Chemdude

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I'm generally a clumsy person, and I also tend to get flustered when I am under pressure. I'm sort of nervous about how this will affect my clinical skills...can clumsiness be a big problem during medical school (and beyond)?
 

CaptainSSO

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Yea of course, if you're doing procedures and/or surgery.

Could you really not figure this out on your own?

Would you want your surgeon to be clumsy? "Whoops, just accidentally cut the abdominal aorta!! Dang I'm so clumsy." Or the ER doc stitching up the gash on your forehead?

Obviously you're going to be practicing and learning techniques so at some point you'll have it down, but it depends on how "clumsy" you are--e.g., if you have trouble holding a pencil there's not a lot of hope for you.

I'm guessing you are pretty bad since you specifically made a thread about this.

However, there are plenty of specialties where it won't matter. Psychiatry, diagnostic radiology, and a lot of others. Again, it's dependent on what exactly you mean by clumsy.
 
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Chemdude

Chemdude

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Yea of course, if you're doing procedures and/or surgery.

Could you really not figure this out on your own?

Would you want your surgeon to be clumsy? "Whoops, just accidentally cut the abdominal aorta!! Dang I'm so clumsy." Or the ER doc stitching up the gash on your forehead?

Obviously you're going to be practicing and learning techniques so at some point you'll have it down, but it depends on how "clumsy" you are--e.g., if you have trouble holding a pencil there's not a lot of hope for you.

I'm guessing you are pretty bad since you specifically made a thread about this.

However, there are plenty of specialties where it won't matter. Psychiatry, diagnostic radiology, and a lot of others. Again, it's dependent on what exactly you mean by clumsy.
No need to be condescending. I created this thread to see of if any current medical students have the same problem and could offer some advice. And I am definitely capable of holding a pencil...could you really not figure this out on your own?
 

armybound

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it's been my experience that people don't give you too many options to do many procedures or practice/learn many technical skills. you'll get the chance to sew some skin if you want to. I don't think they expect you to be very good at it. aside from that, you probably won't be put in many situations where your clumsiness will really show, unfortunately.

I have found that I get a little nervous when babies are about to be delivered and my hands get decently shaky and I'm pretty tachycardic when trying to get ready to help deliver. It's very obvious to me but I doubt anybody else in the room even notices.
 

CaptainSSO

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No need to be condescending. I created this thread to see of if any current medical students have the same problem and could offer some advice. And I am definitely capable of holding a pencil...could you really not figure this out on your own?
"e.g." means "exempli gratia" which means "for example." I was outlining a hypothetical situation, not yours specifically.

: http://m.dictionary.com/d/?q=rhetoric&o=0&l=dir

Not trying to be condescending--threads like this confuse me. I mean, what kind of answers are you expecting that you can't figure out on your own?
 
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greg1184

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I am not a procedure person. I admit I get a bit anxious regarding doing things to patients. I get frustrated even doing venipuncture. Though I am much better at using the butterfly type vs the regular needle because it tells you when you have reached blood! For whatever reason it is not used often. I did get 20cc in blood the first time I ever did a femoral stick. I am proud of that!

Anyway, you will get a few opportunities to try out skills during MS3, especially during surgery. If you are finding difficulties doing so, don't be discouraged. Residents are generally helpful. I have a hard time suturing, and it is being harder being a Lefty with the suture kits designed for right handed people! Try your best to be confident and take advantage of being a med student.

Worse comes to worse, there are specialties where procedures are few or none. Medicine in general has a niche for all types of personality.
 

dr zaius

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"e.g." means "exempli gratia" which means "for example." I was outlining a hypothetical situation, not yours specifically.

: http://m.dictionary.com/d/?q=rhetoric&o=0&l=dir

Not trying to be condescending--threads like this confuse me. I mean, what kind of answers are you expecting that you can't figure out on your own?
I wonder that as well.

"I have trouble studying. Will this hurt me in medical school?" Nah man. It's cool.

I've found that those questions turn up more when the pre-allo kids trickle into allo. Luckily most learn their lesson and the board doesn't get shat upon like pre-allo.
 

jcu

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You'll have a few years to hone these skills. The majority of med. students tend to initially be a little clumsy. But, repetition breeds accuracy. And once you develop a solid clinical foundation, you'll feel more confident and less flustered under pressure. As long as you're aware of your shortcomings and work to correct them over time, you're off to a good start.

(Go Big Red)
 
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Chemdude

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I wonder that as well.

"I have trouble studying. Will this hurt me in medical school?" Nah man. It's cool.

I've found that those questions turn up more when the pre-allo kids trickle into allo. Luckily most learn their lesson and the board doesn't get shat upon like pre-allo.
Thank you for your helpful response, oh all-knowledgeable medical student. If you think that my original question is rudimentary, you should not have wasted your time by posting in this thread. I found Armybound and greg1184's really helpful. That's the type of insight I was looking for...
 
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Chemdude

Chemdude

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you'll have a few years to hone these skills. The majority of med. Students tend to initially be a little clumsy. But, repetition breeds accuracy. And once you develop a solid clinical foundation, you'll feel more confident and less flustered under pressure. As long as you're aware of your shortcomings and work to correct them over time, you're off to a good start.

(go big red)
amen!
 

dr zaius

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Thank you for your helpful response, oh all-knowledgeable medical student. If you think that my original question is rudimentary, you should not have wasted your time by posting in this thread. I found Armybound and greg1184's really helpful. That's the type of insight I was looking for...
We were all that pre-med at some point or another.
 

jumpmanv15

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I'm generally a clumsy person, and I also tend to get flustered when I am under pressure. I'm sort of nervous about how this will affect my clinical skills...can clumsiness be a big problem during medical school (and beyond)?
Don't worry, just takes time, experience and persistence.
 

CaptainSSO

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I wonder that as well.

"I have trouble studying. Will this hurt me in medical school?" Nah man. It's cool.

.
Haha. Exactly.