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Oct 30, 2009
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I'm getting ready to apply this June, and I'm just starting to learn about the schools I plan to apply to. I'm hoping to stay in the northeast, preferably NY, but I'm applying broadly.

Please don't torch me for asking this, but I've noticed that in the greater NYC area, there is some snobbery about NYMC, and I'm wondering why that is? The physicians I worked with in NYC are adamant that Downstate, Stony Brook, the obvious ones (Columbia, Sinai, etc.) and Upstate are somehow significantly better than NYMC. Three practicing physicians who were in the Sophie Davis 7-year program said that Sophie Davis students intentionally BLEW NYMC interviews.

However, nobody has articulated why NYMC is supposedly inferior. From what I've read, it's third in the country for sheer applications, and the acceptance rate is really low. Westchester Med is well-regarded. I'm not in a position to choose (I'll be thrilled to get accepted into any US MD/DO program!) but as an older student, NYMC is quickly becoming my top choice. It's a great place to start a family, a quick commute to the city, and it looks like a fantastic school.

Can anyone shed some light on why the snobbery exists?? Is the match rate lower than it is for other schools? Is it simply the cost (private vs. SUNY)? A family friend went there and is now a professor and attending at Mayo...this sound incongruous with claims that this school is somehow "inferior" in the ranks.
 

Morsetlis

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NYMC is private and receives >10,000 apps a year. It is considered a "safety" school by many people. It was also recently taken over by a DO brand, but that doesn't actually change anything for med students. For basic sciences most people dorm on campus (4 ppl to a dorm usually). For clinicals you can either choose a campus site (a prison and Westchester are near the school) or do something in NYC (which is huge).

I think the snobbery exists because of private vs. state.
 

MDtobe31311

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I'm not from NY, but I did apply to NYMC mostly because my stats matched with theirs. I didn't know much else about the school.

They do have the easiest secondary ever! Just answering some questions with a few clicks and you're done. I know a lot of people applied to NYMC for that very reason. Secondaries are no fun my friend. I never even turned in the secondary for Rush because it just looked exhausting!
 

d1ony5u5

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I think this is really good question. From what I've learned from this year's application cycle, NYMC has this reputation for a couple of reasons (that I'm aware of. Maybe others can add more): 1st, the administration is supposed to be not that responsive to student input, and 2nd, it just has this image among applicants that it is a safety school.

I think the 2nd reason is the most important and unfair one. I don't know if NYMC inherited this reputation from actions it took in the past or something of the sort, but I can see this being an important factor in how it is perceived by others. It is kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy: You just need enough people to believe the assumption is true for it to become self-reinforcing. Lots of people apply to it as a safety, but most also get multiple acceptances. Since they perceive NYMC to be a safety, they choose one of their alternatives. This will keep happening as long as the reputation is passed on, without much relation with reality.

The truth is that as far as I am aware NYMC is just a good a school as the others in terms of board scores and all. It just doesn't have the prestige of big names, and for some reason it is assumed to be a safety school. I've also heard of people who trained there that moved on to more prestigious institutions and have successful careers.

In other words, I don't see a good, logical reason for why NYMC has this bad image, other than the fact that notoriety, once created is really hard to shake off...
 
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I think this is really good question. From what I've learned from this year's application cycle, NYMC has this reputation for a couple of reasons (that I'm aware of. Maybe others can add more): 1st, the administration is supposed to be not that responsive to student input, and 2nd, it just has this image among applicants that it is a safety school.

I think the 2nd reason is the most important and unfair one. I don't know if NYMC inherited this reputation from actions it took in the past or something of the sort, but I can see this being an important factor in how it is perceived by others. It is kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy: You just need enough people to believe the assumption is true for it to become self-reinforcing. Lots of people apply to it as a safety, but most also get multiple acceptances. Since they perceive NYMC to be a safety, they choose one of their alternatives. This will keep happening as long as the reputation is passed on, without much relation with reality.

