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Keepitclassy

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Apr 20, 2012
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Hey guys, as the title states I was wondering which of the following would be the best method to overcome a low undergraduate GPA to gain consideration to an allopathic medical school.

At the moment I'm looking to graduate with a roughly a 3.0 cGPA/3.1 sGPA (Positive trend of 3.75 cGPA/3.7 sGPA over the last 55 Credit Hours).

Assuming average MCAT (30/31) & Strong EC's, what's the best way to go about making up for the lackluster performance during my freshman/sophomore years?

One year of Post-Bac classes (36 hours) would raise me to a 3.25 cGPA/3.35 sGPA assuming straight A's across the board, and two years of post-bac (72 hours) would bring me to a 3.4 cGPA/3.45 sGPA, which still falls short of average GPA of matriculants in regards to allopathic schools.

For SMP's, would attending anywhere other than the biggies (GT/Loyola/Tufts/Cinc) even be worth it? Per my knowledge, the masters you obtain from completing an SMP is practically useless, so I'd be attending strictly for med school admissions.

From what I've read as well, finishing a Master's programs strongly (3.7+) doesn't make up for a low undergraduate GPA, although depending on the master's degree, it can be a nice fallback.

Any and all advice is greatly appreciated, thanks! :rolleyes:
 

Shalashaska

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I would definitely do the post-bacc for 1-2 years. That's what I plan to do. SMPs without linkage are risky. Master's won't do much but give you a 2-year EC.
 

Keepitclassy

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I would definitely do the post-bacc for 1-2 years. That's what I plan to do. SMPs without linkage are risky. Master's won't do much but give you a 2-year EC.

Would an SMP with linkage or a more renowned non-linkage SMP (Tufts/BU/GT/Loyola) be more beneficial than a 1-2 year post-bacc?
 
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Hey guys, as the title states I was wondering which of the following would be the best method to overcome a low undergraduate GPA to gain consideration to an allopathic medical school.

At the moment I'm looking to graduate with a roughly a 3.0 cGPA/3.1 sGPA (Positive trend of 3.75 cGPA/3.7 sGPA over the last 55 Credit Hours).

Assuming average MCAT (30/31) & Strong EC's, what's the best way to go about making up for the lackluster performance during my freshman/sophomore years?

One year of Post-Bac classes (36 hours) would raise me to a 3.25 cGPA/3.35 sGPA assuming straight A's across the board, and two years of post-bac (72 hours) would bring me to a 3.4 cGPA/3.45 sGPA, which still falls short of average GPA of matriculants in regards to allopathic schools.

For SMP's, would attending anywhere other than the biggies (GT/Loyola/Tufts/Cinc) even be worth it? Per my knowledge, the masters you obtain from completing an SMP is practically useless, so I'd be attending strictly for med school admissions.

From what I've read as well, finishing a Master's programs strongly (3.7+) doesn't make up for a low undergraduate GPA, although depending on the master's degree, it can be a nice fallback.

Any and all advice is greatly appreciated, thanks! :rolleyes:

Yeah, as long as they have a linkage. Umich, case western, and many of the other non-linkage programs are scams (you really get nothing from them). You can do great, but schools will still not accept you because of your GPA (unless your MCAT is godly).

GT is actually brutally low for linkage (bad choice if your not someone who will bust your a and get all honors), for cinci you'll need a 33+ mcat with that GPA, tufts is very competitive once your in, and loyola's is a joke.

Do your research! You can see all of them from the AMCAS site under post-bachs.

SMPs are great. Post-bachs don't really give you much and would require 3+ years to restore that GPA. If you want to go US MD, then do an SMP. Otherwise, suck it up, do grade replacement and pray for DO.

Check out toledo, they keep 60-70% of their smp students (arguably the best one in the country as far as linkage, and actually the first one - early 90s).
 
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235788

Do not bother with an SMP that doesn't let you take actual medical courses along with the MS1s. Drexel, GT, and I believe Cinci all fit this model. IMO, you get more bang for your buck and actually get to prove you can handle med school.





You take biochem, histology, and something else with the m1's at the cinci SMP. But if he's not an ohio resident, he'll need a greater than average mcat to be considered.
 

mduck

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Do not bother with an SMP that doesn't let you take actual medical courses along with the MS1s. Drexel, GT, and I believe Cinci all fit this model. IMO, you get more bang for your buck and actually get to prove you can handle med school.

