kchan99

15+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2004
305
86
Maryland
Status
Attending Physician
No. Neurologists are not trained in psychotherapy. Most behavioral neurologists are interested in dementia. However, behavioral neurology fellowships are also open to psychiatrists under the subspecialty of "neuropsychiatry." Psychiatrists receive some training in psychotherapy during residency and may choose to offer psychotherapy. I know a few psychiatrists who are interested in dementia; they don't have psychotherapy practices. In fact, many of them aren't interested in garden variety anxiety and depression.

Anxiety and depression are fairly common issues. They are managed by PCP's most of the time. PCP's may refer patients for psychotherapy provided by psychologists (PhD or PsyD), social workers, and other counselors.
 
OP
H
Aug 13, 2016
27
0
No. Neurologists are not trained in psychotherapy. Most behavioral neurologists are interested in dementia. However, behavioral neurology fellowships are also open to psychiatrists under the subspecialty of "neuropsychiatry." Psychiatrists receive some training in psychotherapy during residency and may choose to offer psychotherapy. I know a few psychiatrists who are interested in dementia; they don't have psychotherapy practices. In fact, many of them aren't interested in garden variety anxiety and depression.

Anxiety and depression are fairly common issues. They are managed by PCP's most of the time. PCP's may refer patients for psychotherapy provided by psychologists (PhD or PsyD), social workers, and other counselors.
Thank you for the reply! Out of curiosity, what is the difference between a neuropsychiatrist and a behavioral neurologist... I read that they are the same and recognize as a single subspecialty.
 

kchan99

15+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2004
305
86
Maryland
Status
Attending Physician
Thank you for the reply! Out of curiosity, what is the difference between a neuropsychiatrist and a behavioral neurologist... I read that they are the same and recognize as a single subspecialty.
A behavioral neurologist completed a neurology residency. A neuropsychiatrist completed a psychiatry residency. Then both of them went to the same fellowship.

In historical times, there was no difference between a neurologist and a psychiatrist. A non-surgical neuro clinician practiced neurology, psychiatry, and neuropathology. A famous example was Alois Alzheimer. The founder of neurology, Jean-Martin Charcot, was a pathologist, and went on train Sigmund Freud!
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: NWwildcat2013
OP
H
Aug 13, 2016
27
0
A behavioral neurologist completed a neurology residency. A neuropsychiatrist completed a psychiatry residency. Then both of them went to the same fellowship.

In historical times, there was no difference between a neurologist and a psychiatrist. A non-surgical neuro clinician practiced neurology, psychiatry, and neuropathology. A famous example was Alois Alzheimer. The founder of neurology, Jean-Martin Charcot, was a pathologist, and went on train Sigmund Freud!
Oh ok so a behavioral neurologist and neuropsychiatriat complete two different residencies, but then after residency they specialize in the same thing and essentially do essentially the same work?

And yes, working in mental health I have been reading about that and it's interesting! That neurology and psychiatry used to be all one field but as time went on they split for superficial reasons (belief that mind/ brain were seperate).

Psychiatry became like the middle geound between neurology and psychology and there's now an interest to merge psychiatry back with neurology because of the understanding that the actual brain directly influences behavior and because of psychiatry's bad wrap of "medicalizing" all human suffering and/ or labeling something as a "disease" that needs to be fixed with medication when the issue might be more psychosocial in nature (ie.the pandemic of kids diagnosed with ADHD).

Working in the field of mental health, I can honeatly say I would love to see a re-merging of psychiatry an neurology... if a persons symptoms are really organic in nature, let the neurologist handle it and if it's psychosocial let the social worker or psychologist handle it, if it's a combination of both then collaborate on it.

Simply spending 5 minutes with the patient, throwing out a diagnosis that's supposedly a "chemical imbalance" without any actual test and giving a depakote/ abilify cocktail "see you in a month" regime just isn't working
 
OP
H
Aug 13, 2016
27
0
A behavioral neurologist completed a neurology residency. A neuropsychiatrist completed a psychiatry residency. Then both of them went to the same fellowship.

In historical times, there was no difference between a neurologist and a psychiatrist. A non-surgical neuro clinician practiced neurology, psychiatry, and neuropathology. A famous example was Alois Alzheimer. The founder of neurology, Jean-Martin Charcot, was a pathologist, and went on train Sigmund Freud!
Do you think that the two should re-merge?
 

Spinothalamic

2+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2016
39
31
There is currently an effort in psychiatry to research the effects of psychiatric treatments in a direct, quantifiable manner through advanced imaging studies such as nuclear imaging. This not only applies to psychiatric medications but also to psychotherapy. The research psychiatrists at my institution really are excited for this "new era" in psychiatry where our understanding of psych pathology will become much better.

On a side note, I think the crossover between neurology and psychiatry is a fascinating area. I've learned of quite a few neurological conditions which can feature psychosis as a symptom (limbic encephalitis, late-onset Tay sach's, even some types of stroke for example)