The truth is that as far as I am aware NYMC is just a good a school as the others in terms of board scores and all. It just doesn't have the prestige of big names, and for some reason it is assumed to be a safety school. I've also heard of people who trained there that moved on to more prestigious institutions and have successful careers.

In other words, I don't see a good, logical reason for why NYMC has this bad image, other than the fact that notoriety, once created is really hard to shake off...
+1.

And to make things even crazier. They have the highest reported class pass rates for the boards out of all schools for the last four years or something. Above 99%. Thats is really unusual for their reputation right!? lol
 
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+1.

And to make things even crazier. They have the highest reported class pass rates for the boards out of all schools for the last four years or something. Above 99%. Thats is really unusual for their reputation right!? lol
It does seem odd, huh? Can anyone else chime in on this, since the forum is anonymous? I'm really curious. Why are physicians unwilling to explain the supposed deficit in NYMC?
 

mmmcdowe

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+1.

And to make things even crazier. They have the highest reported class pass rates for the boards out of all schools for the last four years or something. Above 99%. Thats is really unusual for their reputation right!? lol
I would be interested in seeing NYMC's source.
 

JJMrK

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A lot of people are turned off by the location. It's considered a safety school because the median numbers for accepted students are pretty low and because it's not associated with a big name university.
 
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A lot of people are turned off by the location. It's considered a safety school because the median accepted student numbers are pretty low and because it's not associated with a big name university.
Do you mean that the median accepted scores are pretty low in terms of GPA and MCAT? I can see why students might be turned off by upper Westchester, but it's actually an ideal location for me. Is the match rate low for specialized fields like anesthesia? Is it looked down upon enough that I'd be at a major disadvantage? I apologize for the multitude of questions.
 

JJMrK

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Do you mean that the median accepted scores are pretty low in terms of GPA and MCAT? I can see why students might be turned off by upper Westchester, but it's actually an ideal location for me. Is the match rate low for specialized fields like anesthesia? Is it looked down upon enough that I'd be at a major disadvantage? I apologize for the multitude of questions.
The general consensus on SDN is that your performance plays a much larger role in how you match than the school you go to.
 

JJMrK

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Also, moving this to School Specific Discussions.
 

Doctorverardoll

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I'm a second year and so far my experience @ NYMC has been pretty good. The admin can be hard to deal with at times, but some of our faculty are shining stars. I don't know how many hours I have spent in their offices and they were more than willing. One professor even came in on a Saturday to help a few of us for one of the miniboards.
I think a big part of the disdain is twofold:
1. location
2. for a long time the school painted itself as a primary care school, which is no longer the case.

Also, I'm putting the Match for the Class of '10.. just specialties
Family - 3
Child Psych - 1
Pediatrics - 20
Medicine - 40
Neurology - 4
Optho - 5
Psych - 10
OB - 8
Gen Surg - 16
NeuroSurg - 1
Ortho - 10
ENT - 3
Path - 1
EM - 18
Anes - 17
PMR - 4
RADS - 28
 
Feb 18, 2010
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AMAZING match list!!!

i think the fact that NYMC is not affiliated with a big undergrad makes it difficult for NYMC to get its name out there. (after i was accepted, people kept asking me: "the DO school?" (confusing NYMC with NYCOM)--which is a little annoying but i don't mind explaining NYMC to them.

also - since it doesn't have a big name like columbia, cornell, nyu, etc. if a nys resident were accepted to a SUNY they would probably choose the suny over nymc simply because of the cost.

this results in nymc losing a lot of the students that they accepted, and thus having to pull a lot of people off of the waitlist. (for last years class they said that of the 194, 103 were pulled from the waitlist, and almost 50% of the class is from CA)--so out of state (why CA...no idea!). If you look at the MSAR you will see that for the students that matriculated, the majority are OOS.

-i personally think the westchester area is a great location - especially for a family, but perhaps the fact that the campus really has a "college" feel in that most students live in 4-person apts rather than in 1 bedroom or 2 bedroom apts may deter some people.

