usa_tigress

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How important is taking spanish in college and being good at it for medical school applications? I took 4 years in high school, but I'm still not fluent. If I volunteer in a spanish speaking country, is that good enough or do they want to see me taking it in college for a few years?
 

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usa_tigress said:
How important is taking spanish in college and being good at it for medical school applications? I took 4 years in high school, but I'm still not fluent. If I volunteer in a spanish speaking country, is that good enough or do they want to see me taking it in college for a few years?
The only way to teach those Mexicans that don't know English is to talk at them in English exclusively. They will have to catch on. Do not give into learning Spanish. If they're coming here to the land of opportunity they should work to become like the rest of us here.
 

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ChymeChancellor said:
If they're coming here to the land of opportunity they should work to become like the rest of us here.

Say that to an adcom and you might get docked for not being compassionate.
Spanish is very important in Texas in order to do your job as a physician. Not required, but very helpful. Especially if you go into EM.

I've heard San Antonio gives you bonus points for speaking Spanish.
 
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Because EVERYBODY (except me) in Texas speaks Spanish ONLY, you MUST learn Spanish if you want to even apply to a school in TX (Otherwise the Spanish-Only speaking ADCOMs won't be able to read your application.) If you don't speak Spanish, you might as well not apply here. Sorry.
 

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usa_tigress said:
How important is taking spanish in college and being good at it for medical school applications? I took 4 years in high school, but I'm still not fluent. If I volunteer in a spanish speaking country, is that good enough or do they want to see me taking it in college for a few years?
No, you don't need to take college level Spanish. And knowing Spanish won't give you a big edge. But if you're going to be going to medical school in an area that has lots of Spanish speakers, you'll need it.

If you have four years of high school Spanish, unless you were completely asleep at the wheel, the basics of it will come back to you very quickly. And while everyone claims to "speak Spanish", realize that lots of folks are talking about basic Spanish with a few days of study from a medical Spanish book.

Learn the language, but don't sweat feeling like you have to have it on your transcript.
 

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jota_jota said:
Because EVERYBODY (except me) in Texas speaks Spanish ONLY, you MUST learn Spanish if you want to even apply to a school in TX (Otherwise the Spanish-Only speaking ADCOMs won't be able to read your application.) If you don't speak Spanish, you might as well not apply here. Sorry.
It's true. The minute you cross into the state - excuse me, el estado - all the road signs immediately turn into Spanish. Even the radio stations. You could be listening to Coldplay, and all of a sudden The Scientist would turn into El Científico. You might as well head for Cancun, because you're basically in Mexico already. :eek:
 

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Its true. i hear texas loves mexicans.


On another note if you can speak converstional spanish, but can't write a book, be clear about that if it comes up in an interview. You don't want some adcom grilling on the state of healthcare in spanish, i heard it done before. Make it clear that you can be understood and understand. Honestly you will have a better chance in landing residencies because you will have a wider patient base in all specialties.
 

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I am kind of like you. I took 3 years of Spanish in high school but remember very little. I am spending my senior year at my university taking Spanish classes. I intend on practicing in Texas (possibly Family Medicine or EM) so I definitely feel like I need to be able to converse en espanol. It won't help my application (because its too late) but I think it will help in the long run. Do it because it will help you be what you need to be, not so you can impress adcoms. There are better things to impress them with ;)
 

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I was a Spanish major in college, and as far as being conversational in Spanish, I would suggest taking a few oral communication classes. Those classes will help you the most in attaining spoken proficiency. Also volunteering anywhere with native Spanish speakers would be good because they tend to speak really fast and you can't really learn to understand that accent in the classroom. If you have the chance to volunteer abroad that would be awesome too- I've heard Child Family Health International has some great programs where you can go on rotations in Latin America.
 

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ChymeChancellor said:
The only way to teach those Mexicans that don't know English is to talk at them in English exclusively. They will have to catch on. Do not give into learning Spanish. If they're coming here to the land of opportunity they should work to become like the rest of us here.

I can see your idea here, but it's misguided. Someone's healthcare is too important to be ****ing around and speaking a language the patient doesn't understand. Sure, go lobby congress to require mandatory English classes for immigrants, but it's not feasible to completely phase out Spanish any time soon in Texas healthcare. Knowing Spanish is a huge advantage in the real world of medicine in Texas. I don't know what kind of advantage it gives someone on their med school application, but when you're actually practicing medicine it matters a great deal to be specific when communicating about another person's wellbeing.

