MissionComplete

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Hi!

I'm about to start surgery next month and everyone says that you're supposed to get Dansko clogs. Anyone have any insight on these? Are they really the best? They seem like they range from $100-$250. Could I wear painted ones like these or would they be really unprofessional?

Has anyone tried the Calzuro's?

Has anyone tried the Croc's? These seem the cheapest so I could buy a couple different colors to swap around, etc...

For anyone who's on surgery, what do people do? Do they wear them with slack/skirts or do they only wear them with scrubs. Do people wear them on medicine? I'm on optho now so I'm not even in the hospital and have to be super dressed everyday so insight is definitely needed! :D

Thanks again!
 

Ginkneephur

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I have crocs but they're not very comfy so I end up wearing sneakers when I'm volunteering (I'm pre-med but I thought I could help out with your clogs question) :p
 

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MissionComplete said:
Hi!

I'm about to start surgery next month and everyone says that you're supposed to get Dansko clogs. Anyone have any insight on these? Are they really the best? They seem like they range from $100-$250. Could I wear painted ones like these or would they be really unprofessional?

Has anyone tried the Calzuro's?

Has anyone tried the Croc's? These seem the cheapest so I could buy a couple different colors to swap around, etc...

For anyone who's on surgery, what do people do? Do they wear them with slack/skirts or do they only wear them with scrubs. Do people wear them on medicine? I'm on optho now so I'm not even in the hospital and have to be super dressed everyday so insight is definitely needed! :D

Thanks again!

I'm just about to start med school, but have been working in a lab for a couple of years. I've had lots of back problems and my feet were always killing me at the end of the day wearing tennis shoes so I finally broke down and bought some Dansko cause they seemed to have the most arch support. It's amazing. My feet don't hurt at the end of a day and my back problems have decreased. I definitly think they are worth the investment and people have told me that one pair can last you 7 years. (Sorry for the horrible grammer, but I just got back from Europe and jet lag sucks when it feels like 4am!) Hope it helps.
 
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MissionComplete said:
Hi!

I'm about to start surgery next month and everyone says that you're supposed to get Dansko clogs. Anyone have any insight on these? Are they really the best? They seem like they range from $100-$250. Could I wear painted ones like these or would they be really unprofessional?

Has anyone tried the Calzuro's?

Has anyone tried the Croc's? These seem the cheapest so I could buy a couple different colors to swap around, etc...

For anyone who's on surgery, what do people do? Do they wear them with slack/skirts or do they only wear them with scrubs. Do people wear them on medicine? I'm on optho now so I'm not even in the hospital and have to be super dressed everyday so insight is definitely needed! :D

Thanks again!

I worked in an OR for awhile. I used to wear some (non-brand name) clogs. My podiatrist told me that clogs are terrible on your feet for some reason or another, so I switched to tennis shoes with one of those gel inserts. I find them much more comfortable.

The major stress on your feet in the OR is standing in the same spot without being able to move for a long period of time. I liked that I could take my foot out of the clog for a bit while I was standing.
 

cbgray

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I have seen plenty of people in ORs and the hospital wearing painted clogs, some even with more aggressive designs like flames. I don't really understand it because I personally find them all hideous... :rolleyes:

Anyway, do you really need to pop $120 for shoes for one rotation? Get the Crocs, they are like $12 at Payless!
 
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MissionComplete

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FLAMES? That's awesome! Do you have a pic of that?
 

cbgray

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FLAMES? That's awesome! Do you have a pic of that?
Haha, no I don't. I think I remember my friend in nursing school saying that she found them on eBay, though...
 

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cbgray said:
Anyway, do you really need to pop $120 for shoes for one rotation? Get the Crocs, they are like $12 at Payless!
:) :thumbup:

They're a lot lighter, too.
 

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I am only a first year but my true love of my danskos prompted me to answer anyway. I first purchased mine to wait tables in. They seemed weird at first but as they broke in a bit and I got used to their strange fit (the heel is supposed to be loose so it can slide on and off) I grew to love them. I could work a double and my feet would be fine. Then I got my job working as a clinical research coordinator. I tried for a while to be all cute in clinic but my feet would end up killin me, so I started wearing my danskos with nice dressy slacks that were tailored to cover all but the toe of my shoe, and the didn't look sexy or anything but I don't think they made me look unproffessional or dressed down, and my feet weren't killing me by the end of clinic. I plan on wearing those same danskos that are now two years old as a medstudent when I do clinical rotations.
 