-i think the administration/some students FEEL inferior that they go to NYMC...gain some confidence!! =)
*at my interview day, the admissions guy who talked to us kept saying that the waitlist isn't a bad thing because sooo many people get off of it...while this was good info to know, it also almost made NYMC seem like it was a safety school (something that i didn't even consider until after my interview day).
*also a lot of the students who i talked to just said, "yeh i chose NYMC because it's the only school i got into"...while this may be true, it's not really a selling point to prospective students.

-don't think this really matters (personally, i thought this was really cool), but nymc used to be one of the last standing homeopathic schools in the country before it changed its name to NYMC, and so older physicians may have some disdain towards it because of that.
 
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oh and in recent years a lot of people have been confused/mis-informed about the Touro merger...which may have detered them from matriculating at NYMC.

(before the merger there was a lot of protest by students...and being that touro doesn't really have a great "name" made a lot of people uneasy about the looming merger).
 

radioplay

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Hi All,

I have been a long-time lurker and have wanted to address this specific topic for some time now. I am a graduate of NYMC and hope that I can provide as accurate and unbiased advice about this school as possible. I don't have a chip on my shoulder of any sort nor do I feel a need to defend my alma mater, but I am just really tired of reading the same kind of thread year after year on this exact same topic. So here we go..

I think that there are many reasons for this view that NYMC is a safety school. I think a large part of this has to do with historical reasons. In the old days, NYMC used to be on Third Ave in Manhattan and then was later known as Flower Hospital. It started off as one of a handful of homeopathic medical schools in the country and only later became an allopathic school. NYMC back then, for whatever reason, was not known as a very good school. And in all honesty, from all accounts that I've heard, it was a pretty crappy school. If you ask many of the older attendings, they will have that same view to this day and will give that opinion of the school to their shadowing pre-med students or medical students. So as one can see, this can create a rather vicious and karma-like cycle. But in reality, I think that that opinion of NYMC is rather outdated, and while it may have applied a couple of generations ago, I do not believe that it applies in this day and age.

I think that NYMC is a solid school and does not deserve the criticism that it receives from this forum especially. But I'm going to keep it real. NYMC is an average school. It's not above average, but it's also not the bottom of the barrel as some SDNers might suggest. I think the problem is that in order to wade through all of the information that's out there in order to select schools, most pre-med students choose average matriculant grades and MCAT scores as a very important indicator of the quality of a school. I do think that this information is relevant and should be taken into consideration in choosing a school; it just shouldn't be the end all, be all. But even if one were to look at NYMC's average grades and MCAT scores, one would see that they have been consistently 3.6 and 31, respectively, for the past couple of years. Compare that to the national numbers, and you'll find that the GPA is a smidgeon lower than the national average, while the MCAT is slightly higher than the national average. This has been pretty consistent over the years in that NYMC will take students who may have slightly lower GPAs than the national average and have MCAT scores that are a tad bit higher than the national average. So even numbers-wise, NYMC is plain average; it's solid but not spectacular. In fact, if you compare NYMC's admissions stats with the other NY medical schools, you will find that they are consistently higher than Albany, Upstate, Downstate, and Buffalo (sometimes). Of course, the admissions numbers are different year to year, but stats-wise, that would place NYMC 9/12 in terms of admissions stats in NY; certainly not great but definitely not the worst either. Even those students that were selected by NYMC who had slightly lower GPAs tend to come from the more prestigious undergrads in the country, such as Ivy League schools and top private and public schools. I personally like the composition of the class in that roughly 1/3 is from NY, 1/3 from California, and the rest from every region of the country imaginable, including Utah and Florida. I found my classmates to be diverse, and this made my experience in med school that much richer. But again, I want to keep it real. There were not that many minorities in my class, only a handful, and I believe that the College is taking steps to diversify the school in that respect. It also does have a Catholic affiliation (at least until mid-2010), but in all honestly, this did not affect my education at all, except that the hospitals that I rotated at that were Catholic did not perform abortions.