To the OP - you'd be surprised at how far your 4 years of highschool Spanish will take you. Medical Spanish is nice because there are a lot of cognates, and it's easy to use your body as a visual [haha to a degree of appropriateness]. But since you already have a foundation and know the important verbs, it's basically just making some flashcards and learning new vocab words. You've already done the hard work, plus the Spanish doesn't have to be perfect for someone to understand. I know Spanish speaking patients use English often with me and they can get the point across.

But for medication dosage and treatment...it's important to know what you're doing hehe.
 

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no. there's always a question that asks what languages you know. if you feel that you are able to communicate in _____________ language, by all means put it down!

wouldn't it look strange if you answered that question as only knowing english, but then took like 15 hours of college spanish?
 

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interstellar said:
no. there's always a question that asks what languages you know. if you feel that you are able to communicate in _____________ language, by all means put it down!
The only area on AMCAS that asks about foreign languages, so far as I know, is the checkbox for fluency. And you'd be a fool to check it unless you spent years living in a Spanish-only spoken environment.

You can mention speaking Spanish as a Work/Experiences or better yet, work it in to an existing one. "I loved working at the clinic, where my ability to take basic patient histories in Spanish assisted the staff... " etc. etc.
 

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ChymeChancellor said:
The only way to teach those Mexicans that don't know English is to talk at them in English exclusively. They will have to catch on. Do not give into learning Spanish. If they're coming here to the land of opportunity they should work to become like the rest of us here.
wow. congratulations. you're officially a badass. your parents must be proud. next time "those Mexicans" only speak Spanish to you, tell them to learn English and see how much they don't give a fu.ck about what you think.
 
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Its true. i hear texas loves mexicans.
no tienes razon
Pero la gente de Tejas le gusta "Tex Mex."
Siempre, cuando dices con Texans (gosh they are weird...haha I am truly insulting both sides of my family) la (or is it el...yo no requerdo) tema de la conversacion (lo siento pero no tengo la programa para escribir en espanol en mi computadora) es "por que Tex Mex es la mejor comida (or is it la comida mejor...that last part might be totally wrong...but this as good a time as ever to practice...Soooooooo, RAFA and anyone else who speaks spanish...please correct me where I am wrong...dang I have to practice)



Vox Animo said:
Its true. i hear texas loves mexicans.


On another note if you can speak converstional spanish, but can't write a book, be clear about that if it comes up in an interview. You don't want some adcom grilling on the state of healthcare in spanish, i heard it done before. Make it clear that you can be understood and understand. Honestly you will have a better chance in landing residencies because you will have a wider patient base in all specialties.
 

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riceman04 said:
no tienes razon
Pero la gente de Tejas le gusta "Tex Mex."
Siempre, cuando dices con Texans (gosh they are weird...haha I am truly insulting both sides of my family) la (or is it el...yo no requerdo) tema de la conversacion (lo siento pero no tengo la programa para escribir en espanol en mi computadora) es "por que Tex Mex es la mejor comida (or is it la comida mejor...that last part might be totally wrong...but this as good a time as ever to practice...Soooooooo, RAFA and anyone else who speaks spanish...please correct me where I am wrong...dang I have to practice)
tu espanol es bueno. es probable que mi espanol sea (?) el mismo. al OP, espanol no es necesario para apply (como se dice?) a las escuelas medico de tejas, pero para trabajar en los hospitals (?), el espanol te ayuda mucho.


haha that was horrible.
 

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usa_tigress said:
How important is taking spanish in college and being good at it for medical school applications? I took 4 years in high school, but I'm still not fluent. If I volunteer in a spanish speaking country, is that good enough or do they want to see me taking it in college for a few years?