Also Tufts (which isn't competitive, by the way).
 

TheMightySmiter

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If you already have a year or two of very good grades (3.6+) it seems like a post-bacc filled with excellent science grades could help you quite a bit, especially if you have a good reason for your slow start. If you don't already have an upward grade trend and don't want to spend two or more years getting one in a post-bacc program, I think an SMP is your best bet--provided you are willing to bust your butt to get an excellent academic record while in the program. SMPs are expensive and usually a last resort for people with good MCAT scores. If the rest of your application is very strong (MCAT, LORs, ECs) I think a post-bacc is generally a better use of your money.
 

Arbor Vitae

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I would definitely do the post-bacc for 1-2 years. That's what I plan to do. SMPs without linkage are risky. Master's won't do much but give you a 2-year EC.

I disagree with this statement. If you end up not getting in to medical, at least you would have a master's to fall back on. A SMP or post-bacc really wouldn't be too practical in any industry. I think adcoms will recognize this fact as well. I would think a good GPA in upper division courses for 2 years would be equal whether it be post-bacc or hard-science master's.

In my molecular bio master's program I am doing a 2.5 year thesis in a molecular cardiology lab. I have also been a lab instructor for human anatomy for 5 semesters. I will have 1 first author pub because of it, and if I don't get in to med school at least I can find a decent job.

I would value that more than any post-bacc, but maybe the right SMP can get your foot in the door.
 

Shalashaska

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Yes MuAgonist, I agree with you. A master's opens up another career path if medical school is not achieved. I made that statement under the assumption that the OP wanted to pursue medicine and nothing but medicine. However, I also made that statement for the purpose that a regular master's degree would not help someone with a low GPA.
 

Keepitclassy

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Also Tufts (which isn't competitive, by the way).

Couldn't find the acceptance rates and class profile in terms of average GPA/MCAT etc. but I'd assume Tufts would be fairly competitive seeing as it's a top 30 overall

If you already have a year or two of very good grades (3.6+) it seems like a post-bacc filled with excellent science grades could help you quite a bit, especially if you have a good reason for your slow start. If you don't already have an upward grade trend and don't want to spend two or more years getting one in a post-bacc program, I think an SMP is your best bet--provided you are willing to bust your butt to get an excellent academic record while in the program. SMPs are expensive and usually a last resort for people with good MCAT scores. If the rest of your application is very strong (MCAT, LORs, ECs) I think a post-bacc is generally a better use of your money.

Like I stated in the OP, my last 55 credit hours will have totalled to ~3.75 cGPA/3.7 sGPA. However, that only brings my overall up to a measly 3.0. I have strong EC's, plenty of time set aside for the MCAT so I should score at least a ~30 considering I've been nailing 32-37 on practice exams and still have a lot of studying/reviewing I wish to do.

Pretty much, the only main concern on my application is my GPA, which is why I was wondering what the best route would be upon graduation.

I disagree with this statement. If you end up not getting in to medical, at least you would have a master's to fall back on. A SMP or post-bacc really wouldn't be too practical in any industry. I think adcoms will recognize this fact as well. I would think a good GPA in upper division courses for 2 years would be equal whether it be post-bacc or hard-science master's.

In my molecular bio master's program I am doing a 2.5 year thesis in a molecular cardiology lab. I have also been a lab instructor for human anatomy for 5 semesters. I will have 1 first author pub because of it, and if I don't get in to med school at least I can find a decent job.

I would value that more than any post-bacc, but maybe the right SMP can get your foot in the door.

That's what I was wondering, and I definitely have considered it. However, since the only problem with my application at this point is my GPA (assuming average MCAT score and good LOR's) I'd still like to pursue the medical route until I exhaust my resources.
 

mduck

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Couldn't find the acceptance rates and class profile in terms of average GPA/MCAT etc. but I'd assume Tufts would be fairly competitive seeing as it's a top 30 overall

I was referring to an earlier post (#5) that said Tufts' SMP was competitive once you're in, which isn't true. I've heard that GT SMP students tend to be pretty cutthroat, but never felt that was the case at Tufts. For the most part, everyone helps each other out.
 

Melomare17

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I was referring to an earlier post (#5) that said Tufts' SMP was competitive once you're in, which isn't true. I've heard that GT SMP students tend to be pretty cutthroat, but never felt that was the case at Tufts. For the most part, everyone helps each other out.

mduck are you a current student at the tufts program and that's how you are basing your statement on?
 
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