Basic science wise.. I thought that I received a solid background of the basic sciences. NYMC professors are usually not national leaders in their field, so you might not learn about some obscure type of research, but they are still cutting-edge. The professors are like those of any other school; you have good ones and bad ones - that is a given in any school. Overall though, the professors there tend to be more down to earth and approachable as their labs are right across from the lecture hall. If you are a huge research buff, then NYMC might not be the best fit; it is not known for it's research unless you're talking about cardiovascular, infectious disease, and maybe a couple of other fields. I believe that NYMC's annual securing of NIH funds puts them consistently in the 70-80s out of the 126 or so medical schools in the country - again, not amazing but definitely not terrible; just pretty average. I can say from experience that if you do want to get involved with research, there are ample opportunities and you certainly won't be bored. My research mentor actually did his post-doc under a former Nobel prize winner; so these professors certainly aren't scrubs. The curriculum is pretty traditional and nothing really too innovative. They will teach you what you need to do well during the clinical years and for the boards. Our students consistently do well on the boards, and if you take into consideration that we accept pretty average applicants, that says a lot about the efficiency of the teaching. I do have to say that the basic science years at NYMC are rigorous; you will get hammered. In comparing other local schools in NY, I can honestly say that our curriculum is more rigorous than most other schools. For example, during second year for pathology, we read straight out of Robbins, the bible of pathology. You will literally read those 1000+ pages cover to cover and probably more than once. Many schools do not require you to read Robbins and just use it as a source of reference. But let me tell you that reading Robbins cover to cover helped me so much for the clinical years and also the boards, and I am still reaping the benefits from reading that bad boy as a resident.

The clinical years.. are what make NYMC so solid in my opinion. I didn't know what "diversity in clinical experience" meant until I came to NYMC. As a third year, I took care of complicated messed up Medicine patients at a Level 1 trauma and tertiary care center; I was doing EKGs on Family Medicine patients up in rural Kingston, NY right near where the original Woodstock was held; I was delivering babies at a community hospital in Connecticut; and I was talking to schizophrenic patients in the same hospital where the 9/11 victims initially were sent to. I will put my clinical experience up against any medical student's in the country. Westchester Medical Center also has the highest case selectivity index in the state of NY, meaning that it takes care of the most complicated and screwed up patients in the state; you will feel like a pro as an intern if you rotated there as a medical school. St. Vincent also has a rich history in serving the Lower West Side of NYC as it has treated the Titanic survivors as well as the 9/11 victims and also was a major AIDs center during the 90s when the AIDs epidemic was at its peak. But have to say that these hospitals are all broke (along with most other NYC hospitals). Westchester has been in financial hardship for some time now, and we've all heard about the recent news of the potential closing of St. Vincent.

And everything else.. I haven't even addressed the other issues, so I will speak about them briefly. As far as location is concerned, my personal opinion is that NYMC has a great location. Not that Valhalla, NY is a very happening place, but I think it's the perfect environment for studying. It's a nice quiet place so you won't have distractions when you're studying. And when you're done studying, you can just hop on a train and go down to NYC in 30-40 minutes (which isn't bad if you consider the average commute of a New Yorker). Valhalla is in Westchester County, which is one of the most affluent counties in America. If you want, you could stalk the homes of certain celebrities such as Martha Stewart and Bill Clinton. And that leads me to cost. The price-tag on an NYMC education is going to break the bank. You will be paying a premium, not so much for tuition but for living expenses. If you are not receiving any help from your parents, you will easily take out $200,000 in loans. If you are a NY state resident, I strongly suggest you go the public route because you will be buying your Benz a lot sooner than your private school friends. The difference in quality of education is minimal and not worth the premium that you pay in my mind. In terms of specialty choices, NYMC consistently has great matches across the board. However, we tend to match well in recent years in Radiology, Ophtho, Ortho, Neurosurg, Anesthesia, EM, as well as IM and Peds. I believe we haven't done as well in matching in Urology, Family Medicine, Derm, and Plastics. In recent years, we usually have 0-1 people matching in Derm and I don't remember seeing anyone go into Plastics in the last few years. But to be honest, I'm not sure if this is because no one applied or if people had applied but failed to match.