Or check out your local hispanic newspaper

http://www.elconquistadornews.com/

This is for the hispanic-american population around northern illinois. Almost all of the articles are side by side in spanish and english and since its a paper

Just for fun: http://www.notam02.no/~hcholm/altlang/ht/Mexican_Spanish.1.html#so92
 

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riceman04 said:
no tienes razon
Pero la gente de Tejas le gusta "Tex Mex."
Siempre, cuando dices con Texans (gosh they are weird...haha I am truly insulting both sides of my family) la (or is it el...yo no requerdo) tema de la conversacion (lo siento pero no tengo la programa para escribir en espanol en mi computadora) es "por que Tex Mex es la mejor comida (or is it la comida mejor...that last part might be totally wrong...but this as good a time as ever to practice...Soooooooo, RAFA and anyone else who speaks spanish...please correct me where I am wrong...dang I have to practice)
es la mejor comida , segundo se dice no tengo el programa y tercero yo no recuerdo:D



yourmom25 said:
tu espanol es bueno. es probable que mi espanol sea (?) el mismo. al OP, espanol no es necesario para apply (como se dice?) a las escuelas medico de tejas, pero para trabajar en los hospitals (?), el espanol te ayuda mucho.


haha that was horrible.

entonces aqui se dice solicitar a las escuelas de medicina de tejas , pero para trabajar en los hospitales :D
 

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jota_jota said:
Because EVERYBODY (except me) in Texas speaks Spanish ONLY, you MUST learn Spanish if you want to even apply to a school in TX (Otherwise the Spanish-Only speaking ADCOMs won't be able to read your application.) If you don't speak Spanish, you might as well not apply here. Sorry.
I'm sorry, but you were just arguing on another thread about how you were not a racist.
I don't know if you're just joking here, but take into consideration that maybe joking like this got you in trouble the first time.

By the way, to the OP, you do NOT need to know Spanish for med school in TX, although it is useful.

Plus, an extra language is never a waste, whatever language it may be. It's culture. And it looks like some people here need some of that.
 

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Por cierto, no quise quedarme atras con esto de escribir en Espanol.
La verdad es que el espanol de algunos de ustedes es muy bueno y se que les sera util algun dia con sus pacientes, aunque a la vez he notado que hay muchas palabras que les son dificiles de recordar.

Yo considero que la mayoria de las veces lo mas conveniente es una persona que hable el idioma de forma nativa. Me refiero a personas que aun hablan Espanol en su casa/con su familia, y no a aquellas que son Hispanos pero que solo hablan un poco, o que entienden un poco. Muchas veces es dificil comprender o explicar cosas complicadas en un idioma extranjero. Tambien es complicado entender inflexiones de voz, doble sentido, tener un sentido general de la cultura, etc, a menos de que el doctor sea nativo o que haya vivido por lo menos unos cuantos anos entre esa cultura.

Pero muchas felicidades a aquellas personas que hacen un esfuerzo por aprender un idioma extranjero, es una necesidad grande no solo en los Estados Unidos, sino en el mundo entero. La mayoria de los extranjeros habla un idioma aparte del suyo, asi que no veo porque en Estados Unidos no queremos aprender otros idiomas aparte del Ingles.

Yo lo considero simplemente una cuestion de cultura general y de deseo de aprender. Nunca esta de mas. :love:

PS. I wish I could put all the accents and the thing over the n~ to make the en~e, but my computer doesn't take the codes. It would read much easier with those. If your Spanish is good enough you'll catch the phrases where the lack of accents make the sentences sound funny or mean something different. ;) :p
 

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ylitia said:
es la mejor comida , segundo se dice no tengo el programa y tercero yo no recuerdo:D






entonces aqui se dice solicitar a las escuelas de medicina de tejas , pero para trabajar en los hospitales :D
muchas gracias
 

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topogigio said:
I'm sorry, but you were just arguing on another thread about how you were not a racist.
Saying that everyone in Texas only speaks spanish is wrong, but that's not racism. Where in his post did he say a thing about race?

People are ultrasensitive about these things and it's ridiculous. People that spend their time calling other people racists are just inflating the problem.
 

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topogigio said:
I'm sorry, but you were just arguing on another thread about how you were not a racist.
I don't know if you're just joking here, but take into consideration that maybe joking like this got you in trouble the first time.

By the way, to the OP, you do NOT need to know Spanish for med school in TX, although it is useful.

Plus, an extra language is never a waste, whatever language it may be. It's culture. And it looks like some people here need some of that.
Holy Sh!+! I just got called a racist again?!?!?!?! If anything, the OP is more racist than I for wondering if it was required to speak Spanish in TX!!!!!!!!

I was just giving a stupid answer to a stupid question. Is it a stupid question? YES, the OP could find out the answer by volunteering and/or shadowing a doctor for 15 minutes to see that most doctors DO NOT speak Spanish in TX. There is usually at least one Spanish-speaking nurse on duty at all times.

