ClinicalPsycPhD

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hi, I was wondering if anyone has had experience with credential banking. I'm getting ready to apply for licensure at the end of the year which requires so much paperwork so it seems like banking the information would be a good idea. Does anyone have advice about which program they used and if it was helpful for example if you move to another state later?
Thanks!
 

Therapist4Chnge

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There are a few, with varying costs. If you do a search on here there have been some prior discussions. I am going with ABPP, as I will be applying for boarding through them anyway. If you are still in your internship/post-doc/fellowship, you can apply for the "early entry option", which offers a reduced fee ($25 instead of $125). I'd look elsewhere if you are not pursuing boarding, but it is a nice perk if you are going for boarding anyway.
 

LMK

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T4C, did you upload all your practica in that process? I wasn't sure if that was completely necessary, and boy does the process seem tedious!!
There are a few, with varying costs. If you do a search on here there have been some prior discussions. I am going with ABPP, as I will be applying for boarding through them anyway. If you are still in your internship/post-doc/fellowship, you can apply for the "early entry option", which offers a reduced fee ($25 instead of $125). I'd look elsewhere if you are not pursuing boarding, but it is a nice perk if you are going for boarding anyway.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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I don't believe I submitted any practica stuff...just my transcript for my degree.

This thread bump is perfectly timed, as I need to get going on this, as I stalled out a few months back.
 

WisNeuro

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T4C, did you upload all your practica in that process? I wasn't sure if that was completely necessary, and boy does the process seem tedious!!
If you went to an accredited internship and fellowship, I believe you can skip a ton of the paperwork for ABPP-CN, no need to painstakingly document every little thing. Not sure how it works for others.
 

AcronymAllergy

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If you went to an accredited internship and fellowship, I believe you can skip a ton of the paperwork for ABPP-CN, no need to painstakingly document every little thing. Not sure how it works for others.
Yeah, there are convenient little check boxes if you attended an accredited grad school/internship/post-doc that essentially then just lets you submit your completion certification/verification and forgo any documentation of things like course syllabi, practicum information, didactics schedules, etc.

Like T4C, I'm going with the early-entry ABPP option. They completely reeled me in with the, "save $100!" offer. Grad school trained me well.

I looked at licensing applications for a few different states, and they all worked the same way--if you graduated from an accredited grad school and completed an accredited internship, you just submitted transcripts and had your internship TD verify your completion of their program. If not, you had to provide proof that you completed a variety of coursework (e.g., classes in ethics, diversity/multicultural issues, psychotherapy, etc.) with the possibility that the board would request syllabi to verify that the classes were appropriate adequate.
 

OneNeuroDoctor

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I have applied for National Registry Health Service Psychologists and so far everything is approved. Once I become licensed in October, I will then have HSP. HSP credential may be transferred to ABPP credentialing for some specialties as HSP credential eliminates the need to provide documents from graduate program, internship, and licensure. However, you have to provide postdoctoral information for some specialties, as in neuropsychology and forensics.
HSP banks all of your degrees and credentials.

My program was ASPPB/NR approved and my internship was APA accredited so I was able to skip over much of the application information. When you apply for licensure, if your program is ASPPB/NR or APA accredited and your internship is APPIC or APA accredited you normally check a box and you don't have to get information and references from practicums. My understanding is the HSP is required by many hospitals.
 
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LMK

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That's good to know. I plan to do the ABPP early entry, and started the credential banking a while back but stalled at the practica tabs. I'm going on postdoc this fall so I still have a year to get it all in. But good to know about the boxes re:APA program for this, as it eliminates a lot of hoops. I was grateful for that with licensing forms, past and upcoming!!
 

LMK

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I have applied for National Registry Health Service Psychologists and so far everything is approved. Once I become licensed in October, I will then have HSP. HSP credential may be transferred to ABPP credentialing for some specialties as HSP credential eliminates the need to provide documents from graduate program, internship, and licensure. However, you have to provide postdoctoral information for some specialties, as in neuropsychology and forensics.
HSP banks all of your degrees and credentials.

My program was ASPPB/NR approved and my internship was APA accredited so I was able to skip over much of the application information. When you apply for licensure, if your program is ASPPB/NR or APA accredited and your internship is APPIC or APA accredited you normally check a box and you don't have to get information and references from practicums. My understanding is the HSP is required by many hospitals.
I didn't look too far into it, but noticed several hospitals and med centers wanted the ABPP. I didn't see any mention of the HSP.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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I didn't look too far into it, but noticed several hospitals and med centers wanted the ABPP. I didn't see any mention of the HSP.
There is a push at most AMCs to require boarding of any FT psych faculty, as it has been a longstanding requirement of physicians. Every place I considered not only required it, but had a deadline for being boarded (typically 3yrs) for any new faculty. That sounds like a lot of time, but it goes quickly and the process takes ~1 yr if you keep to decent deadlines. I know for certain: Johns Hopkins, Mayo Clinic, University of Michigan, Ohio State, University of Pittsburgh, and NYU. It is a bit more of a crapshoot if places are going to require existing staff to pursuing boarding, and I'm not sure the requirement is pushed at the university level..so YMMV.
 

