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rxblitzrx

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I'm curious to see if anyone has ever successfully switched to another program (same state). If so, how did you do it?

My curiosity stems from a personal belief that the job market will lend favoritism to a more prestigious program. I think it doesn't matter in retail, but hospital or clinical residencies probably would. Am I far from the tree on this one?

I'm also a little sad that I was only able to apply to one school. I took the PCAT in January, which was not acceptable by many schools due to admissions deadlines. My composite was well over the 90th percentile, which is why I'm constantly wondering if I made a mistake by not waiting a year.

In the end, I'm sure I can make the best of it, but I just need to know if it's even POSSIBLE to switch. I understand that all programs are different and starting over would not be a problem.

Thanks in advance.
 

genesis09

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In theory, it's possible to transfer, but in reality, you rarely see it. Of the people who do transfer, they might be required to be behind a year because of the differences in the curriculum.
 

KARM12

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I've met one transfer student...from Kentucky to MWU. She was behind one year of class due to the difference in the order we take classes. (But hey, she got out of Med Chem the entire 2nd yr). It is possible, but not common. Some schools will allow transfers and some will not. You would have to look into it for a specific program. I wouldn't be overly concerned about the prestige of a school...in the long run it isn't going to make a huge difference. Regardless, you will still have to work hard to get the decent grades to get into those residency programs. They aren't just going to hand you a position just because you went to a certain school.
 
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ZpackSux

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I'm curious to see if anyone has ever successfully switched to another program (same state). If so, how did you do it?

My curiosity stems from a personal belief that the job market will lend favoritism to a more prestigious program. I think it doesn't matter in retail, but hospital or clinical residencies probably would. Am I far from the tree on this one?

I'm also a little sad that I was only able to apply to one school. I took the PCAT in January, which was not acceptable by many schools due to admissions deadlines. My composite was well over the 90th percentile, which is why I'm constantly wondering if I made a mistake by not waiting a year.

In the end, I'm sure I can make the best of it, but I just need to know if it's even POSSIBLE to switch. I understand that all programs are different and starting over would not be a problem.

Thanks in advance.

If that's your concern then go get a residency at UCSF and do a fellowship. Can't beat prestige there..
 

rxblitzrx

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ok... Well, life has never been easy and, at least for me, the next 3.5 years will continue to be a challenge. I have a passion for this profession that grows with each chapter I read. I hesitate to say each lecture I attend because I honestly feel that the profs aren't that great. Politics is a very ugly thing at my school and half the faculty matriculated from within those same walls. It's like a perpetual cycle.

My only saving grace is that subject matter is the common link to every program, 1+1 will always equal 2, and Google will never let me down.

Thanks again peeps for the info. Good luck to you all!
 

rxblitzrx

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If that's your concern then go get a residency at UCSF and do a fellowship. Can't beat prestige there..

yeah... I'd love to but I doubt I'd even have a fair shot in the applicant pool, given the program I'm in.
 

taken2

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ok... Well, life has never been easy and, at least for me, the next 3.5 years will continue to be a challenge. I have a passion for this profession that grows with each chapter I read. I hesitate to say each lecture I attend because I honestly feel that the profs aren't that great. Politics is a very ugly thing at my school and half the faculty matriculated from within those same walls. It's like a perpetual cycle.

My only saving grace is that subject matter is the common link to every program, 1+1 will always equal 2, and Google will never let me down.

Thanks again peeps for the info. Good luck to you all!



I agree with you on the profs part, but you have to learn to make best out of the situation. Apart from really immature instructors like some of the ones we had last semester, you will be suprise to find out that most schools have the same problem where students feel that they are teaching themselves most of time (I have friends in other pharmacy schools in Tx ). I really don't think it is that bad.
Or you probably didn't want to come that school in the first place.
So don't think this problem is particular to this school.
And I still do not understand this politics thing you are talking about, I must be missing something
 

rxblitzrx

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I agree with you on the profs part, but you have to learn to make best out of the situation. Apart from really immature instructors like some of the ones we had last semester, you will be suprise to find out that most schools have the same problem where students feel that they are teaching themselves most of time (I have friends in other pharmacy schools in Tx ). I really don't think it is that bad.
Or you probably didn't want to come that school in the first place.
So don't think this problem is particular to this school.
And I still do not understand this politics thing you are talking about, I must be missing something

Sorry, my reference to political influence above sounded like it was pointed at the professors. I'm talking more about the students who were allowed into the program. Where else do you see such a large percentage of the class fail out? In my opinion, that is a poor reflection on ANY school. And for those who actually deserve to be there, it instantly labels them as failures (pick your word here).

