance only but everybody following my instruction as leader. Amazing experience
- I have cardioverted patient out of A-fib under fellow supervision and I have broken down SVTs -leading the team at the floor alone with the support of the nurse staff.
- I have autonomy to make changes early in the morning as long as they are within standard of care and with enough data to support my decisions

It is true that we have a lot of help at different levels - but It is also true that is your decision to just call to let someone do it - or to call them a actively participate with them until you learn - Like going with echo cardiogram technician to learn how to do basic bedside echocardiogram -they do millions or taking the US by yourself in MICU an look for pleural fluid by yourself before getting the help from the fellow.

I haven't done CICU so cannot comment on that - My co-resident have commented on that already

II. Complex cases - My favorite point is that I see the patient with the diseases I read about! - you see research happening all around
Some of the cases, I have managed = Hemophagocytic syndrome, CLIPPERS, multidrug resistant TBC with TOF and empyema, Takosubo cardiomyopathy, patient undergoing reverse PCI, Magic syndrome, Acrodermititis Entero-hepatica, Steven-Johnson, Good syndrome, GVHD of the lung, Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the Liver, Acetaminophen induced liver failure, Zoster encephalitis, CNS lyme, Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Calciphylaxis, Dysphagia lusoria, Cerebral sarcoidosis, PAtient with mutiple cardiac stent (x14) with severe in-stent restenosis,

III. High Volume work load & Teaching
We are a busy hospital that boost you multitasking to level never imagined - Multitasking was not one of my skills at the beginning of the residency - now after being involved in this high volume and turn over setting, I feel like fish in the water able to settle and prioritize task while being effective. Now normal life seems to be happening in slow motion. Once you get used to the system in the first few month -everything seems chill
We always find teaching opportunities -
1. We have academic have days - 1 day for each year if your effective enough could attend to 3 days of teaching
2. We are developing multiple teaching opportunities from the resident to the resident with lectures series like Medicine 101 - practical approach to common problem in the floor from a senior perspective based on update guidelines and standard of care to boost intern confidence. Trial 101 - kind of journal club done from and for resident to discuss landmark trials every week.
3. Grand round from different specialties focus on Internal medicine tyoe of knowledge,
4. Special noon conferences every week with special guests, or complex cases analysis from top physician in the programs -how to approach and think though the case .
5. Morning report - discussion of cases
6. Jeopardy games. All these new development with the help of the chief.

IV. As previously mentioned - you interact with big names - leaders in their field, people that have read >1.000.000 formal EKG, who has trained with the best of the best - and you interact with them

So again happy to help anyone that has any doubt about the program - Hope everybody gets some clear ideas with these few posts - & you are more than welcome to rotate with us if you can find a host and get first hand experience.

The whole idea is to let people know how is CCF in reality and continue to get the best

CCF-Vzla

Good job Aldo, as always!
 

Neph Fellow

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-- Another resident from the CCF brotherhood
Ignorant people are usually the blind instrument of its own destruction. Making a decision about medical training sounds important to me. I would not let rumors blind myself without getting first hand information.

This whole discussion is non sense and completely infertile. To begin with (-With all respect to CapitanMD) rumors coming from someone who does not form part of the CCF brotherhood, who does not identify himself -who based his post on second hand data from an unknown resident from the program. - Seem really far away from reality to me. But, since "Ignorance is deliberately bold" - and lack of information might mislead future resident in his decision, I found important to clarify few points -I even clarify real concerns that CapitanMD is having since he is considering Us as one of his choices. Hope you accept this (not so rumor) from another resident when you make your decision this year for training

I am listening to your concern -CapitanMD and that is why I am spending more than few minute of my lunch time to make this post - after having my academic half and presenting during our resident to resident Trial 101 -where we discuss important trial among resident for practical purposes.

To start my name Aldo (No hidden identity) - PGY2 at CCF main campus - more than welcome to assists in any question you might have - The whole reason I am doing this is because I want the best of the best for my program and new intern recruits are the foundation of any program. As previously mention numbers talks alone - we have had a great pool of smart guys over the last years - Amazing how different experiences around the world get combined to one practice.

Just to give brief overview of my experience in the program -I come from a medical training with immense autonomy -(I was in charge of everything for my patients from getting blood draws to doing wound debridement even in internal medicine if no surgical consultation was required and taking deliveries without/minimal supervision)

Having said that (I know what real autonomy means)-The experience is CCF have being wonderful with great autonomy and opportunities all across and a vast variety of the most complex and rare cases. Will not try to convince anyone -I just one to put my experience from a true resident

