FreudsDaddy

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Lets say you adopt 10 children(All at birth). Both of all of their parents are schizophrenic. Does anyone think they could do anything to prevent these children from becoming schizophrenic?

Under this situation considering there is a 75% chance they become ill do you just give them anti-psychotic treatment the very first sign of any type of symptom?

Under what situation could we have a 100% success rate in preventing illness?
 

whopper

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Does anyone think they could do anything to prevent these children from becoming schizophrenic?
Yes, but there isn't anything that's 100%

There are studies showing that fish oil may prevent psychotic mental illness.
http://www.plefa.com/article/S0952-3278(06)00125-6/abstract
http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/2/146


There is data showing that antipsychotic medication given in the prodromal stage of psychosis may delay or prevent (depending on the study) the onset to full blown schizophrenia. While we would obviously prefer complete prevention instead of delay, that delay does make a difference. Onset of schizophrenia at a later age correlated with a better prognosis. Unfortunately I can only find one article online right now to back the statement. I have read, however, a few studies in this area.

http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(09)00828-2/abstract

Use of marijuana may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia.
http://www.tijdschriftvoorpsychiatrie.nl/issues/259/articles/6627
http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/45/10/21.full

There's data suggesting that children born in a specific time of year and the geographical location are more likely to develop schizophrenia:
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/full/176/1/68

If the father if of advanced age, the risk of schizophrenia goes up. While I only found this article online, I've seen more detailed presentation as to the theory as to why this happens (point mutations in sperm, the older the father, the more the point mutations).
http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/08/time-to-pregnancy-linked-to-schizophrenia/13644.html

Owning a cat can increase a child's risk of schizophrenia
http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/001849.html

Regarding early atypica antipsychotic treatment to delay/prevent schizophrenia:
Now there isn't any good clinical options in attempting to determine if someone is entering the prodrome stage. One option that isn't clinically available due to cost involves frequent PET scanning for anyone with any known predisposition to schizophrenia. Things may change in the near future. Unfortunately, I do not have the article on me now but an issue of the Carlat Report from a few months ago (I believe it was about 2-4 months ago) mentioned an interview based test that could be done that had a reasonable level of sensivity and specificity. It needs more data but it could become an option a few years down the road.

If someone had any predisposition to schizophrenia and was under or at the age where onset could occur, I'd recommend a diet rich in omega-3-fatty acids and avoidance of marijuana. If the person was showing signs of prodrome, I'm not sure what I'd do because giving atypicals before the onset of schizophrenia isn't exactly standard of care.
 
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Manicsleep

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whopper

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T. gondii huh...that explains it then.
I just thought that people who owned cats were strange.
It turns out the T. gondii thing may be responsible for a heck of a lot of things including car accidents. Prenatal exposure may cause a delay in hand-eye coordination. That allegedly is actually advantageous for the organism because it allows it to fester in rodents. The slowing reaction also affects cats that in effect do not catch as many rodents. Cat gobbles rodent --> feces is infected --> rodents eat feces, rodents are infected ---> cats eat rodents.
 

kugel

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so many cats.....

so few recipes.
 
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FreudsDaddy

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Yes, but there isn't anything that's 100%

There are studies showing that fish oil may prevent psychotic mental illness.
http://www.plefa.com/article/S0952-3278(06)00125-6/abstract
http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/2/146


There is data showing that antipsychotic medication given in the prodromal stage of psychosis may delay or prevent (depending on the study) the onset to full blown schizophrenia. While we would obviously prefer complete prevention instead of delay, that delay does make a difference. Onset of schizophrenia at a later age correlated with a better prognosis. Unfortunately I can only find one article online right now to back the statement. I have read, however, a few studies in this area.

http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(09)00828-2/abstract

Use of marijuana may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia.
http://www.tijdschriftvoorpsychiatrie.nl/issues/259/articles/6627
http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/45/10/21.full

There's data suggesting that children born in a specific time of year and the geographical location are more likely to develop schizophrenia:
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/full/176/1/68

If the father if of advanced age, the risk of schizophrenia goes up. While I only found this article online, I've seen more detailed presentation as to the theory as to why this happens (point mutations in sperm, the older the father, the more the point mutations).
http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/08/time-to-pregnancy-linked-to-schizophrenia/13644.html

Owning a cat can increase a child's risk of schizophrenia
http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/001849.html

Regarding early atypica antipsychotic treatment to delay/prevent schizophrenia:
Now there isn't any good clinical options in attempting to determine if someone is entering the prodrome stage. One option that isn't clinically available due to cost involves frequent PET scanning for anyone with any known predisposition to schizophrenia. Things may change in the near future. Unfortunately, I do not have the article on me now but an issue of the Carlat Report from a few months ago (I believe it was about 2-4 months ago) mentioned an interview based test that could be done that had a reasonable level of sensivity and specificity. It needs more data but it could become an option a few years down the road.