For crissake, look up the definition of racist before you throw such slanderous terms around. People of ALL races speak Spanish, so how does language have anything to do with race? Also, aren't both Hispanics and Whites technically Caucasion? (although I'll admit that most applications, etc, have Caucasion -- Hispanic and Caucasion -- Non-Hispanic as different races.)

Once again, I hope that one day you call someone else a racist, it ends up causing them damages, and they sue your ass off for treble damages from the slander.

Doesn't anyone see that recklessly calling a non-racist a racist is just as bad as making racial slurs? Or, am I in the Twilight Zone here? What got me into trouble before wasn't my sarcasm, but stupid people (actually only one stupid person,) who feel that anytime a person disagrees with them, it must be because that person is a racist.

EDIT: I guess I AM in the Twilight Zone -- I forgot that another poster in this thread said that "The only way to teach those Mexicans.....is to only speak English"...and I'M the one that gets called a racist, and what HE said is OK. This is unreal.....

PS: topogigio, have you ever even been to TX?

EDIT2: Those of you that still think I am a racist, take a look at my screen name (Jota is one of my nicknames -- Do you think I got that one from my English-only speaking friends?)
 
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usa_tigress said:
How important is taking spanish in college and being good at it for medical school applications? I took 4 years in high school, but I'm still not fluent. If I volunteer in a spanish speaking country, is that good enough or do they want to see me taking it in college for a few years?
If you take it in college for a few years, you might be able to get by. I lived in Starr County (right in the Rio Grande) and I spoke spanish all day long. I ordered Jack in the Box (Joaquine en la Caja) in spanish; I bought groceries in spanish... it was pretty much requisite.

For all the people who have littered this thread with complaints, speaking spanish is a reality. Deal with it. Don't be a xenophobe. Learn spanish because it will m ake you a better doctor.
 

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Dude guys, Jota was just making a joke. I thought it was funny. Maybe because I am from Texas. Anyways, give him a break. :(

I work with Spanish-speakers at a clinic, and it helps to bring back that high school Spanish. :love: You're definitely right about how hanging out with native-speakers gives you more insight about expressions and inflections. It's plenty useful as a doctor here, but hospitals that have a large Spanish-speaking patient base usually have translators for you. However, sometimes it's quicker to ask the patient in the next bed to translate for you instead of waiting for the translator! :laugh: Texas is just that cool.

Ok so I wanna play translator. Tell me if I'm right.
_________________________________________________________________
topogigio said:
Por cierto, no quise quedarme atras con esto de escribir en Espanol.
La verdad es que el espanol de algunos de ustedes es muy bueno y se que les sera util algun dia con sus pacientes, aunque a la vez he notado que hay muchas palabras que les son dificiles de recordar.
[???], I don't want to be left behind in all this spanish writing.
The truth is that the Spansih of some of you is very good and will be of use someday with your patients, although at the time I have noticed that there are many words that are difficult to remember.

topogigio said:
Yo considero que la mayoria de las veces lo mas conveniente es una persona que hable el idioma de forma nativa. Me refiero a personas que aun hablan Espanol en su casa/con su familia, y no a aquellas que son Hispanos pero que solo hablan un poco, o que entienden un poco. Muchas veces es dificil comprender o explicar cosas complicadas en un idioma extranjero. Tambien es complicado entender inflexiones de voz, doble sentido, tener un sentido general de la cultura, etc, a menos de que el doctor sea nativo o que haya vivido por lo menos unos cuantos anos entre esa cultura.
I think that the majority of the time the most convenient is a person who speaks the native form of the language. I reference people who have spoken Spanish at home/with their family, and not just those who are Hispanic but only speak a little, or who understand little. Many times it is difficult to understand or explain complicated things in a foreign language. Also it is hard to understand inflexions of the voice, double meanings, to have a general feeling of the culture, etc, unless the doctor is a native or has lived at least a few years in this culture.

topogigio said:
Pero muchas felicidades a aquellas personas que hacen un esfuerzo por aprender un idioma extranjero, es una necesidad grande no solo en los Estados Unidos, sino en el mundo entero. La mayoria de los extranjeros habla un idioma aparte del suyo, asi que no veo porque en Estados Unidos no queremos aprender otros idiomas aparte del Ingles.
But congratulations to those who have made an effort to learn a foreign language, it is a great necessity not only in the United States, but in the entire world. The majority of foreigners speak a language other than their own, but here I don't see that(?) because in the United States we don't want to learn languages other than English.