Wow, that was a crazy long post, but in summary, I think that I received a solid education at NYMC. I will put my clinical education up against anyone else's in the country. But let's be real: NYMC is an average school in a desirable region of the country. That is why I believe it receives 9000-10,000+ applications a year. I have no problem of some people viewing it as a safety school, but I believe that most of the reasons why it is such are outdated. I don't think it deserves the attention that it sometimes receives on SDN. NYMC is an average school; nothing more, nothing less.
 
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pky463

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Hi All,

I have been a long-time lurker and have wanted to address this specific topic for some time now. I am a graduate of NYMC and hope that I can provide as accurate and unbiased advice about this school as possible. I don't have a chip on my shoulder of any sort nor do I feel a need to defend my alma mater, but I am just really tired of reading the same kind of thread year after year on this exact same topic. So here we go..

I think that there are many reasons for this view that NYMC is a safety school. I think a large part of this has to do with historical reasons. In the old days, NYMC used to be on Third Ave in Manhattan and then was later known as Flower Hospital. It started off as one of a handful of homeopathic medical schools in the country and only later became an allopathic school. NYMC back then, for whatever reason, was not known as a very good school. And in all honesty, from all accounts that I've heard, it was a pretty crappy school. If you ask many of the older attendings, they will have that same view to this day and will give that opinion of the school to their shadowing pre-med students or medical students. So as one can see, this can create a rather vicious and karma-like cycle. But in reality, I think that that opinion of NYMC is rather outdated, and while it may have applied a couple of generations ago, I do not believe that it applies in this day and age.

I think that NYMC is a solid school and does not deserve the criticism that it receives from this forum especially. But I'm going to keep it real. NYMC is an average school. It's not above average, but it's also not the bottom of the barrel as some SDNers might suggest. I think the problem is that in order to wade through all of the information that's out there in order to select schools, most pre-med students choose average matriculant grades and MCAT scores as a very important indicator of the quality of a school. I do think that this information is relevant and should be taken into consideration in choosing a school; it just shouldn't be the end all, be all. But even if one were to look at NYMC's average grades and MCAT scores, one would see that they have been consistently 3.6 and 31, respectively, for the past couple of years. Compare that to the national numbers, and you'll find that the GPA is a smidgeon lower than the national average, while the MCAT is slightly higher than the national average. This has been pretty consistent over the years in that NYMC will take students who may have slightly lower GPAs than the national average and have MCAT scores that are a tad bit higher than the national average. So even numbers-wise, NYMC is plain average; it's solid but not spectacular. In fact, if you compare NYMC's admissions stats with the other NY medical schools, you will find that they are consistently higher than Albany, Upstate, Downstate, and Buffalo (sometimes). Of course, the admissions numbers are different year to year, but stats-wise, that would place NYMC 9/12 in terms of admissions stats in NY; certainly not great but definitely not the worst either. Even those students that were selected by NYMC who had slightly lower GPAs tend to come from the more prestigious undergrads in the country, such as Ivy League schools and top private and public schools. I personally like the composition of the class in that roughly 1/3 is from NY, 1/3 from California, and the rest from every region of the country imaginable, including Utah and Florida. I found my classmates to be diverse, and this made my experience in med school that much richer. But again, I want to keep it real. There were not that many minorities in my class, only a handful, and I believe that the College is taking steps to diversify the school in that respect. It also does have a Catholic affiliation (at least until mid-2010), but in all honestly, this did not affect my education at all, except that the hospitals that I rotated at that were Catholic did not perform abortions.