Even before I got into this program, I knew the reputation. Their own faculty has written public statements on how it's the laughing stock of the Texas Medical Center. How "no creditable experiment or research could be done in those labs"... something along those lines. And every time I have to look someone in the eye and tell them where I go, they immediately say "oh....................." either with a smirk, a nervous smile, or a look in their eye that says "Ha. You got in, but you didn't really get in."

Now, if their reaction is the latter, that's their fault for being prideful. But it pains me to carry this label, especially when the receiving party is a pharm student at UH, with credentials worse than mine. What can I do? I could attempt to redeem myself by quoting GPAs and PCAT scores but that's just ridiculous. It's a no win situation.

Therefore, the main point of my thread here is that my school sucks. It lives up to its reputation because it really is that bad.

For those of you who go to my school, I apologize if this is offensive. If you're still there then obviously you're doing something right because the classes aren't exactly easy.
 

sdn1977

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I'm not sure your job market will be that limited. Unless you are able to go beyond what the bare minimum is, you'll stay in entry level positons. Your residency choices might be unless you choose to distinguish yourself.

But...your education does not end with the completion of pharmacy school.

They give you the foundation upon which you build your professional career.

If you know already that you are in a school which has a poor reputation - then get out there & get involved - in your local county, state & national organizations. Education comes in many forms, places & ways.

Leadership & knowledge are qualities which can be learned, but require effort on your part.

Do you want that badly enough?????
 

taken2

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Sorry, my reference to political influence above sounded like it was pointed at the professors. I'm talking more about the students who were allowed into the program. Where else do you see such a large percentage of the class fail out? In my opinion, that is a poor reflection on ANY school. And for those who actually deserve to be there, it instantly labels them as failures (pick your word here).

Even before I got into this program, I knew the reputation. Their own faculty has written public statements on how it's the laughing stock of the Texas Medical Center. How "no creditable experiment or research could be done in those labs"... something along those lines. And every time I have to look someone in the eye and tell them where I go, they immediately say "oh....................." either with a smirk, a nervous smile, or a look in their eye that says "Ha. You got in, but you didn't really get in."

Now, if their reaction is the latter, that's their fault for being prideful. But it pains me to carry this label, especially when the receiving party is a pharm student at UH, with credentials worse than mine. What can I do? I could attempt to redeem myself by quoting GPAs and PCAT scores but that's just ridiculous. It's a no win situation.

Therefore, the main point of my thread here is that my school sucks. It lives up to its reputation because it really is that bad.

For those of you who go to my school, I apologize if this is offensive. If you're still there then obviously you're doing something right because the classes aren't exactly easy.


That's exactly what I was trying to say, the classes are not easy and you will still learn the materials . I honestly think they ridicule that school because it is a black school. I have friends in P2 who were accepted at UH but they turned down the admission. I am not saying that the school is one of the best but I also don't think UH is any better . Their problem with lab I believe is funding. they do not have the same type of funding UH has.
I agree that percentage of failure just after first semester was so high. I was discussing the same thing with my friend just the other day after I saw a similar thread here on SDN. But at the same time , I feel the ones that are not qualified to be there are the ones that did not make back.
I am still there and I passed all my classes last semester. It is only you and I and the rest of the students in that school that can stand up against the people that talk bad about the school. Defend your school instead of letting them make you feel bad. I believe that those student at UH are not better than we are. I had the opporunity to go another school as I was also accepted into another program but I choose to stay in Houston and go to that school instead. I do not regret my decision
 

pharmdiva

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This thread brings up a very interesting point. I graduated undergrad from a school with a good reputation, and I feel like I have benefited a lot from that. When I decided to change my career and apply to pharmacy school many people accused me of being a snob b/c i didn't want to go anywhere but UH. But, the comments made in this thread just reaffirm my decision. I actually chose to wait out an entire year just so that I would have the opportunity to apply early decision to UofH later this year. As an African American female student I am very aware of how important it is to give myself every possible advantage in the workforce. This often means striving for high standards in myself and in the institution of higher learning that I choose. At the end of the day, it's about personal choice. My best advice to you is if you honestly feel that you are getting a good education - stay where you are. If not - don't be afraid to transfer and eat that first year if you have to. Pharmacy school is too expensive, and your career is too important to settle for second best in anything. I'm familiar with the school you are talking about, and I'm also very familiar with the reputation. No one truly knows what the economic climate will be in 3 to 4 years. Wouldn't it be a shame to start out at a disadvantage b/c you graduated from a school that didn't adequately prepare you? And what about boards? Do some soul searching, and ask yourself how YOU feel about your school (not what others think). I wish I had your stats - and you better believe - even without your stats I'm determined to get the best education money can buy. Be blessed.
 
