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dds/phd

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by 992, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. 992

    992

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    hello i have a question

    i'm not certain on this, but i'm pretty sure MD/PhD programs that are funded by NIH through T32 or a similar mechanism are residence independent (they dont take residence into account as long as you pass the MD portion of the process). is that true for dual degree DDS/PhD programs funded by NIH as well?

    i'm a pre-dent, but it doesnt seem like there's much interest in going into research with a DDS. the problem with this is that most (or maybe all) of the NIH funded schools are big state schools which sadly accept few out-of-staters. i think for med school it's a bit different because NIH funds all types of public and private schools, whereas only a small fraction of dental schools are funded (and for 1 or 2 seats at that). anybody know anything about this? i dont know who to ask and the other forum with md/phd people will probably know nothing about dentistry.

    i'll probably end up calling the schools to be safe but any info u guys might have would be nice. i searched the forums only to find like 5-7 year old posts...haha. seriously nobody wants to do dds/phd??
     
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  3. a2ndragoon89

    7+ Year Member

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    i'm applying for the dds/phd program at ucsf. if I get in, i'll most likely do it. the only downside is that only 2 are accepted there. I know UCLA has up to 5 seats, but they are not going to accept 5 every year. There's a list of schools that have the opportunity to do the dual degree program, but it really depends where you want to go. You can go a quick google search and find out which schools. One of the benefits of doing this program is that d-school is paid for, and you get a stipend. So no debt, and you can go out and practice without worrying about compounded interest that is likely going to hit you.
     
  4. 992

    992

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    while i appreciate your response, i feel like you did not even read the post..only the title. i'm not on the fence, i have a specific question about the T32 funding mechanism and how it affects residency.

    i'll summarize for you my question: because the DSTP programs are funded by NIH, is it true that schools do not take into consideration state residence when filling those spots?
     
  5. UFRalo

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    I'm not sure about how other schools work...but at UF we can't even apply for dmd/phd until D3...so basically it boils down to does the school care about accepting OOSers into each class. I know for UF they mentioned that they may reserve spots for dmd/phd students in the future, but in order to get one of those spots, you will have to be accepted into the entering class first and then apply to be a designated dmd/phd'er.

    To be honest though, it is probably a case by case basis...some schools will have you apply directly for a combined spot (e.g. MUSC) while others will be like I mentioned above. However, you should also be aware that getting a t32 doesn't necessarily cover your cost of attendance. For UF, the plan would be pay for 3 years of school, start t32 (while still paying 1/8 dental school tuition per semester) and graduate...so you wouldn't necessarily come out of school debt free.

    Interesting topic though...:)
     
  6. 992

    992

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    thanks for the response -- it seems like a terrible deal at UF. no lab rotations until 3rd year would mean that u probably wont finish in 7..more like 8 or 9. at that point it might just make more financial sense to pay in full for dental school and then pursue a PhD in conjunction with NIH's LRP.
     
  7. a2ndragoon89

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    oh I guess so. the only dds/phd programs I know specifically about are the ones on the west coast. sorry! for sure though, those programs are 8-9yrs long. At UCSF you do the first 2 years with your class, then 2 years rotating in labs and you choose a lab after that, then you go back with the class 2 yrs below you and finish up the last two years, then finish the PhD after that. For the record, i've no clue what a t32 mechanism is. My prof at ucsf just said that d-school was paid for if you do the dds/phd at ucsf.
     

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