Feb 28, 2012
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In drosophila, recessive mutants A and B each cause a curly-wing phenotype when homozygous. However, transheterozygous flies (i.e. flies that are A/B) have curly wings, even though neither mutation is homozygous. Which of the following conclusions is MOST consistent with these results?

A. Mutations A and B complement each other; therefore they affect different genes.
B. Mutations A and B fail to complement each other; therefore they affect different genes.
C. Mutations A and B complement each other; therefore they affect the same gene.
D. Mutations A and B fail to complement each other; therefore they affect the same gene.

Answer: D
Can someone give a simpler explanation than TBR please? thanks.
 

Morsetlis

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Feb 28, 2012
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"The question states that mutants A and B are each recessive, meaning that they normally express their curly wing phenotype only when they are homozygous (i.e. A/A or B/B). However transheterozygous flies were made by crossing the two mutant lines to each other, resulting in some progeny which were A/B. Each individual mutant is still heterozygous but for some reason A/B flies have the curly wing phenotype."
 

chiddler

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Apr 6, 2010
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"The question states that mutants A and B are each recessive, meaning that they normally express their curly wing phenotype only when they are homozygous (i.e. A/A or B/B). However transheterozygous flies were made by crossing the two mutant lines to each other, resulting in some progeny which were A/B. Each individual mutant is still heterozygous but for some reason A/B flies have the curly wing phenotype."
i'm sorry