topogigio said:
Yo lo considero simplemente una cuestion de cultura general y de deseo de aprender. Nunca esta de mas. :love:
I think it is simply a question of the general culture and of a desire to learn. Nothing more.
________________________________________________________________

That was fun. How'd I do??? :D
 
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jota_jota said:
Holy Sh!+! I just got called a racist again?!?!?!?! If anything, the OP is more racist than I for wondering if it was required to speak Spanish in TX!!!!!!!!

I was just giving a stupid answer to a stupid question. Is it a stupid question? YES, the OP could find out the answer by volunteering and/or shadowing a doctor for 15 minutes to see that most doctors DO NOT speak Spanish in TX. There is usually at least one Spanish-speaking nurse on duty at all times.

Of course I know a lot of doctors don't speak Spanish in Texas because I HAVE shadowed them. I do agree that it is helpful and not required but I was just wondering if the med schools in Texas placed that much emphasis on taking it since I had heard from a few people that they cared a lot about it.
 

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topogigio said:
PS. I wish I could put all the accents and the thing over the n~ to make the en~e, but my computer doesn't take the codes. It would read much easier with those. If your Spanish is good enough you'll catch the phrases where the lack of accents make the sentences sound funny or mean something different. ;) :p

Prospero ano nuevo to you too! :laugh:
 
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jota_jota said:
Holy Sh!+! I just got called a racist again?!?!?!?! If anything, the OP is more racist than I for wondering if it was required to speak Spanish in TX!!!!!!!!

I was just giving a stupid answer to a stupid question. Is it a stupid question? YES, the OP could find out the answer by volunteering and/or shadowing a doctor for 15 minutes to see that most doctors DO NOT speak Spanish in TX. There is usually at least one Spanish-speaking nurse on duty at all times.

Of course I know a lot of doctors don't speak Spanish in Texas because I HAVE shadowed them. I do agree that it is helpful and not required but I was just wondering if the med schools in Texas placed that much emphasis on taking it since I had heard from a few people that they cared a lot about it. Thanks for everyone's advice.
 

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usa_tigress said:
I do agree that it is helpful and not required but I was just wondering if the med schools in Texas placed that much emphasis on taking it since I had heard from a few people that they cared a lot about it.
Well, if you are right, then that is good to know. I had 5 years in Junior-High/High School, and have kept it up enough (thanks to one of my best friends/co-workers, who happens to be Hispanic and keeps coming by my office like every 15 minutes this morning to see who else is calling me a racist :) ) While I don't consider myself fluent, I know enough to be dangerous.

If, after being exposed to clinical medicine here in TX, you really believe that it would be a useful way to spend your time, then just do it.
 

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Wow - this thread got confusing in a hurry. Riceman, I think your Spanish was good - I've always heard that getting the message across is 90% of the battle. The finer points are just icing on the cake. Re: jota^2, he was kidding - let's all take deep breaths. :)

Re: tigress, since your q's been answered, I'll blab a bit more. You don't need to know it (since, as jota pointed out, many people who know both will be around you), but it never hurts to learn the fastest-growing language in the country. If you end up working in an environment where both languages are spoken, it's quite possible you'll pick up a lot of it casually, depending on whether you tune in or tune out when you hear it.

And finally people, to quote someone, you need to open and close the boxes. [ QUOTE ] opens a box - remove the spaces before and after the word "quote", while [ /QUOTE ] closes a box - again, remove the spaces.
 

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Rafa said:
And finally people, to quote someone, you need to open and close the boxes. [ QUOTE ] opens a box - remove the spaces before and after the word "quote", while [ /QUOTE ] closes a box - again, remove the spaces.
Just fixed mine. Sometimes I end up cutting out the "]" by accident when I trim stuff from the quote. Not sure why that ends up in my "blind spot."
 

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I'm married to a Texan, and I don't speak Spanish. No problems yet.
 
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jackieMD2007 said:
I'm married to a Texan, and I don't speak Spanish. No problems yet.
Just watch your back when ordering Tex-Mex. I've got a loose translation for you. "Fajita" actually means "cooked by God's hand." "Sopapilla" means "pocket of love" or - in some isolated areas - "honey pouch of Jesus."

