Developement - - Animal Experience, Pre-Vet (Post Bacc), Vet School

Iain

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I know at least in the Pre-Allopathic forum, people despise others asking about their plans - however although I have a good idea of what is needed, assurance, and input at this stage would be greatly appreciated.

Animal Experience
What sort of animal/Volunteer experience are they looking for? It seems most schools say 300 hours of animal experience, what classes an animal experience? I have gained a lot of experience with animals but I have not really made a conscious effort to, I have just done it through living and growing up.

I grew up with horses - seen the world framed by their ears, and have been involved in every aspect from polo, to racing, to eventing, to fox hunting, to driving. I am very confident rider; I work young and problem horses with great success.

Growing up my family raised 8 charity dogs (our last one failed, and is currently at my feet). Many were taken from shelters, and had an abusive past, and other quirks. My mother was the most active with training these dogs, however we were all involved to a certain point (even though I refused to pick up poo)!

I lived for many years in the English countryside, and although I am not from a farming background I am familiar with it and have a small amount of experience with livestock. I would say I am competent around cows, sheep and pigs. I also understand their role in life.

When I was in Junior High - I used to semi-regularly take off Friday Mornings to go to the local veterinarian to watch operations. I was only 12 at the time, but probably spent a good 40 hours down there. Apart from watching operations, I got to see a few other things like the morning rounds of the patients that had to stay overnight, count pills for prescriptions, and to see a few cats and dogs be put to sleep.

More recently I dated a Vet - she had a very broad range of experience from small animals, to farm animals, and equine medicine. Although I did not tag around while she was working, I certainly gained insight to what exactly goes on (daily emergency calls from women in hysterics, about a cut leg - that when you arrive you could fit one stitch in - if you got out your scalpel).

I also currently volunteer at the local hospitals ER, and I think it will be far more applicable to veterinary medicine then I first thought. Although a sick cow does not need a bed made, just talking to patients, and families I have gained insight to the emotions patients, and love ones are going through in times of illness.

When I enroll in my pre-vet course, I am going to seek a vet to shadow and assist. Mainly to learn, keep the excitement up, and get more experience.

Is this enough? Do I need to do something where I made a conscious effort, rather then just being around it?

Pre-Vet (Post Bacc)

I think I currently have this under control - I am most likely going to Southern Oregon State as a non-degree student. I have spoke to the head of the school of science about what classes I might have a tough time enrolling in - initially there should be none. My schedule is as follows:

Year 1
Biology/Zoology
General Chemistry

Summer School
English

Year 2
Physics (1 semester)
Math (1 semester)
Organic Chemistry

Summer School
Genetics (1 semester)
Biochemistry (1 semester)

Admittedly I am slightly nervous, not so much about the coursework. I am only ever taking a maximum of 8 units, just kind of the move/change. My other concern is finding horses, I have never had problems before and with working problem horses it should be easy - we will have to wait and see though!

Going to Oregon gives me the advantage of becoming an Oregon resident, which could be helpful in the future.

Vet School
I know in the med school world Caribbean schools are looked down upon - is this the same for Vet schools? Reason I am interested is I am looking to move back to England after I complete my DVM, and these schools cater the European market, which will likely make that transition easier. I am looking into some of the schools in the UK, however they are ultra competitive as they are in NZ, and AU. It is a long way off, but any suggestions!

I know it is long, and probably rambles in areas - thank you for reading, and any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

bern

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I know this isn't an answer to the particular questions you were asking, but I just wanted to mention that you might want to enroll as a second degree student instead of a non-degree student. I'm in school as a post-bac now finishing up pre-vet requirements and I found that I wouldn't be eligible for financial aid unless I was a matriculated student. This may vary from school to school, but you might want to look into it if you'll be needing financial aid. It's really just a paperwork thing - it's not as if they can force you to stay in school and finish your declared major requirements.
 
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Iain

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Any information, question or point is appreciated in this thread. I have actually managed to save enough for my post bacc course. It is only when I go to vet school I will require financial aid (quite a substantial sum, I will add).
 

natelam

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Iain said:
Any information, question or point is appreciated in this thread. I have actually managed to save enough for my post bacc course. It is only when I go to vet school I will require financial aid (quite a substantial sum, I will add).
Vet Experience:
I highyl recommend getting working experience as a DVM assistant and tech. Working with humans may help you with people skills, but working clinically with animals is a whole different ball game. Husbandry, restraint, knowing how different species should be treated differently, knowing animal behavior in a clinical setting, and being familiar with animal diseases will be to your utmost advantage. Vet schools want to know that you know what it means to be a vet, good and bad. To have had experience raising animals, and caring for them is only half the battle, you need to understand how private practice works, how diagnoses are made (the client perspective and control especially makes this different than human medicine), and experience failure and euthanasia on a daily basis. You will find that these experiences will help you grow and really show you if being a vet is right for you.
 
K

Koukla18

Hello,
I just graduated college with a psych degree, but am looking at post bacc schools hopefully for the spring, summer latest. I haven't been able to find many people who are looking into/currently enrolled in one of these programs, so finding feedback has been extremely tough. If you have any information, experiences, comments, etc. about the schools, where to apply, which are better than others, I would be EXTREMELY appreciative!

Thanks so much!
 

twelvetigers

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This thread is oldd-d-d-d... I think bern might still be around, but the other members that posted in this thread are long gone.

I think a lost of people here advise going for a second degree rather than post-bacc because it's easier to get the classes you need (since post-bacc students are last to enroll, even after freshman). No one really expects you to finish the second degree, but it makes it easier to enroll, you can possibly get health insurance, you'll have an advisor in a relevant area... several reasons.

Hope that helps... I don't know anything about post-bacc programs if you're sure that's what you want.
 

cwazy cat lady

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I know this isn't an answer to the particular questions you were asking, but I just wanted to mention that you might want to enroll as a second degree student instead of a non-degree student. I'm in school as a post-bac now finishing up pre-vet requirements and I found that I wouldn't be eligible for financial aid unless I was a matriculated student. This may vary from school to school, but you might want to look into it if you'll be needing financial aid. It's really just a paperwork thing - it's not as if they can force you to stay in school and finish your declared major requirements.
Good advice. In fact, even as a matriculated post-bac student, I found that I was not eligible for much (any?) financial aid until I declared a major and became degree-seeking, rather than just a post-bac 5th year. I was frantic when it seemed like I wouldn't get that aid and my hopes of getting all my pre-reqs were being dashed. It was easy to get on the path to a second bachelor's and that solved it for me... Gave me another diploma, too, which wasn't too shoddy of a deal:cool:.

So, it does seem to matter to federal student loan agencies...
 

nyanko

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So, it does seem to matter to federal student loan agencies...
Yeah, for all the reasons twelvetigers listed plus this one, it is usually easier to just declare yourself as second degree seeking whether you plan to finish or not.

I finished, but I am weird. :smuggrin:
 

david594

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.... it is usually easier to just declare yourself as second degree seeking whether you plan to finish or not.

I finished, but I am weird. :smuggrin:
I'd be very cautious about mentioning your true intentions of actually completing the degree until you know how the person you are talking to feels about it.

Before I became a second bachelors student I talked to the curriculum director for the animal science department and he told me it was common for people to do a second bachelors as just a means to finish my pre-reqs and drop out once I had them or got into vet school(and was totally cool with it). Some 6 months later when I met with my advisor to pick my 2nd semesters classes she tore into me for "abusing the system" and that they accepted me assuming I actually wanted to finish the degree. All because I wanted to take a heavy science course load instead of all the animal science classes.