If someone had any predisposition to schizophrenia and was under or at the age where onset could occur, I'd recommend a diet rich in omega-3-fatty acids and avoidance of marijuana. If the person was showing signs of prodrome, I'm not sure what I'd do because giving atypicals before the onset of schizophrenia isn't exactly standard of care.

Well since most of these mental illnesses happen at the start of puberty or right after, what if they were giving some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy during these critical stages. Improve their sense of esteem and stop any cognitive distortions that may expand and lead to psychosis.

I mean how many high self esteem people do you see cutting themselves or inside of mental hospitals. I'm sure theres gotta be some connection with self esteem and mental illness. I could be wrong though. I also don't get that case of that girl named dani who was apparently born schizophrenic which kind of makes my theory seem erroneous.
 

Ibid

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Whooper

Missed one off your list.
MALMO (SWEDEN): The well-heeled might have cause for alarm. A scientist in Sweden says wearing high heels can lead to mental disorders, and has drawn alarming parallels between stilettos and schizophrenia among women.

Jarl Flensmark says high heels cause their wearers to tense their calves in a way that normal walking never does. That could prevent neuro-receptors in the calf muscles from triggering release of dopamine, a compound necessary for mental well-being.

"During walking, synchronised stimuli from mechanoreceptors in the lower extremities increase activity in cerebellothalamo-cortico-cerebellar loops through their action on NMDA-receptors," Flensmark wrote in a recent paper in the journal Medical Hypotheses.

"Using heeled shoes leads to weaker stimulation of the loops. Reduced cortical activity changes dopaminergic function, which involves the basal gangliathalamo-cortical-nigro-basal ganglia loops," he said.

Longterm wearing of high heels could conceivably explain why Western societies have higher rates of schizophrenia among women then do other societies where high heels are rarely worn.

"Heeled footwear," he writes, "began to be used more than 1,000 years ago, and led to the occurrence of the first cases of schizophrenia ... Industrialisation of shoe production increased schizophrenia prevalence.
http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/002164.html

And I have an article somewhere that claims crotchless panties cause conversion disorders....
 

toothless rufus

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Whooper

Missed one off your list.
MALMO (SWEDEN): The well-heeled might have cause for alarm. A scientist in Sweden says wearing high heels can lead to mental disorders, and has drawn alarming parallels between stilettos and schizophrenia among women.

Jarl Flensmark says high heels cause their wearers to tense their calves in a way that normal walking never does. That could prevent neuro-receptors in the calf muscles from triggering release of dopamine, a compound necessary for mental well-being.

"During walking, synchronised stimuli from mechanoreceptors in the lower extremities increase activity in cerebellothalamo-cortico-cerebellar loops through their action on NMDA-receptors," Flensmark wrote in a recent paper in the journal Medical Hypotheses.

"Using heeled shoes leads to weaker stimulation of the loops. Reduced cortical activity changes dopaminergic function, which involves the basal gangliathalamo-cortical-nigro-basal ganglia loops," he said.

Longterm wearing of high heels could conceivably explain why Western societies have higher rates of schizophrenia among women then do other societies where high heels are rarely worn.

"Heeled footwear," he writes, "began to be used more than 1,000 years ago, and led to the occurrence of the first cases of schizophrenia ... Industrialisation of shoe production increased schizophrenia prevalence.
http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/002164.html

And I have an article somewhere that claims crotchless panties cause conversion disorders....
Damn! No more cross-dressing for me! :(
 

whopper

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Yeah, bummer. On Saturday nights, I turn on the disco-ball, wear high heels and an electric blue skimpy bikini and dance till I drop. I better stop doing that! :D
 

toothless rufus

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Yeah, bummer. On Saturday nights, I turn on the disco-ball, wear high heels and an electric blue skimpy bikini and dance till I drop. I better stop doing that! :D
Haha! Im picturing the Buffalo Bill dance scene from Silence of the Lambs!