aumed22

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 19, 2004
199
1
Status
Hey everyone, I was talking to a doctor this weekend who had worked up in New York for a while. He told me not to apply to Columbia because their main hospital is in some financial trouble. Has anyone else heard this, or can someone give me a little bit more information on the situation up there? Thanks.
 

SarahGM

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 20, 2003
863
1
39
upper upper UPPER west side
Visit site
Status
aumed22 said:
Hey everyone, I was talking to a doctor this weekend who had worked up in New York for a while. He told me not to apply to Columbia because their main hospital is in some financial trouble. Has anyone else heard this, or can someone give me a little bit more information on the situation up there? Thanks.
Nope, never heard this. But if New York-Presbyterian is in trouble, I think we're all in trouble!
 

pjm

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2004
136
0
NYC
Status
Resident [Any Field]
As far as I know, it's the reverse - New York-Presbyterian Hospital is doing really well compared to other New York City hospitals.

Most hospital mergers are terrible. Mt. Sinai and NYU tried to merge hospitals and medical schools, and gave up after three years. Stanford and UCSF tried to merge hospitals, and that didn't go well at all. The merged NYPH is working at well, according to the article below.

The major future financial pressures are the same ones that every large urban hospital faces - cuts in state and federal Medicare/Medicaid financing, which pays for an awful lot of patients.

This article appeared in the New York Sun:

Inside a Hospital Merger That Works
By WILLIAM F. HAMMOND JR. Staff Reporter of the Sun
18 February 2004

They got engaged eight years ago, when all of their colleagues seemed to be doing the same thing. One hailed from a poor neighborhood in northern Manhattan, the other from the well-to-do East Side. Money has been tight since they tied the knot, and many couples in their social circle have split up.

Yet somehow Presbyterian Hospital and New York Hospital are making their marriage work.

The 2,400-bed combined institution, known as New York-Presbyterian, has not only become the largest hospital in New York City - treating one out of every five patients here - but also the city's largest private-sector employer, with 13,800 people on the payroll.

While the industry as a whole struggles with deficits, New York-Presbyterian operates comfortably in the black, with yearly revenues of about $2 billion. And it is the only institution in New York that consistently makes the honor roll of the best multi-specialty hospitals published by U.S. News & World Report.
...

Officials at NewYork-Presbyterian say they have struck a balance between those extremes: They thoroughly integrated the administrative functions of the two hospitals, but allowed the affiliated medical schools - Cornell's Weill Medical College at New York Hospital, and Columbia's College of Physicians & Surgeons at Presbyterian - to remain independent. Physicians in the clinical departments at the two campuses are expected to work together on some things, such as quality control, but otherwise can continue operating separately if they wish.