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If that's your concern then go get a residency at UCSF and do a fellowship. Can't beat prestige there..

Actually, they won't give you the time of day if you didn't go to a school in Cali. At least that was the experience quite a few of my friends & I (students in FL) had at mid-year...
 

rxblitzrx

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This thread brings up a very interesting point. I graduated undergrad from a school with a good reputation, and I feel like I have benefited a lot from that. When I decided to change my career and apply to pharmacy school many people accused me of being a snob b/c i didn't want to go anywhere but UH. But, the comments made in this thread just reaffirm my decision. I actually chose to wait out an entire year just so that I would have the opportunity to apply early decision to UofH later this year. As an African American female student I am very aware of how important it is to give myself every possible advantage in the workforce. This often means striving for high standards in myself and in the institution of higher learning that I choose. At the end of the day, it's about personal choice. My best advice to you is if you honestly feel that you are getting a good education - stay where you are. If not - don't be afraid to transfer and eat that first year if you have to. Pharmacy school is too expensive, and your career is too important to settle for second best in anything. I'm familiar with the school you are talking about, and I'm also very familiar with the reputation. No one truly knows what the economic climate will be in 3 to 4 years. Wouldn't it be a shame to start out at a disadvantage b/c you graduated from a school that didn't adequately prepare you? And what about boards? Do some soul searching, and ask yourself how YOU feel about your school (not what others think). I wish I had your stats - and you better believe - even without your stats I'm determined to get the best education money can buy. Be blessed.

Thanks for the compliment. I worked hard for my scores but they really hold little significance beyond the 30 second impression for admissions.

If I'm reading your post correctly, you haven't applied yet? If so, I wish you the best of luck. From what I've read, you seem like a better fit for UH, and you definitely wouldn't be happy at my school. I was a little desperate when I first decided to try pharmacy. Being a little older, I felt rushed to get in and get out. All of my friends told me I wouldn't be happy here... I should have listened. Education wise, it would probably be the same. I think at any institution you'll have to do a little independent research to really get a grasp on the material. However, finding colleagues that can sharpen you, on any other level than intellectually, is a far cry. I honestly feel that my vocabulary and communication skills have deteriorated. So yeah... if you have to, go outside of Houston if you don't get into UH. You identify yourself as an African American female and the hardships that entail such a title. From my side of the field I can affirm and appreciate what it's like to constantly have to prove yourself. It definitely makes you a stronger person. You say people call you snobby, but I think you know what you're capable of. I get that crap a lot too, but I think it just comes with the territory from people who "don't know no better".

Good luck to you.
 

pharmdiva

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RXblitrx,

Thanks for the encouragement. I'm also a "little older." :) So, I completely understand that feeling of "let me hurry up and get on with it already." But you know what? I realized no matter how long it takes, it will be worth it. Pharmacy is an extremely interesting, ever-changing field that offers you just about anything you could want - whether it be retail, research, education, etc.. Not to mention the financial security. So, at the end of the day you will come out on top. Good luck to you, and please keep in touch. Feel free to email me anytime - especially since you are right here in Houston.:)
 

nguyenkd

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I go to UH so I know what school you're referring to. I have also heard about the bad rep of the school but I also know that a lot of qualified people attend that school. That whole university is having a lot of trouble (the money scandal and now the budget problems) but I hope everything works out. I had a classmate who transfered twice. She transfered to UH from somewhere else and then transferred again to AZ. Both times, she was pushed back a year. If you feel you are not getting the education you deserve perhaps it would be better to apply to another program since you seem to be very dissatisfied. You also have to think about how hard you worked to get into the program and the process of reapplying/transferring won't be fun.

I have heard that the NAPLEX pass rate for that school was very low compared to the other schools in TX. I believe that if you take an active part in your learning process, you should come out fine. Make the best of it so that when you go on rotations or graduate, you can show your colleagues and preceptors that your school can produce great pharmacists. Good luck with everything!
 
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