Community college prerequisites

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Are they better for non traditional students than a post bacc program?

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It is better to receive pre-requisites from a 4 year university instead of a community college whenever possible. Generally speaking, they are more likely to prepare you better for the MCAT and are viewed more favorably by medical schools. That is not to say that you can't receive any of your pre-req's from a CC, however the majority should come from a 4 year uni, in my opinion. I myself was a non-trad and I received 1 one of pre-req's from a CC due to scheduling and being unable to register at the university. The rest were from my local state university.
 
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They’re cheaper and often offered at night, so they’re good for nontrads who work 9-5 type jobs.


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If the applicant does not appear to have a strong foundation, the committee is less likely to admit the applicant, especially given the competitiveness of the medical school admissions process.

Quote from the above-referenced article. If you take a bunch of pre-req's at a community college and score a 520 on your MCAT, no one is going to think you don't have a strong foundation. The chances of that happening, however, are not great because the community college classes will not prepare you as well.
 
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Quote from the above-referenced article. If you take a bunch of pre-req's at a community college and score a 520 on your MCAT, no one is going to think you don't have a strong foundation. The chances of that happening, however, are not great because the community college classes will not prepare you as well.
I disagree. I think self preparation for the MCAT is more important that what you learn in class. The added benefit of the CC is that the small class sizes for things like Ochem means you basically get a tutor. I originally tried to do a 4-year, but it was impossible with my work schedule.

n=1, but I took both semesters of organic and biology at a CC, and scored a 521; I graduated college in 2005.

There is a difference between someone at a 4-year university taking CC classes because they are easier and a non-trad with a degree from a 4-year that simply has to make up some prereqs. SOME schools look down on them, but there is always context involved. According to the MSAR, Case only accepts CC on a case by case basis (no pun), and I had an II there.
 
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I disagree. I think self preparation for the MCAT is more important that what you learn in class. The added benefit of the CC is that the small class sizes for things like Ochem means you basically get a tutor. I originally tried to do a 4-year, but it was impossible with my work schedule.

n=1, but I took both semesters of organic and biology at a CC, and scored a 521; I graduated college in 2005.

There is a difference between someone at a 4-year university taking CC classes because they are easier and a non-trad with a degree from a 4-year that simply has to make up some prereqs. SOME schools look down on them, but there is always context involved. According to the MSAR, Case only accepts CC on a case by case basis (no pun), and I had an II there.

I didn't say self-prep wasn't more important, I actually think it is. That said, there is little disagreement that most CC courses are not as rigorous. In your case, you could have very well scored a 522+ if you had taken your courses at a 4-year school. You could have also scored lower and still got accepted if an adcom was less biased against your prereqs had you taken them at a 4-year institution.

I have long advocated that non-trads with proven academic skills could take prereqs at CC's and then crush the MCAT, and you proved my point. But that in no way negates the fact that CC classes generally (though not always) are not as rigorous. All things being equal (tuition, convenience, etc), there would be zero reasons to choose a CC over a 4 year, but rarely are all things equal.
 
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I didn't say self-prep wasn't more important, I actually think it is. That said, there is little disagreement that most CC courses are not as rigorous. In your case, you could have very well scored a 522+ if you had taken your courses at a 4-year school. You could have also scored lower and still got accepted if an adcom was less biased against your prereqs had you taken them at a 4-year institution.

I have long advocated that non-trads with proven academic skills could take prereqs at CC's and then crush the MCAT, and you proved my point. But that in no way negates the fact that CC classes generally (though not always) are not as rigorous. All things being equal (tuition, convenience, etc), there would be zero reasons to choose a CC over a 4 year, but rarely are all things equal.
I don't think we are necessarily in disagreement, other than strength of recommendation on the matter.

Yes, all things being equal 4-year institutions are likely to offer better classes, but you may also be in an orgo class with 200 people (mine had 4, then 2 during second semester).

I don't think that there can be a blanket recommendation, in a lot of cases CC classes may be way better for an individual. The article posted earlier kind of alludes to it - the reason why you're at CC for a class matters, a lot.
 
Yo I was a business major and took all of my science classes post-grad school at a CC. It might have mattered a bit on my MD applications but I did not care if I got into a MD or DO program. Not a single school asked me about my CC experience during my interview. They are more interested in why I wanted to be a doctor after being a consultant.
 