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Hey there,
General Surgery resident here and I would never operate without my Birkie Boston's. Comfy and I can slip my foot out for a bit of refreshement on those long cases. Coupled with my T.E.D. hose and I am set for the day!

I have a pair of Danskos but they are better for walking than standing in one place. I also feel like I am pitching forward if I stand to long in the Danskos.

My favorite ward wear is actually my cowboy boots. My backcut pythons are great for tromping the halls. Good arch support and very comfy. The are just too hot for the OR.

At night, I am in my Dr. Scholl exercise sandles so I can hop out of the bed in the call room and check out things without putting my boots back on.

njbmd :)
 

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Again, I have to pimp out my Merrell clogs...they're awesome, cheaper and lighter than Dansko's, plus they have decent support for all day lab work. If you really want good support go to amsterdam and buy some wooden clogs
 

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MissionComplete said:
Hi!

I'm about to start surgery next month and everyone says that you're supposed to get Dansko clogs. Anyone have any insight on these? Are they really the best? They seem like they range from $100-$250. Could I wear painted ones like these or would they be really unprofessional?

Has anyone tried the Calzuro's?

Has anyone tried the Croc's? These seem the cheapest so I could buy a couple different colors to swap around, etc...

For anyone who's on surgery, what do people do? Do they wear them with slack/skirts or do they only wear them with scrubs. Do people wear them on medicine? I'm on optho now so I'm not even in the hospital and have to be super dressed everyday so insight is definitely needed! :D

Thanks again!
Clogs are gay.

Wear tennis shoes.
 
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I have a pair of Dansko clogs. Initially, they took some getting used to, but now that they're broken in, they're wonderful. I wear them whenever I'm going to be standing around a lot in clinic; they keep my feet from hurting.

As to professional looks, I wouldn't worry too much. Mine are green. I've never had any complaints. :)

PS: if you're on surgery, you'll be covering 'em up with little booties half the time anyway.
 

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Dansko's are great -- but you have to watch that you don't evert your foot. Basically, the high arches save your back, but leave you liable to twist your ankle. Once you're used to them, though, they're gold.

I'd stay away from anything that would keep me from being able to scrub the heck out of my clogs with a brush -- my guess is anything painted or patterned would do that. You'll get blood on them at some point.

Best,
Anka
 

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Crocs are comfy and cheap...plan on using them only in the OR though...or the beach
 

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Have worn a dozen different types of shoes. The problem with 'tennis shoes' (at least explained by ortho/podiatrists and others) is that the shoe is designed for you to walk/run and thus puts you in line for being propelled forward, they aren't geared to stand. Back in teh 'day' when I had to do 36 on, I found that not only haveing comfortable shoes to be vital, having a second pair really helped. Almost any shoe will be uncomfortable for 36 hours straight.

Incidentally, I'm buying some danskos because its easier to look professional in them for clinic/etc. I have merrills which I like but they look like tennies
 

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i need to ask:

all you who wear clogs are girls, right?
 

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YouDontKnowJack said:
i need to ask:

all you who wear clogs are girls, right?
I sure hope so...
 
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Blade28

njbmd said:
My favorite ward wear is actually my cowboy boots. My backcut pythons are great for tromping the halls. Good arch support and very comfy. The are just too hot for the OR.
I've seen a few attendings who swear by their cowboy boots. Apparently, they're tough to break in, but once they are they're supposed to be more comfortable than sneakers/clogs.
 

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Be careful and try on a pair of Danskos before you buy them - I have a $100 pair of clogs in my closet that I've worn like three times.

I really like my Modellistas - I've already bought two pairs of them and will never try another pair of clogs again!
 

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YouDontKnowJack said:
i need to ask:

all you who wear clogs are girls, right?
I see guys in Danskos at my hospital all the time.
 

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I'm a huge fan of the Danskos Professionals myself. Does take awhile to break them in and adjust, but they did wonders for me. Able to stand all day and most of the night without a problem for those long IR days.
 
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MissionComplete

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Jim Picotte said:
I'm a huge fan of the Danskos Professionals myself. Does take awhile to break them in and adjust, but they did wonders for me. Able to stand all day and most of the night without a problem for those long IR days.
How do you clean them?
 

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MissionComplete said:
Hi!

