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dds degrees

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by anxietypeaker, Nov 20, 2005.

  1. anxietypeaker

    anxietypeaker Senior Member
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    was wondering, what type of people should pursue the DDS/PhD over the DDS/MD.

    Both I'm assuming will work in academia. Anything else?
     
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  3. duh?

    duh? Senior Member
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    People who can take the initiative to do research and find out what both programs are about. People who can objectively evaluate their abilities and compare what they want to do with what those programs prepare them for instead of taking up space on SDN! :mad:

    Just kidding. no offence meant. :D
     
  4. dexadental

    dexadental 1K Member
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    I would assume the DDS/Phd program would prepare someone with clinical experience and a more research oriented based area of dentistry over just the DDS degree alone. My former orthodontist had a DDS and Phd and his own private practice. He also used to teach...so I believe you can really do both...the degrees qualify you to practice in both areas...academics or private practice. As far as the DDS/MD degrees, these people can practice in oral medicine, oral surgery, and other specialized areas of dentistry/medicine...they don't necessarily have to teach.
     
  5. Sprgrover

    Sprgrover Pulped out Moderator
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    A PhD means you really like research and you want to pursue it further and it would qualify you to teach a basic science course in dental school (besides those at the collegiate level). Most people that have a PhD have a research component to their career (e.g. a periodontist here at Penn regularly sees patients, is an active professor in the microbiology department, and has a lab). An MD means that you are nuts about school and went on to medical school after dental school (that's right, another 3-4 years plus how ever many it takes to complete whatever residency). Just because you have an MD doesn't mean you are qualified to perform oral surgery or practice oral medicine (and conversely not every OMFS program/residency, and certainly not every Oral Medicine residency, hands out an MD in addition to the certificate of completion for that residency, so you don't necessarily have to have the initials MD behind your name to practice either of them) as you have to successfully complete residencies for both of them in order to practice.
     

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