Basic science wise.. I thought that I received a solid background of the basic sciences. NYMC professors are usually not national leaders in their field, so you might not learn about some obscure type of research, but they are still cutting-edge. The professors are like those of any other school; you have good ones and bad ones - that is a given in any school. Overall though, the professors there tend to be more down to earth and approachable as their labs are right across from the lecture hall. If you are a huge research buff, then NYMC might not be the best fit; it is not known for it's research unless you're talking about cardiovascular, infectious disease, and maybe a couple of other fields. I believe that NYMC's annual securing of NIH funds puts them consistently in the 70-80s out of the 126 or so medical schools in the country - again, not amazing but definitely not terrible; just pretty average. I can say from experience that if you do want to get involved with research, there are ample opportunities and you certainly won't be bored. My research mentor actually did his post-doc under a former Nobel prize winner; so these professors certainly aren't scrubs. The curriculum is pretty traditional and nothing really too innovative. They will teach you what you need to do well during the clinical years and for the boards. Our students consistently do well on the boards, and if you take into consideration that we accept pretty average applicants, that says a lot about the efficiency of the teaching. I do have to say that the basic science years at NYMC are rigorous; you will get hammered. In comparing other local schools in NY, I can honestly say that our curriculum is more rigorous than most other schools. For example, during second year for pathology, we read straight out of Robbins, the bible of pathology. You will literally read those 1000+ pages cover to cover and probably more than once. Many schools do not require you to read Robbins and just use it as a source of reference. But let me tell you that reading Robbins cover to cover helped me so much for the clinical years and also the boards, and I am still reaping the benefits from reading that bad boy as a resident.

The clinical years.. are what make NYMC so solid in my opinion. I didn't know what "diversity in clinical experience" meant until I came to NYMC. As a third year, I took care of complicated messed up Medicine patients at a Level 1 trauma and tertiary care center; I was doing EKGs on Family Medicine patients up in rural Kingston, NY right near where the original Woodstock was held; I was delivering babies at a community hospital in Connecticut; and I was talking to schizophrenic patients in the same hospital where the 9/11 victims initially were sent to. I will put my clinical experience up against any medical student's in the country. Westchester Medical Center also has the highest case selectivity index in the state of NY, meaning that it takes care of the most complicated and screwed up patients in the state; you will feel like a pro as an intern if you rotated there as a medical school. St. Vincent also has a rich history in serving the Lower West Side of NYC as it has treated the Titanic survivors as well as the 9/11 victims and also was a major AIDs center during the 90s when the AIDs epidemic was at its peak. But have to say that these hospitals are all broke (along with most other NYC hospitals). Westchester has been in financial hardship for some time now, and we've all heard about the recent news of the potential closing of St. Vincent.

And everything else.. I haven't even addressed the other issues, so I will speak about them briefly. As far as location is concerned, my personal opinion is that NYMC has a great location. Not that Valhalla, NY is a very happening place, but I think it's the perfect environment for studying. It's a nice quiet place so you won't have distractions when you're studying. And when you're done studying, you can just hop on a train and go down to NYC in 30-40 minutes (which isn't bad if you consider the average commute of a New Yorker). Valhalla is in Westchester County, which is one of the most affluent counties in America. If you want, you could stalk the homes of certain celebrities such as Martha Stewart and Bill Clinton. And that leads me to cost. The price-tag on an NYMC education is going to break the bank. You will be paying a premium, not so much for tuition but for living expenses. If you are not receiving any help from your parents, you will easily take out $200,000 in loans. If you are a NY state resident, I strongly suggest you go the public route because you will be buying your Benz a lot sooner than your private school friends. The difference in quality of education is minimal and not worth the premium that you pay in my mind. In terms of specialty choices, NYMC consistently has great matches across the board. However, we tend to match well in recent years in Radiology, Ophtho, Ortho, Neurosurg, Anesthesia, EM, as well as IM and Peds. I believe we haven't done as well in matching in Urology, Family Medicine, Derm, and Plastics. In recent years, we usually have 0-1 people matching in Derm and I don't remember seeing anyone go into Plastics in the last few years. But to be honest, I'm not sure if this is because no one applied or if people had applied but failed to match.