I'm about to start surgery next month and everyone says that you're supposed to get Dansko clogs. Anyone have any insight on these? Are they really the best? They seem like they range from $100-$250. Could I wear painted ones like these or would they be really unprofessional?

Has anyone tried the Calzuro's?

Has anyone tried the Croc's? These seem the cheapest so I could buy a couple different colors to swap around, etc...

For anyone who's on surgery, what do people do? Do they wear them with slack/skirts or do they only wear them with scrubs. Do people wear them on medicine? I'm on optho now so I'm not even in the hospital and have to be super dressed everyday so insight is definitely needed! :D

Thanks again!
Hi there,
If you click on The Washington Post, there is an article on Crocs and their development. It is under the "Health" Section. It made for interesting reading. See below:

"Not Such A Croc
Might a Fad Shoe's Health Claims Stand?

By Jennifer Huget
Special to The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 1, 2006; HE01

You've tried to ignore them, but they've spread like vermin. Crocs are everywhere. That's often the way with shoe crazes -- think Birkenstocks, Earth shoes, Dr. Scholl's. Crocs wearers are practically evangelical about the shoes' supposed comfort, but really, how can you trust people who go out in public wearing goofy rubbery clogs with vent holes in them? Might as well ascribe health benefits to chopped-off garden galoshes or jelly shoes.

Time to call in the foot experts and expose the things for the frauds they are. Except -- surprise -- that turns out to be more difficult than you might imagine.

Crocs, made of a resin foam called Croslite and listing for $29.99, are featured prominently on the Web site of the Bethesda-based American Podiatric Medical Association ( http://www.apma.org/ ) as one healthy alternative to flip-flops; two Crocs models -- both in the Crocs Rx line, designed for people with diabetes and others with circulatory and foot ailments -- recently have been awarded the APMA Seal of Acceptance. The APMA takes special note of the fact that Croslite "warms and softens with body heat and molds to the users' feet, while remaining extremely lightweight."

Harold Glickman, chief of podiatric surgery at Sibley Memorial Hospital, praises Crocs for their ample toe room, deep and supportive heel cup and secure rear strap. Their loose fit, he said, means no pressure points or rubbing spots, and their nonporous material gives them antibacterial properties that makes them "a huge asset to those susceptible to infection -- those with diabetic ulcerations, wounds or poor circulation."

Glickman, who isn't among the physicians who have partnered with the makers of Crocs to stock the shoes in their offices, began recommending them to patients after he began wearing them himself. "I found them myself to be so comfortable, a bell went off." Now he suggests them to people with plantar fasciitis, a painful stretching of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, and to those undergoing bunionectomies or other foot surgery. "The patient can go right into them post-operatively, bandage and all."

Glickman's sold on Crocs for the healthy-footed, too. Their stable foot bed, he says, prevents wobbling and excessive pronation -- in which body weight falls on the inner edge of the sole, causing ankle, knee and low-back pain. He also says they make a good alternative to flexible bedroom slippers, which he calls a "major cause of foot problems."

The shoes have also been certified by United States Ergonomics ( http://www.us-ergo.com/home.asp ), which Crocs paid to test their capacity for efficient and safe use. In a study in which participants wore both Crocs and the most comfortable footwear they had in their own closets, Crocs caused less muscle fatigue and foot pressure, Ergonomics president Kevin Costello said.

Of course, the whole medical community hasn't gone nuts over Crocs. Several orthopedists contacted for this story had never heard of the shoes. And while Glenn Thomas, a physical therapist at Georgetown University Hospital, says he loves wearing them and "wouldn't hesitate to recommend them to patients," he admits that he doesn't know for sure of any great health benefit tied to Crocs.

Nor is the fashion world enamored of Crocs. Though their maker touts their "ultra-hip Italian styling," lots of folks find them hideous, as evidenced on blogs like http://kelly.typepad.com/kelly/2006/06/to_croc_or_not_.html , where Croc-bashers abound. And don't get Stacy London, co-host of The Learning Channel's "What Not to Wear," started. London knocks Crocs for making wearers' legs look heavy and short and notes that there are other "comfort shoes" that are more flattering.

Crocs were launched in 2002 when three sailing buddies -- one wearing clogs made by a company called Foam Creations -- decided to go into the shoe business. Sold on the clogs' skid-resistant, non-marking soles, vent holes, light weight, quick drying speed and built-in antibacterial to ward off stink, the guys bought the rights to the shoes (they eventually bought the company as well) and started peddling the boat shoes under the name Crocs.