I. Autonomy and exposure: true sometime is hard to find procedures since patient safety have being a major point this days and multiple specialties BUT Step forward and you will get whatever you want here -if you show the minimal confidence and knowledge necessary to approach this complex cases, you will do a lot
- I have done many lumbar punctures, thoracentesis (even on the vent), A-lines, and paracentesis (with out supervision) during my first year since stepped forward enough to sign out in all of them).
- I was able to perform intubations event with Glidoscope for difficult intubation, central lines under fellow supervision and guidance and even Swans Ganz in the MICU supervise by one of the Head of the Pulm Medicine Staff
- I managed ventilator with the help of respiratory therapist making changes overnight for the benefit of the patient.
- Since last half of y 1st year and beginning of 2nd -- I have run ~5 codes by myself even with the presence of MICU staff and AMET staff providing guidance only but everybody following my instruction as leader. Amazing experience
- I have cardioverted patient out of A-fib under fellow supervision and I have broken down SVTs -leading the team at the floor alone with the support of the nurse staff.
- I have autonomy to make changes early in the morning as long as they are within standard of care and with enough data to support my decisions

It is true that we have a lot of help at different levels - but It is also true that is your decision to just call to let someone do it - or to call them a actively participate with them until you learn - Like going with echo cardiogram technician to learn how to do basic bedside echocardiogram -they do millions or taking the US by yourself in MICU an look for pleural fluid by yourself before getting the help from the fellow.

I haven't done CICU so cannot comment on that - My co-resident have commented on that already

II. Complex cases - My favorite point is that I see the patient with the diseases I read about! - you see research happening all around
Some of the cases, I have managed = Hemophagocytic syndrome, CLIPPERS, multidrug resistant TBC with TOF and empyema, Takosubo cardiomyopathy, patient undergoing reverse PCI, Magic syndrome, Acrodermititis Entero-hepatica, Steven-Johnson, Good syndrome, GVHD of the lung, Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the Liver, Acetaminophen induced liver failure, Zoster encephalitis, CNS lyme, Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Calciphylaxis, Dysphagia lusoria, Cerebral sarcoidosis, PAtient with mutiple cardiac stent (x14) with severe in-stent restenosis,

III. High Volume work load & Teaching
We are a busy hospital that boost you multitasking to level never imagined - Multitasking was not one of my skills at the beginning of the residency - now after being involved in this high volume and turn over setting, I feel like fish in the water able to settle and prioritize task while being effective. Now normal life seems to be happening in slow motion. Once you get used to the system in the first few month -everything seems chill
We always find teaching opportunities -
1. We have academic have days - 1 day for each year if your effective enough could attend to 3 days of teaching
2. We are developing multiple teaching opportunities from the resident to the resident with lectures series like Medicine 101 - practical approach to common problem in the floor from a senior perspective based on update guidelines and standard of care to boost intern confidence. Trial 101 - kind of journal club done from and for resident to discuss landmark trials every week.
3. Grand round from different specialties focus on Internal medicine tyoe of knowledge,
4. Special noon conferences every week with special guests, or complex cases analysis from top physician in the programs -how to approach and think though the case .
5. Morning report - discussion of cases
6. Jeopardy games. All these new development with the help of the chief.

IV. As previously mentioned - you interact with big names - leaders in their field, people that have read >1.000.000 formal EKG, who has trained with the best of the best - and you interact with them

So again happy to help anyone that has any doubt about the program - Hope everybody gets some clear ideas with these few posts - & you are more than welcome to rotate with us if you can find a host and get first hand experience.

The whole idea is to let people know how is CCF in reality and continue to get the best

CCF-Vzla


Hello All,

My name is George and I am a first year nephrology fellow at the Cleveland Clinic. I actually did my residency training at the Clinic as well - graduated last year. So the experience is still pretty fresh in my mind. Let me tell start by telling you that I interviewed in roughly 10 top programs last year and that includes MGH/Brigham, Hopkins, Yale, WASHU, North Western, UPMC, Mayo Clinic… and the list goes on. I ranked the Cleveland Clinic first and without much hesitation, because I could hardly find a program that offers half of the things we take for granted at CCF. I had no ‘personal reasons’ bounding me to Cleveland (such as family) and I made my decision purely on the basis of training.

I just had a few comments on what was being said about our program:

1. Regarding the current chiefs - It is well known to most of us that Mani and Edwin did not take their boards this year. They must have said this 100 times since July. Both were among the smartest people in our class and I have a hard time believing they could even come close to failing. Besides being knowledgeable, they had a reputation for being humble, patient and understanding. We were ALL thrilled when they got the chief position. I cannot name a single person that would have been more deserving of that position.

2. Regarding our matches: every few months, we hear a rumor stating the Cleveland Clinic doesn’t take it’s own residents for fellowship. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Our residents get accepted into ALL the fellowship programs, no exception. Last year, 2 of our residents got accepted in cardiology, 2 in GI, 2 in nephrology, 1 in ID, 1 in pulmonary… and that’s true every year! I wonder, when was the last time UH or OSU managed to get any of their residents into our fellowship programs?