Wow, that was a crazy long post, but in summary, I think that I received a solid education at NYMC. I will put my clinical education up against anyone else's in the country. But let's be real: NYMC is an average school in a desirable region of the country. That is why I believe it receives 9000-10,000+ applications a year. I have no problem of some people viewing it as a safety school, but I believe that most of the reasons why it is such are outdated. I don't think it deserves the attention that it sometimes receives on SDN. NYMC is an average school; nothing more, nothing less.
This post kind of made me really really nervous and anxious to hear back from NYMC in a few weeks :) I hope I get in!!
 
Jun 30, 2009
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I think this is really good question. From what I've learned from this year's application cycle, NYMC has this reputation for a couple of reasons (that I'm aware of. Maybe others can add more): 1st, the administration is supposed to be not that responsive to student input, and 2nd, it just has this image among applicants that it is a safety school.

I think the 2nd reason is the most important and unfair one. I don't know if NYMC inherited this reputation from actions it took in the past or something of the sort, but I can see this being an important factor in how it is perceived by others. It is kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy: You just need enough people to believe the assumption is true for it to become self-reinforcing. Lots of people apply to it as a safety, but most also get multiple acceptances. Since they perceive NYMC to be a safety, they choose one of their alternatives. This will keep happening as long as the reputation is passed on, without much relation with reality.

The truth is that as far as I am aware NYMC is just a good a school as the others in terms of board scores and all. It just doesn't have the prestige of big names, and for some reason it is assumed to be a safety school. I've also heard of people who trained there that moved on to more prestigious institutions and have successful careers.

In other words, I don't see a good, logical reason for why NYMC has this bad image, other than the fact that notoriety, once created is really hard to shake off...

When I applied to schools i applied to NYMC because it offered a number of great programs. However, i was really put off when i called the admissions office a number of times and received very very rude response on the other side. This made me nervous because someone once told me that the way a school treats you before you matriculate is probably the same way they will treat you after.
 
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Definitely not a reflection of the faculty, staff, and the upperclassman who really put a lot of effort and time into helping the students. Everyone else is really nice and don't let the admissions office deter you in anyway.:)
 

whoknows2012

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Im glad somebody posted the match list, because consistently year in and year out NYMC has some pretty respectable match lists along with higher than average board scores (most recently 223). Great post above BTW makes me real excited about clinical rotations starting in just a little over a yr (Jul 2011).
:thumbup:
 
Jan 13, 2010
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I'm getting ready to apply this June, and I'm just starting to learn about the schools I plan to apply to. I'm hoping to stay in the northeast, preferably NY, but I'm applying broadly.

Please don't torch me for asking this, but I've noticed that in the greater NYC area, there is some snobbery about NYMC, and I'm wondering why that is? The physicians I worked with in NYC are adamant that Downstate, Stony Brook, the obvious ones (Columbia, Sinai, etc.) and Upstate are somehow significantly better than NYMC. Three practicing physicians who were in the Sophie Davis 7-year program said that Sophie Davis students intentionally BLEW NYMC interviews.

However, nobody has articulated why NYMC is supposedly inferior. From what I've read, it's third in the country for sheer applications, and the acceptance rate is really low. Westchester Med is well-regarded. I'm not in a position to choose (I'll be thrilled to get accepted into any US MD/DO program!) but as an older student, NYMC is quickly becoming my top choice. It's a great place to start a family, a quick commute to the city, and it looks like a fantastic school.

Can anyone shed some light on why the snobbery exists?? Is the match rate lower than it is for other schools? Is it simply the cost (private vs. SUNY)? A family friend went there and is now a professor and attending at Mayo...this sound incongruous with claims that this school is somehow "inferior" in the ranks.
Because all of the other schools in NY are either big name (columbia, sinai, NYU ect.) or cheap (SUNY). So for people wanting to go to school in NY NYMC is the least desirable school and this attitude probably was picked up by many applicants.
 

MBHockey

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To be honest, I never "knew" this about NYMC until I came on this board.

When I interviewed there I thought it was great and only slightly less impressive than Rochester or Duke (my other two interviews.) I think it garnered a bad reputation on boards like these and something like that's really hard to reverse. Even though it's less selective than other schools, it's still hard to get into when you consider that 92.1% of applicants are rejected.

