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Current PT's or PT Students...How did you remember AIOI?

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kellerac

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AIOI as in Action, Innervation, Origin, and Insertion of every muscle. I'm starting PT school in May and have a beheamoth 8 credit-hour Gross Anatomy class (among others) to start it off.

Rote chart memorization cannot be the best way to learn these. I'm wondering, what are some of your methods to remember this vast amount of information. Anybody have any tips? Thanks!

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My PT that I did my internship with would make me do the motions that the muscles were involved with and think about what bone(s) we're moving and where I thought they were originating. It helps more for the action and insertion but it should help a little but!

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AIOI as in Action, Innervation, Origin, and Insertion of every muscle. I'm starting PT school in May and have a beheamoth 8 credit-hour Gross Anatomy class (among others) to start it off.

Rote chart memorization cannot be the best way to learn these. I'm wondering, what are some of your methods to remember this vast amount of information. Anybody have any tips? Thanks!

Rewrite the OINA for a muscle 3x. Look at an anatomy diagram of dissection when studying. Touch the muscles on your body and force yourself to say the OINA. Move on to a muscle in the same anatomical compartment. Repeat. After doing one compartment, randomize it to recall using the diagram and your body to recite. Then, write it out.

Conform it to how you will be tested: paper, cadaver identification, classmate, oral recitation
 
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Use coloring books while saying the OINA for what it is that you are coloring in. Mnemonics for nerve innervations
 
Anki image occlusion if you are more visual with learning style. Wish I knew about it when I took gross
 
flash cards over and over. quiz your study buddies and have them quiz you.
 
I am still in undergrad but taking an anatomy course taught by a professor that teaches at UT Health here in SA.

I do not find it profoundly difficult, but my methods are my own... What I do is look at the muscle first (I use complete anatomy on my PC, or essential anatomy if I am on my phone), then carefully read the O,I,A, N while visualizing piece by piece. After doing that a few times I just repeat the hell out of the flash card (I make quizlet sets) until I got it.
Each time I move on to a new muscle I repeat the previous muscles. If I hit a snag I reset and make the mistake my new "last" muscle and go from there.
Typically I hit them while I walk on the treadmill at the gym so I dont get too bored with it. After I have slept or taken a break and return to studying I ALWAYS start from the top.
Example (Right now we are working on various leg muscles)
Iliacus
Iliacus
Iliacus
Iliacus - Rectus femoris
Iliacus - rectus femoris
iliacus - rectus femoris
iliacus - rectus femoris - sartorius
iliacus rectus femoris sartorius.... etc... you get it.
 
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Repetition, repetition, repetition. Innervation can be made easier by learning by groupings (eg, what muscles are innervated by radial n., medial n., etc.). Once you get the origin and insertion down, action becomes common sense since muscles only pull their origins and insertions closer to each other (in general). Like jadedphysiotherapist said a little bit up, once you have a group of muscles down, mix them up or mix them in with the other muscles you know and build your base of knowledge. Once you've successfully "learned" the entire body 2 or 3 times, it will be much easier, almost automatic. On top of that, once you get in the clinic or start applying your knowledge to specific cases, you will start to see patterns and your brain will just have more and more cues to work on. Unfortunately, it's a journey to get it all down and it won't happen overnight. You just have to keep at it. Repetition, repetition, repetition.
 
I used the Chegg Flashcard app on my ipad and typed up all of the AOI's for each ms as we learned them throughout the semester.
I would just follow how your professor categorizes ms groups (like anterior compartment of the forearm) and organize your flashcards that way.
Its a great way to give yourself a refresher without having all the information in front of you at once (like a textbook)

But yes, like some of the commenters mentioned above, this takes EFFORT and REPETITION. There's really no way around it.
 
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