jonathon

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What is the difference between a clinical professor and a clinical instructor/lecturer?
 

Chinorean

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jonathon said:
What is the difference between a clinical professor and a clinical instructor/lecturer?
I think professors do research and are full employees of the university, a lecturer might practice in the university and teach or practice outside and teach.
 

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jonathon said:
What is the difference between a clinical professor and a clinical instructor/lecturer?
If it's like other graduate schooling (eg. law), then instructor is just an early step in the path to becoming a professor someday.
 
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vwhan

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Law2Doc said:
If it's like other graduate schooling (eg. law), then instructor is just an early step in the path to becoming a professor someday.
In the academic world it goes instructor, assistant prof, associate prof, full prof. I always get assist and associate mixed up so that order may be switched.
 

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jonathon said:
What is the difference between a clinical professor and a clinical instructor/lecturer?
Residents aka house officers are also known as clinical instructors at my institution. Then your run of the mill attending will be associate professor, next step above that toward tenure is assistant professor, then top of the food chain is professor. I think that's the pecking order (i may have switched associate and assistant, i'm not sure).

From my understanding, Professors have tenure meaning they techically cannot be fired (unless it is something that endangers someone's life or is something like sexual harrassment, etc), usually have lots of research, and in many cases, have pensions and other perks tagged on to their contracts.

sscooterguy
 

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sscooterguy said:
From my understanding, Professors have tenure meaning they techically cannot be fired (unless it is something that endangers someone's life or is something like sexual harrassment, etc), usually have lots of research, and in many cases, have pensions and other perks tagged on to their contracts.

sscooterguy
Tenure is actually becoming a rarity and thing of the past. Most professors don't have tenure any more.
 

njbmd

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jonathon said:
What is the difference between a clinical professor and a clinical instructor/lecturer?
Hi there,
It's called academic rank and generally indicate the pay scale. These usually go Lecturer/Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and then Professor. Professor Emeritus means retired professor and Endowed Professor means that you make big bucks. There is also Adjunct Professor which means that you are visitor with some rank. Clinical Professor means that you precept some type of student but you are non-tenured and not in a tenure track.

njbmd :)
 

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Law2Doc said:
Tenure is actually becoming a rarity and thing of the past. Most professors don't have tenure any more.
Hey, I'm rare!! :) :)

Although I agree that non-tenure track is becoming more common all the way up the academic ladder, I don't know of any data suggesting that tenure is rare or that "most professors" (meaning full profs?) aren't tenured. I believe it is very institution-dependent in the medical school world right now and depends if you're talking about primary research or clinical faculty. To be a bit more accurate, there is a large debate right now in research-oriented medical schools about the role and meaning of tenure. The real question isn't who should get tenure, but what does tenure mean at a research institution?

For those who are not practicing physicians, if they are given tenure and lose their funding, the school is sort of stuck with them and may not have enough to keep them busy. For those who are primarily practicing physicians, why should tenure matter to them? These are difficult questions that I am beginning to become involved in but still am learning the issues. This concept of tenure is somewhat different than the classic "academic freedom" concept of the past and I think more prevalent in non-medical settings.

Otherwise, njbmd has it right in terms of the sequence. My answer to the question of the OP would have been "20 years" :laugh:

Regards

OBP
 

MasterShake

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Law2Doc said:
Tenure is actually becoming a rarity and thing of the past. Most professors don't have tenure any more.
Where did you hear this? Are you talking about profession tenure track positions; e.g. medical school tenure positions? I think the number of tenure track positions is decreasing in academia, secondary to decreased funding and the cost effectiveness of lecturers/ instructors - but I wouldn't say it's a rarity or that most professors don't have tenure (yet anyways). I am about to start Grade 26 - med student with a PhD (that's right, I have evaded the "real world" for over three decades) and am yet to meet a professor or see a fellow grad (PhD) that was not looking for a tenure track position, fighting for tenure, already tenured, or bitter about not getting it/ or bitter that their position is non-tenured position.
 

ANCAdoc

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I do not know of one full professor that doesn't have tenure. I don't even know if they exist, to be honest!

Associate profs generally have tenure, but some do not. Being "promoted" (from asst to assocaite prof) is a separate process from being "tenured", though most "PTR" (promotion and tenure review) commitees review both at the same time. Thus, one can be promoted with tenure (rare).

Asst profs generally do not have tenure.
 

deuist

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Also, some clinical faculty are community physicians who volunteer their time to teach a few hours each year on a topic that they're familiar with.
 

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IUSM said:
I do not know of one full professor that doesn't have tenure. I don't even know if they exist, to be honest!

Associate profs generally have tenure, but some do not. Being "promoted" (from asst to assocaite prof) is a separate process from being "tenured", though most "PTR" (promotion and tenure review) commitees review both at the same time. Thus, one can be promoted with tenure (rare).

Asst profs generally do not have tenure.
In the University System of Georgia, a faculty member must be at least an assistant prof to be considered for tenure. An instructor is hired either in a tenure-track position or a 1-year temporary position (which can become a tenure-track position when a position becomes available). Interestingly enough, practice degress (non PhD or EdD) cannot be considered for full-professor). Full professor is a research faculty position.

As for adjunct professor, it is a part-time faculty position and gets paid for part-time work. In most medical and allied health professions, adjunct faculty often only work in the clinical areas.
 
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