The fact is that no matter where you go as long as you have a good class rank and do well on your boards you will have your pick of residencies.
 

drizzt3117

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I'd be intrigued to hear what at NYMC is comparable to Duke.
I'd also be interested if you'd make this statement if it wasn't the only school you got into...

To be honest, I never "knew" this about NYMC until I came on this board.

When I interviewed there I thought it was great and only slightly less impressive than Rochester or Duke (my other two interviews.) I think it garnered a bad reputation on boards like these and something like that's really hard to reverse. Even though it's less selective than other schools, it's still hard to get into when you consider that 92.1% of applicants are rejected.

The fact is that no matter where you go as long as you have a good class rank and do well on your boards you will have your pick of residencies.
 

MBHockey

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I'd be intrigued to hear what at NYMC is comparable to Duke.
I'd also be interested if you'd make this statement if it wasn't the only school you got into...
It was just the general feel of the schools when I interviewed including my interviewer, the curriculum presented, students, and faculty. I was most impressed by the program and faculty at Duke, but as I said, only marginally over Rochester and NYMC. The three schools all felt very similar to me on my interview day but if I had to rank it them it'd be Duke > Rochester > NYMC. There didn't seem to be a vast disparity in the education I'd be receiving or the residency opportunities available to me upon graduation from these institutions. I know that everyone on here likes to make a big fuss about research rankings, but it didn't seem that a large gap in quality existed between the schools.

Now, of course, this was only one day so it's not the best sample but I think the match lists speak for themselves.

Where do you go to school?
 

drizzt3117

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I don't attend any of the schools listed but Duke was by far my top choice as a premed. The opportunities you have as a 3rd year are unparalleled.
 

MBHockey

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I don't attend any of the schools listed but Duke was by far my top choice as a premed. The opportunities you have as a 3rd year are unparalleled.
Yeah if you're into research that third year at Duke is definitely a big draw, except that you have to pay tuition for it just like any other year which I think is pretty shady. Were you really impressed with duke at the interview? I thought their faculty was really great, Dr. Armstrong in particular.

I'm more interested in what I'll be doing after medical school though.
 

drizzt3117

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Yeah if you're into research that third year at Duke is definitely a big draw, except that you have to pay tuition for it just like any other year which I think is pretty shady.

I'm more interested in what I'll be doing after medical school though.
You can apply for stipended years and you have to pay four years of tuition for med school at every other med school also. There are lots of specialties where a research year is very common and greatly strengthens your application, in which case being able to do one while finishing med school in 4 years would be key.
 

MBHockey

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You can apply for stipended years and you have to pay four years of tuition for med school at every other med school also. There are lots of specialties where a research year is very common and greatly strengthens your application, in which case being able to do one while finishing med school in 4 years would be key.
That's very true. But I think we're getting off topic here. Sorry OP!
 
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No problem! Just as an addendum...my mom has a hip problem that is probably dysplasia/arthritis related, but she is determined to find a surgeon. She found one as HSS who is also a NYMC grad. Now that I'm aware of the school, highly specialized physicians who graduated from NYMC seem to be everywhere. Even if the school is not highly regarded compared to Columbia/Sinai/etc., it seems that NYMC grads get residencies and attending positions at pretty fancy institutions :)
 

mdeast

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No problem! Just as an addendum...my mom has a hip problem that is probably dysplasia/arthritis related, but she is determined to find a surgeon. She found one as HSS who is also a NYMC grad. Now that I'm aware of the school, highly specialized physicians who graduated from NYMC seem to be everywhere. Even if the school is not highly regarded compared to Columbia/Sinai/etc., it seems that NYMC grads get residencies and attending positions at pretty fancy institutions :)
Just stumbled on this thread, even though I didn't apply. One of our pediatric hem/onc fellows here at CHOP/Penn graduated from NYMC. We're the #1 pediatric institute in the world, so I think she did well for herself. :)
 
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