Sep 14, 2015
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0
Sorry in advance for how crazy neurotic this must seem. Application season brings out the worst in me. I'm originally from and attending medical school on the east coast. The year I was applying to medical school I moved to California and was working out there. Following admission, I took a leave of absence and continued to work in California for an additional two years (3 years in total) - paid taxes and everything for all 3 years. However, for the purposes of my medical school I was considered an in state student. The thing is I'd really like to go back to california and I hear it helps to be a California resident - where would I fall?
 

RangerBob

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Sep 16, 2012
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Technically it sounds like you're a CA resident-- I think you just have to live in CA for 2 years for a reason other than to get an education. That probably means you should have been paying out of state tuition if you're at an East Coast school... Though I don't know how things would work if you're technically an in-state resident when you're accepted but out-of-state resident when you apply. Still, that's water under the bridge and if your school considered you in-state then go with that.

That being said, I don't think being a CA resident makes much of a difference unless you're talking about medical school--it doesn't make much difference what state you're a resident of when you apply for residency. Programs do often like residents they think will stay in the area and may prefer people who grew up locally, but they really just want the best candidates who will graduate from the program. Of note, many programs (especially smaller ones) may not think you're actually serious about their program if you're not in-state, so they may not interview you and give you the chance to express how interested you are in them. But a simple phone call to the program coordinator during application season usually solves that pretty quick.

Still, if you list that you're a CA resident, it certainly won't hurt your chances--it can only help (just maybe not much). But then it creates a funny situation where you're acknowledging your not an in-state resident, which may or may not be an issue. And you're really only supposed to claim one state residency, so if you're claiming residency in the state of your medical school, you shouldn't be claiming CA residency. (But as I pointed out--I think you actually are a CA resident).

I'm sure others may have a different opinion about all this.
 

22031 Alum

At the baby factory.
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Jul 12, 2008
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With a few exceptions, your state of residency doesn't matter nearly as much for residency as it does for medical school. Sometimes the programs that have a clear regional draw will wonder whether or not you'd actually come, but expressed interest matters more for that than state of residency.
 

IlDestriero

Ether Man
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Nov 24, 2007
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If you have a legitimate reason to want to train and potentially live in a particular state, it may help your application a bit, but for the most part it comes down to scores, recommendations and the interview.
 
OP
E
Sep 14, 2015
2
0
Thank you everyone, stuck with the East Coast - I'd rather not get in trouble, and it doesn't seem like a huge advantage. I'm doing 2 aways in California so if that + calling programs doesn't convince them then that change in state of residency probably won't either.