Azjoe

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Does anyone know how long a typical CNA program takes? I was thinking it would be a nice little side gig.
 

Krazykritter

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In undergrad, I took one at an area Community College 2-3 nights/week for ~6 weeks. As a side note, if you can read & use 2% of your brain you should not even have to look at a book & still ace the class....Makes me kind of wonder about some of the people who can take care of our grandparents in nursing facilities? :(
 
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jstuds_66

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Krazykritter said:
In undergrad, I took one at an area Community College 2-3 nights/week for ~6 weeks. As a side note, if you can read & use 2% of your brain you should not even have to look at a book & still ace the class....Makes me kind of wonder about some of the people who can take care of our grandparents in nursing facilities? :(
I totally agree!! I was a CNA in a nursing home. It really was a no brainer course. However, if you have the kind of experience I had, it is totally worth it! I loved the time I spent working as a CNA in a nursing home. Actually, I'm using my CNA as a certification so I can do more things in a pain clinic. I would recommend getting CNA to anybody because you never know what kind of opportunities will come up. I believe that CNA's at hospitals in CA get paid $14+ per hour. It's definitely worth to get that kind of experience.
 

Carmenita79

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In WA CNA classes are 85 hours, so you could conceivably finish in a little more than 2 weeks. Check your local nursing homes they usually have classes for free and they are typically the shortest (+ they will probably offer you a job when you are finished).
 

Johnny_one_eye

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I'm finishing my clinical rotations tomorrow. I took a course in summer school that lasted from June 14th - August 2 (including classroom parts and clinicals). The class was 3 days a week 9am-4pm. Mornings were lecture/discussions, afternoons were skills training labs from 6/14-7/13, then from 7/18-8/2 we had clinicals which were also 3 days/week 9-4 at a nursing home and at a center for mentally handicapped children. I'll be taking out state exam in early Sept.
 

rachmoninov3

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Having both the EMT-b and CNA, let me just say this: As a CNA you can make big $ if you get in with a temp agency. It's rare that I have a night at work that doesn't include working with an 'agency' CNA.

You can learn more (assuming you get out of a nursing home and work in a hospital), by reading the charts (H&Ps, Labs, Progress notes...), and you still get a little of the adrenaline rush from time to time in code situations.

More $, more knowledge, but the trade off, is that EMS people are just cooler to work with. Some nurses still believe in the Healthcare Caste system, so that can be a drag, but mostly, they love teaching, and are a great help. The other down side, of course, is adult diaper changes, and people withdrawing who like to use their *full* foley cath as a gauntlet (yes, I have seen this). And of course, people just think the EMT is cooler, but I can tell you, I've had sicker patients, and have worked more codes as a CNA than as an EMT (sickest patients are taken care of by medics, and you're just driving).
 

obrn

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Depending on what area you are interested in, something else that you can potentially do for some clinical experience is work as a scrub/OR tech. There are usually classes that last around 6 weeks offered at some community colleges that teach you about this, and after that you can find a job at a hospital, or working with a private surgeon/group as there are many that have a few that work for them that they use as the first assist in surgical cases. There are also scrub/OR techs that are hired by the hospital that are part of every surgery that goes on as well. I would imagine that this is something that would be more interesting for those that want to work in the OR, but it would teach you a lot about different things and provide you with some clinical experience.
 

deuist

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Krazykritter said:
In undergrad, I took one at an area Community College 2-3 nights/week for ~6 weeks. As a side note, if you can read & use 2% of your brain you should not even have to look at a book & still ace the class....Makes me kind of wonder about some of the people who can take care of our grandparents in nursing facilities? :(
Until just a few years ago, the state of Florida did not require the class. I signed up for the exam and studied the pamphlet that the Department of Health sent me. I passed and then went on to work in a hospital where I had no idea what I was doing. Much of my day revolved around wondering how everything worked. My own ignorance aside, there is no way that 6 weeks is required to learn everything that there is to do as a CNA. I imagine a good weekend course should be able to hammer out all of the basics.
 
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