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I don't think we are necessarily in disagreement, other than strength of recommendation on the matter.

Yes, all things being equal 4-year institutions are likely to offer better classes, but you may also be in an orgo class with 200 people (mine had 4, then 2 during second semester).

I don't think that there can be a blanket recommendation, in a lot of cases CC classes may be way better for an individual. The article posted earlier kind of alludes to it - the reason why you're at CC for a class matters, a lot.

That's the kicker: why you are there. I would hope most adcoms can see the difference between someone taking them to avoid harder classes and someone taking them at a CC out of practicality. I took my sociology class at a CC and it was great, but I had a really unique prof and I was asked about it on at least one of my applications. I just noted that, as a non-trad, it fit into my schedule better that semester.
 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the general consensus seems to be:
1. Take a few classes at a CC and if there's no discrepancy between performance, no one will care.
2. Taking all classes from a CC is fine, but this will put pressure on other aspects of your academic performance (need a solid MCAT).

OP had a very vague question, we're not sure what they are optimizing for or what their goals are. My personal take is if you have a good reason to take all your classes at a CC, that's fine. But you're taking pressure from one thing and passing it onto another to compensate. In the end of the day, you're trying to convince adcoms that you can handle the academic rigor, and admissions are getting more competitive every day.
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but the general consensus seems to be:
1. Take a few classes at a CC and if there's no discrepancy between performance, no one will care.
2. Taking all classes from a CC is fine, but this will put pressure on other aspects of your academic performance (need a solid MCAT).

OP had a very vague question, we're not sure what they are optimizing for or what their goals are. My personal take is if you have a good reason to take all your classes at a CC, that's fine. But you're taking pressure from one thing and passing it onto another to compensate. In the end of the day, you're trying to convince adcoms that you can handle the academic rigor, and admissions are getting more competitive every day.


^^^^ This

OP since no stats or reasoning as to the “why” for CC or post-bac has been mentioned for yourself, I can only echo what others have reflected: If you attend CC it must correlate to a strong MCAT. Most (not all) prereqs must require more personal study (excluding outliers) than those attending 4-yr institutions.

That being said, I know individuals gaining acceptances going mostly through CC just like some others have mentioned already.

If you could elaborate your situation in more detail perhaps we can cater better to what may be best.
 
^^^^ This

OP since no stats or reasoning as to the “why” for CC or post-bac has been mentioned for yourself, I can only echo what others have reflected: If you attend CC it must correlate to a strong MCAT. Most (not all) prereqs must require more personal study (excluding outliers) than those attending 4-yr institutions.

That being said, I know individuals gaining acceptances going mostly through CC just like some others have mentioned already.

If you could elaborate your situation in more detail perhaps we can cater better to what may be best.

I’m in my late 30s and a have a BS degree (non science) with a 3.0 GPA. All Science coursework comes to a 2.2 GPA.
 
I’m in my late 30s and a have a BS degree (non science) with a 3.0 GPA. All Science coursework comes to a 2.2 GPA.

I personally think you definitely cannot go the cc route with those stats. With a lower gpa than the average, you're already starting with a lot against you.
But others might disagree.
 
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I personally think you definitely cannot go the cc route with those stats. With a lower gpa than the average, you're already starting with a lot against you.
But others might disagree.

Agreed. I got away with CC because of my 3.7+ cGPA and a masters degree. With a 2.2 and CC you will find yourself constantly having to explain that everywhere you go.
 
I will throw my hat back in the ring here as well and say that with those stats, you will not be doing yourself any favors by taking the courses at a CC. Unfortunately, getting into med school is a fickle game and you need to do everything you can to NOT give someone a reason to reject you.
 
I’m in my late 30s and a have a BS degree (non science) with a 3.0 GPA. All Science coursework comes to a 2.2 GPA.

Thank you for the specifics:

It seems like other users already re-stated the points that I would say. That is, you will most certainly have an uphill battle with your stats and attending a CC...Unfortunately that’s just how adcoms will view this with multiple different competitive applicants with higher stats through a 4-year institution...

With that, there’s a difference between not impossible and improbable.
 
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You should gun for DO since it will be an uphill battle for US MD... In any case, have a plan B (i.e. PA or NP).
 
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