AcronymAllergy

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There is a push at most AMCs to require boarding of any FT psych faculty, as it has been a longstanding requirement of physicians. Every place I considered not only required it, but had a deadline for being boarded (typically 3yrs) for any new faculty. That sounds like a lot of time, but it goes quickly and the process takes ~1 yr if you keep to decent deadlines. I know for certain: Johns Hopkins, Mayo Clinic, University of Michigan, Ohio State, University of Pittsburgh, and NYU. It is a bit more of a crapshoot if places are going to require existing staff to pursuing boarding, and I'm not sure the requirement is pushed at the university level..so YMMV.
That was my experience in looking at a few other AMCs as well. VAs are also wanting folks to get boarded for certain specialties (primarily neuro right now), although it's not a formal requirement, and there are sites that are more or less lenient about it depending on how hard-up they are in filling their open positions.
 

erg923

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Can I ask what "HSP" is and what it means/indicates or signifies/allows one to do?
 

erg923

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"Health service psychologist?" What clinical psychologist who is practicing isnt delivering a health service? Seems like statement of the obvious...
 

psycscientist

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The National Register thing is basically just paying for an independent body to verify you meet very basic training criteria in order to award what is essentially a meaningless credential. It doesn't add anything above and beyond to someone who has APA-accredited training, except that it may improve licensure mobility. ABPP, on the other hand, is a credential that is actually dependent on demonstration that you are skilled and requires examination.
 

AcronymAllergy

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To add to psycscientist's post: HSP = Health Service Psychologist, which is the designation provided by the National Register.

Browsing through their website, it seems the main benefits are (as mentioned) possibly-increased license portability and access to free CEs (no idea of what type or quality). It almost looks like the process is very similar to completing the ABPP early entry, where they verify and bank things like your transcripts, completion of internship, and postdoc training. The advantage to that, of course, is that if the state licensing board accepts HSP, you don't need to track down former supervisors a number of years down the road.

Although yes, if you're ABPP'd, I don't see anything you'd substantively gain by going through HSP.
 
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erg923

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To add to psychscientist's post: HSP = Health Service Psychologist, which is the designation provided by the National Register.

Browsing through their website, it seems the main benefits are (as mentioned) possibly-increased license portability and access to free CEs (no idea of what type or quality). It almost looks like the process is very similar to completing the ABPP early entry, where they verify and bank things like your transcripts, completion of internship, and postdoc training. The advantage to that, of course, is that if the state licensing board accepts HSP, you don't need to track down former supervisors a number of years down the road.

Although yes, if you're ABPP'd, I don't see anything you'd substantively gain by going through HSP.
I see. Weird name/title since ALL practicing psychologists are essentially providing health service.
 

OneNeuroDoctor

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ABPP will accept the NR/HSP for generic review of standards and the NR/HSP will accept the ABPP specialization in clinical neuropsychology, forensic psychology and school psychology. I see that the ABPP specialization provides for salary advances in many Federal Government jobs. It seems that the HSP allows for portability of your license from one state to another state whereas the ABPP is set up for speciality competency standards in a number of areas. My main area is in Clinical Neuropsychology and a two-year postdoctoral residency is required. I went ahead and began the early career ABPP application and submitted it today so I my apply for ABCN after I finish my two year postdoctoral. ABPP is much more expensive than HSP for individual without interest in Board certification.

It does not necessarily appear that ABPP and HSP are different sets of standards but that they seem to be standards for State licensing Boards as in the HSP and that the ABPP is standards for specialization competencies.

A. Generic Requirements. Review of generic credentials is performed by the ABPP Central Office. Requirements for the generic review include:

  1. 1. A doctoral degree from a program in professional psychology which, at the time the degree was granted, was accredited by the APA or CPA, or was listed in the publicationDoctoral Psychology Programs Meeting Designation Criteria. Applicants credentialed in the most recent directory of the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology, theCanadian Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology, or the Certificate of Professional Qualification in Psychology from the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB CPQ) qualify as meeting the doctoral degree requirements.
  2. 2. Internship. Completion of an APA/CPA accredited internship program, or equivalent year of supervised experience.
  3. 3. Licensure or Certification. All ABPP candidates in the U.S., its territories or Canada must be licensed as a psychologist for independent practice at the doctoral level in a jurisdiction in the U.S., its territories or Canada.
  4. 4. Exceptions. ABPP grants limited exceptions for doctoral preparation prior to 1983, degrees granted outside the U.S or Canada, formal retraining, substantial equivalents to accreditation requirements, and licensure in jurisdiction of practice for some Federal employees.
In most cases, ABCN will accept ABPP’s decision regarding doctoral or internship program accreditation at the generic level. Questions regarding the adequacy of an applicant’s generic credentials should be directed to the ABPP Central Office.
 
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