Even without advertising, word spread to others who spend lots of time on their feet. Restaurant workers were early adopters, as were doctors and nurses, for whom closed-top Crocs, without the upper vent holes, were developed; Crocs issued colors such as sage and light blue to match surgical scrubs. Celebrity chef Mario Batali is among the shoes' most prominent (and unpaid) proponents. Crocs Inc. expects sales of around $200 million in 2006.

(Disclosure: Acting on a tip from my best friend, I got my first Crocs last winter. My chronic low-back pain disappeared quickly. I now own two pairs -- as do my daughter, son and normally conservative husband.)

Crocs co-founder Duke Hanson says he and his sailing buddies didn't set out to create an orthopedic shoe but discovered their foot-friendly attributes as they went along. He likes the fact that the Crocs Rx models, which feature a softer foot bed and wider toe box and sell for $39.95 at http://www.crocs.com/ , provide people with ailing feet a comfortable footwear option at a reasonable price.

In the end, though, the Crocs cachet isn't about orthopedics. Says Hanson, "You feel like you're part of a group when you're wearing them." ·

Jennifer Huget is a frequent contributor to Health. Comments:[email protected]
© 2006 The Washington Post Company"


njbmd :)
 

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Suffering from terrible low-back pain, I quickly purchased a pair of Birkenstock Professional clogs. While initially my feet killed (I went straight into wearing them for 8-12 hour shifts), the moment they were broken in (3-4 days) they became much more comfortable. And need I mention that my lower back pain has disappeared while wearing them? I haven't taken even 200mg of Motrin since getting them -- down from 600mg while still suffering from an aching back.

As far as fashion goes -- they look perfectly fine with scrubs. In fact, they help give more of a loose fit in the scrub bottoms, as opposed to the straight-leg look my tennis shoes gave. But now Danskos...Those are truly some girly looking shoes. Doesn't stop 80% of the nurses and doctors in my department from wearing them, though.
 

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I vouch for my Dansko pro clogs. They're the box leather, so I can just kind of hose them off if they get bloody.

I try to rotate shoes every day, so I have Crocs, tennis shoes, and my Danskos. I save the Danskos for nights I'm on call. I saw an attending with a tennis shoe the other day that had blood soaked through the fabric, so be sure you're careful what materials your shoes are made of.

My best advice is to try the shoes on first. Maybe find a shoe store that has a good return policy in case you don't like them later. I swear by the Danskos but I realize not everyone finds them comfortable. I see people every day in New Balance tennies, Merrell clogs/tennies, Birkenstocks (especially the plasticky clog type--watch out for the suede), Crocs, and other forms of footwear. Just find several different shoes you like, rotate them out.

One more thing: pay attention to socks when trying on your shoes. I rotate out between thick sports-type socks and knee-high support hose (for call nights). Make sure your shoes work with your socks.
 

mountainman123

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I have two pairs of the Dansko professionals that I bought on a recommendation from surgeons and other doctors and my back problems are pretty much gone. I have tried the Z-coil shoes, other expensive "comfortable" shoes mentioned and I would and do recommend the Danskos to everyone who stands for any length of time. My fiance also has two pairs that she bought after me and she has always had horrible back and neck problems and these are miracle workers for her as she is a nurse. I would never do without them, they are well worth the money in my opinion.
 
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MissionComplete

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Hmm, very cool.

What do you use to clean them? Like if you get blood or poop on them?

njbmd said:
Hi there,
If you click on The Washington Post, there is an article on Crocs and their development. It is under the "Health" Section. It made for interesting reading. See below:

"Not Such A Croc
Might a Fad Shoe's Health Claims Stand?

By Jennifer Huget
Special to The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 1, 2006; HE01

You've tried to ignore them, but they've spread like vermin. Crocs are everywhere. That's often the way with shoe crazes -- think Birkenstocks, Earth shoes, Dr. Scholl's. Crocs wearers are practically evangelical about the shoes' supposed comfort, but really, how can you trust people who go out in public wearing goofy rubbery clogs with vent holes in them? Might as well ascribe health benefits to chopped-off garden galoshes or jelly shoes.

Time to call in the foot experts and expose the things for the frauds they are. Except -- surprise -- that turns out to be more difficult than you might imagine.

