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commute distance

Discussion in 'Pathology' started by DocGul, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. DocGul

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    How far can an path resident live from their hospital? or what will be the reasonable and doable commute time?
    Thinking about relocate, I have a huge headache. It is not just about selling house, finding another place to live, there is also child day care issue I have to think about.
     
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  3. DarksideAllstar

    DarksideAllstar you can pay me in bud

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    Most places have a requirement as to how fast you need to be able to get to the hospital when you are on call from home. One that I am familiar with requires that you be within 30 minutes of the hospital if you are paged for a frozen.
     
  4. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian

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    Check with the hospital. Some places have that rule. Others have no rule (at least for pathologists). (but the only one I have heard is the 30 minutes. Of course at my residency most of the attendings could not make it in in 30 minutes. They lived too far out.)
     
  5. yaah

    yaah Boring
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    Our place has some sort of unofficial rule (maybe it's official, maybe it doesn't even exist) that you have to live within an hour. Most residents live less than 20 minutes away. A couple live 50+ minutes away. I am not sure what they do for late night sudden unexpected frozens or having to come in for other reasons. I think it would be a pain in the ass. I have had to come in many times when on call, and a lot of times it's "get here as soon as you can."
     
  6. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian

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    Of note that most people's commute gets a lot faster at 2am. Not much traffic out there..
     
  7. yaah

    yaah Boring
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    The times I was referring to were without traffic!
     
  8. mlw03

    mlw03 Senior Member
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    is traffic that big an issue in ann arbor? personally, the thought of commuting more than 20-25 minutes each way every day is highly unappealing. as much as i enjoy listening to NPR in the morning, i'd much rather have that time to run, enjoy my morning java, read the paper, etc.
     
  9. Villin

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    i'm with you on this one. i commuted close to 2 hours each day for the past 2 years and boy, am i burnt out. i :love: my caffeine and lifting every/every other morning before starting the day and will have a ton more time come residency without the horrendous commute.

    ann arbor has bad traffic due to their roads and not because of the sheer number of people commuting.
     
  10. yaah

    yaah Boring
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    Not really. The major highways that go near are a little bit busy in the mornings and at rush hour, and a few of the streets around the undergrad campus can get pretty cramped. But I very rarely hit too much traffic. My commute is pretty much the same no matter what time I go - at certain times it can get a little longer because of the parking garage, that's about it.
     
  11. b&ierstiefel

    b&ierstiefel Guest

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    Ann Arbor traffic doesn't compare to what I've seen in other places. Taking back roads on the way to the hospital sometimes helps too :) I lived about 5 miles from the hospital complex and I consistently made it to the hospital in around 15 minutes even after catching all those damn red lights!
     
  12. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    Somewhat relatedly, here is Zillow...

    http://www.zillow.com/

    ...to help out with all those questions about property prices across the country.
     
  13. Sean2tall

    Sean2tall Pathology Resident

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    Deschutes, by that sig quote, do you mean to say that Pathologists should work in a visible place so everyone can see/appreciate?

    Not to get too off-topic. :oops:
     
  14. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    (Anyone can get us back on topic at any time. And for posterity, the quote is of Dr. Gaffey saying, "Pathologists should get out of the basement and buy themselves a fishtank.")

    In a word, yes.

    I can't speak for Dr. Gaffey, but in quoting him I meant it as a metaphorical comment on that sticky issue of the image of the pathologist.

    The long and winding answer (don't say you weren't warned) is that I have a theory about pathologists, patient contact and compassion.

    This week for instance a surgeon whacked out a golfball-sized hunk of tissue from a 30+ y/o with a history of VAIN III and sent it along for intraoperative consult. You know, just another specimen on just another day.

    But I can tell you there was a palpable heart-sink in the frozen scope room the moment the slide came into focus - invasive SCC with multiple foci of perineural invasion. And it was "only a slide"!

    But you shake it off and move on. Your role in that case has ended. There are other patients who need your expertise.

    I want to say that for every callous pathologist, there is one who "cares too much". The nature of pathology practice provides the distance they need to function, in a job they find fascinating. Perhaps it's easier for a woman to say this - traditional gender roles has society less accepting of men saying "soft" things like this.

    In a job where internists are known to go:

    "What happened to Patient A, I see he's not on our list?"
    "He died last night."
    "Oh okay, one less to see then."


    ...people would stop thinking you were nuts and start thinking you were frankly weak, if you "cared too much". ("If you can't even handle being in pathology, then you really should get out of medicine completely!" etc.)

    It isn't the most popular opinion and may be easily misinterpreted, but I would argue that it is the people who are able to not care as much who go into clinical medicine, or they would otherwise become rapidly overwhelmed by the immensity of what they were doing (e.g. telling people they or their kid has cancer or a relapse, day after day after day).

    You wouldn't grow a tough exterior if there wasn't something beneath it that needed protecting. And I agree with the poster who said in another thread that they were very very glad they were not out there - which again is not to say that pathologists have any less respect for the clinicians who do what they do every day, we simply like to have our role in patient care acknowledged. (Which is not to say that it isn't.)

    But how do we change the image of pathologists to that of deeply compassionate "people-person"s? I don't think there is an easy answer. Hence the silliness about the fishtank :)

    There! I'll be surprised if anyone reads all that.
     
  15. 1Path

    1Path Banned
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    :thumbup:
     
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  17. jayman

    jayman Member

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    patients suck balls.

    the "distance" is priceless.

    :bullcrap:
     
  18. DarksideAllstar

    DarksideAllstar you can pay me in bud

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    I think that this is less true of people who go into pediatrics. Although they find ways to cope and continue to do their jobs even after the death of a patient, I think they tend to be more emotional and vocal about how much they do care about their patients and how the outcomes effect them, rather than having the "hardened exterior" you see portrayed in adult medicine and surgery.
     
  19. miko2005

    miko2005 Senior Member

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    I live about ~35-40 minutes from the hospital and its definitely doable (although not always convenient). However, we don't take call (except for autopsy) in the first 2 years so that definitely helps.
     
  20. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    In what ways?
     
  21. DarksideAllstar

    DarksideAllstar you can pay me in bud

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    Well, I've seen a few peds residents cry with families and a ped onc attending that I worked for prior to med school would also usually convey to me how his day-to-day job made him feel and how difficult it was for him to deal with seeing some of his patients pass. I think the people who go into peds just seem to have a more difficult time separating the person from the disease process like so many medicine attendings do. I think it relates to the inherent nature of "the innocence" seen in pediatrics patients and how most inflictions have nothing to do with their behaviors. Plus, peds attracts a certain type of personaility. How else can you explain people who take Q4 call who are usually pretty happy to come into work everyday and know that in the future they'll make the least of any of the medical specialties.
     
  22. mlw03

    mlw03 Senior Member
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    i strongly agree with this based on my experiences as a med student thus far. i also agree big time with the fact that pediatricians see their patients in a different light than medicine docs because so few peds diseases are a result of bad behavior - which is clearly not the case in adult medicine. before deciding 100% on path, the clinical fields i found most appealing were peds subspecialties and i know it's because it'd be much easier for me to care about a 6 year old with ALL than a 62 year old with 75 pack years with small cell lung cancer. i wonder if this natural human inclination to feel more compassion for people whose plights are not of their own doing plays into why many adult physicians seem so burned out. these are just generalizations of course, but it's been what i've seen a lot of in practice.
     
  23. Click Here!

    Click Here! PGY 2

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    I could've written this exactly. :thumbup:
     

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