3. On workload/volume/exposure: that is certainly one of our program’s strong points. We see a big variety of cases, from the regular bread and butter cases to the zebras. The level of complexity is often high, which makes us very comfortable dealing with complexe cases. We get a TREMENDOUS exposure on our consult services. Being a tertiary center, we rotate of course on the common consult services like cardiology, GI, nephrology, pulmonology… but we also get exposed to other areas that may not exist in other hospitals: pall med, vascular medicine, transplant ID, transplant nephrology, hepatology…


4. On the program being malignant Vs benign: I think there are some advantages to having a big program. Namely, the schedule is AWESOME!!!! Few examples below:
- Renal service and IM service: we do either days (no calls), or nights not both. When on nights, the schedule is a q3 schedule; meaning you come at 5pm and leave the next day around 10AM, then you’re HOME till the third night. In other words, you are working 10 days out of 30
- Cardiology, GI/liver: function on a q6 basis
- Oncology: only service that still function on a q4 basis
- MICU: 2 weeks of days (6 days 7AM-5PM), 2 weeks of nights (Q2 – i.e. one night working, one night at home)

I don’t think there are many programs that offer that much time off between nights. I know for a fact that many programs in Cleveland make their residents work 6 nights out of 7 during their float weeks

5. Regarding research: there are countless opportunities. Each department has physicians that are well known nationally and internationally. Working with them will not only get you published, but will guarantee you fellowship interviews. In addition, as an intern, you have the opportunity to apply for a scholar track that will give you four dedicated months of research in your second year.


Overall, my experience in the CCF IM program was amazing. I don’t think I could have been trained better anywhere else. As Aldo stated earlier, we are all available to answer questions or concerns. I realize that many people may not find our program to be a good fit for them. It’s not a reason for inaccurate rumors or hateful comments. Good luck for all the applicants!
 

dozitgetchahi

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3. On workload/volume/exposure: that is certainly one of our program’s strong points. We see a big variety of cases, from the regular bread and butter cases to the zebras. The level of complexity is often high, which makes us very comfortable dealing with complexe cases. We get a TREMENDOUS exposure on our consult services. Being a tertiary center, we rotate of course on the common consult services like cardiology, GI, nephrology, pulmonology… but we also get exposed to other areas that may not exist in other hospitals: pall med, vascular medicine, transplant ID, transplant nephrology, hepatology…
!

This keeps getting brought up like it's something totally unique to CCF...it really isn't. Our program rotates through several hospitals, and we have inpatient cardiology, heme/onc, hepatology, etc services as well as the full ensemble of consult services including transplant ID vs regular ID etc. And jesus christ, it's not like CCF is the only facility with a palliative med service out there.
 

Instatewaiter

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totally
 
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CCF_resident

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Briefly, this the match list for CCF 2013! Feel free to contact IM office to get your copy! Then you can say whatever you want! :)

Cardiology

- University of Manitoba (Canada)

- Cleveland clinic

- Henry Ford

- Univ of South Alabama

- Drexel University

- Mores town Hospital NJ

- Cleveland Clinic

- University of Kentucky

- Medical University of South Carolina (old graduate)

- University of Rochester

- Univ of Illinois

- UCLA

- Wash U

- Henry Ford (old graduate)

Heme/Onc

- CCF

- Vanderbilt

- Washington U

- Pittsburgh/UPMC


GI

- UT southwestern

- GI (old CCF graduate)

Nephrology

- Indiana


Pulmonary Critical Care

- Uni of Buffalo

- Cleveland Clinic

- Ohio state

- UCSD


Palliative medicine

- CCF

Rheumatology

- MGH

Vascular medicine
- MGH

Endocrinology

- UPMC

- Loyola

- Brown university

- UT Houston


P.S Right only 2 went to CCF cards, however, rest of the Cards fellows were divided equally ~1-2 from Duke, Hopkins, MGH, BWH and 2 other places!

P.S If the training at CCF-IM is not good, how would PDs from big places like UCLA, Wash U, Vanderbilt, UPMC, etc accept CCF-IM residents to become their fellows! you might ask your self that question!
 
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Aatish Garg

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Cleveland Clinic Internal Medicine Residency : Fellowship Match : Class of 2015




CARDIOLOGY

1. Cleveland Clinic, OH

2. UPMC

3. Emory

4. Mid America Heart

5. Iowa University

6. Baylor, Houston

7. Baylor, Houston

8. Methodist, Houston

9. Miami University

10. University of Arizona

11. University of Arkansas

12. Beth Isreal, NY

13. Beth Isreal, NY

14. Christiana Care, Delaware

15. CCf, Florida

16. Cooper University

17. Georgetown University


Gastroenterology


1. Cleveland Clinic

2. Cleveland Clinic

3. UPMC

4. Univ of Colarado

5. Baylor, Dallas

6. Henry Ford

7. Henry Ford


Hem- Onc


1. Mayo Clinic

2. Mayo Clinic

3. Wash U

4. Case Western

5. Angels of Hope, California

6. Wayne State


Pulmonary and Critical Care


1. Cleveland Clinic

2. Univ of Texas

3. Case Western


Rheumatology

1. Cleveland Clinic


Nephrology

1. Cleveland Clinic

2. Cleveland Clinic


Endocrinology

1. Ohio State
 
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