Crocs, made of a resin foam called Croslite and listing for $29.99, are featured prominently on the Web site of the Bethesda-based American Podiatric Medical Association ( http://www.apma.org/ ) as one healthy alternative to flip-flops; two Crocs models -- both in the Crocs Rx line, designed for people with diabetes and others with circulatory and foot ailments -- recently have been awarded the APMA Seal of Acceptance. The APMA takes special note of the fact that Croslite "warms and softens with body heat and molds to the users' feet, while remaining extremely lightweight."

Harold Glickman, chief of podiatric surgery at Sibley Memorial Hospital, praises Crocs for their ample toe room, deep and supportive heel cup and secure rear strap. Their loose fit, he said, means no pressure points or rubbing spots, and their nonporous material gives them antibacterial properties that makes them "a huge asset to those susceptible to infection -- those with diabetic ulcerations, wounds or poor circulation."

Glickman, who isn't among the physicians who have partnered with the makers of Crocs to stock the shoes in their offices, began recommending them to patients after he began wearing them himself. "I found them myself to be so comfortable, a bell went off." Now he suggests them to people with plantar fasciitis, a painful stretching of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, and to those undergoing bunionectomies or other foot surgery. "The patient can go right into them post-operatively, bandage and all."

Glickman's sold on Crocs for the healthy-footed, too. Their stable foot bed, he says, prevents wobbling and excessive pronation -- in which body weight falls on the inner edge of the sole, causing ankle, knee and low-back pain. He also says they make a good alternative to flexible bedroom slippers, which he calls a "major cause of foot problems."

The shoes have also been certified by United States Ergonomics ( http://www.us-ergo.com/home.asp ), which Crocs paid to test their capacity for efficient and safe use. In a study in which participants wore both Crocs and the most comfortable footwear they had in their own closets, Crocs caused less muscle fatigue and foot pressure, Ergonomics president Kevin Costello said.

Of course, the whole medical community hasn't gone nuts over Crocs. Several orthopedists contacted for this story had never heard of the shoes. And while Glenn Thomas, a physical therapist at Georgetown University Hospital, says he loves wearing them and "wouldn't hesitate to recommend them to patients," he admits that he doesn't know for sure of any great health benefit tied to Crocs.

Nor is the fashion world enamored of Crocs. Though their maker touts their "ultra-hip Italian styling," lots of folks find them hideous, as evidenced on blogs like http://kelly.typepad.com/kelly/2006/06/to_croc_or_not_.html , where Croc-bashers abound. And don't get Stacy London, co-host of The Learning Channel's "What Not to Wear," started. London knocks Crocs for making wearers' legs look heavy and short and notes that there are other "comfort shoes" that are more flattering.

Crocs were launched in 2002 when three sailing buddies -- one wearing clogs made by a company called Foam Creations -- decided to go into the shoe business. Sold on the clogs' skid-resistant, non-marking soles, vent holes, light weight, quick drying speed and built-in antibacterial to ward off stink, the guys bought the rights to the shoes (they eventually bought the company as well) and started peddling the boat shoes under the name Crocs.

Even without advertising, word spread to others who spend lots of time on their feet. Restaurant workers were early adopters, as were doctors and nurses, for whom closed-top Crocs, without the upper vent holes, were developed; Crocs issued colors such as sage and light blue to match surgical scrubs. Celebrity chef Mario Batali is among the shoes' most prominent (and unpaid) proponents. Crocs Inc. expects sales of around $200 million in 2006.

(Disclosure: Acting on a tip from my best friend, I got my first Crocs last winter. My chronic low-back pain disappeared quickly. I now own two pairs -- as do my daughter, son and normally conservative husband.)

Crocs co-founder Duke Hanson says he and his sailing buddies didn't set out to create an orthopedic shoe but discovered their foot-friendly attributes as they went along. He likes the fact that the Crocs Rx models, which feature a softer foot bed and wider toe box and sell for $39.95 at http://www.crocs.com/ , provide people with ailing feet a comfortable footwear option at a reasonable price.

In the end, though, the Crocs cachet isn't about orthopedics. Says Hanson, "You feel like you're part of a group when you're wearing them." ·

Jennifer Huget is a frequent contributor to Health. Comments:[email protected]
© 2006 The Washington Post Company"


njbmd :)
 
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