Trying to keep you apprised.


mmMmMmmMmm..gurgle...chyme..pepsinogen..gurgle..mmmMMm
 

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SitraAchra said:
mmMmMmmMmm..gurgle...chyme..pepsinogen..gurgle..mmmMMm
:laugh: :smuggrin: :laugh: :smuggrin: :laugh: :laugh:

now we can hijack this thread and start talking about the physiology and biochemistry of digestion!

Edit: native Texan my whole life, and I have to say, it's not that big of a deal. I've been shadowing and there was always someone there who could translate. So while UTSA might give you brownie points for it, I don't think it'd keep you out of their school either.
 

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SitraAchra said:
Just watch your back when ordering Tex-Mex. I've got a loose translation for you. "Fajita" actually means "cooked by God's hand." "Sopapilla" means "pocket of love" or - in some isolated areas - "honey pouch of Jesus."

Trying to keep you apprised.


mmMmMmmMmm..gurgle...chyme..pepsinogen..gurgle..mmmMMm
mmMmMmmMMm I love chyme!

I am the ChymeChancellor!!!!!
 

SitraAchra

Attending Anesthesiologist
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I had a philosophical discussion with a friend the other night. We determined the only difference between chyme and vomit is location. It kind of blew my mind.


I might have been drinking at the time.
 

topogigio

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Jun 28, 2006
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mychelle774 said:
Dude guys, Jota was just making a joke. I thought it was funny. Maybe because I am from Texas. Anyways, give him a break. :(

I work with Spanish-speakers at a clinic, and it helps to bring back that high school Spanish. :love: You're definitely right about how hanging out with native-speakers gives you more insight about expressions and inflections. It's plenty useful as a doctor here, but hospitals that have a large Spanish-speaking patient base usually have translators for you. However, sometimes it's quicker to ask the patient in the next bed to translate for you instead of waiting for the translator! :laugh: Texas is just that cool.

Ok so I wanna play translator. Tell me if I'm right.
Okay, let me see if you got everything ;)
_________________________________________________________________


[???], I don't want to be left behind in all this spanish writing.
The truth is that the Spansih of some of you is very good and will be of use someday with your patients, although at the time I have noticed that there are many words that are difficult to remember.
This is correct, except I said that I have noticed some of the words are difficult to remember for some people (of the ones who have posted here).

I think that the majority of the time the most convenient is a person who speaks the native form of the language. I reference (this is supposed to be: am talking about) people who have spoken Spanish at home/with their family, and not just (erase this word) those who are Hispanic but only speak a little, or who understand little. Many times it is difficult to understand or explain complicated things in a foreign language. Also it is hard to understand inflexions of the voice, double meanings, to have a general feeling of the culture, etc, unless the doctor is a native or has lived at least a few years in this culture.
I have inserted some corrections above :)

But congratulations to those who have made an effort to learn a foreign language, it is a great necessity not only in the United States, but in the entire world. The majority of foreigners speak a language other than their own, but here I don't see that(?) because (erase last two words and insert "why" instead) in the United States we don't want to learn languages other than English.
A little correction above.

I think it is simply a question of the general culture and of a desire to learn. Nothing more. (Incorrect...that was supposed to mean something like "it's never a waste", "you can never know too many languages"...I can't really find a literal translation...I'd have to think about it more.)
That was a good translation overall. :thumbup: Good Job!

________________________________________________________________
 

goodoldalky

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Jul 6, 2006
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interstellar said:
no. there's always a question that asks what languages you know. if you feel that you are able to communicate in _____________ language, by all means put it down!

wouldn't it look strange if you answered that question as only knowing english, but then took like 15 hours of college spanish?
If you check a foreign language in one of these boxes, you should be prepared to have an interview in that language. 15 hours is nothing in the scheme of things. 15 hours puts you at the language efficiency of about a 3 year old.
 

goodoldalky

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Jul 6, 2006
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notdeadyet said:
And knowing Spanish won't give you a big edge.
I disagree. A truly bilingual applicant would be all but guaranteed a spot in medical school, even with below average scores.

Persons who are proficient in Spanish (albeit not fluent), with a good working knowledge (esp. if it is medically-related Spanish), would also get a boost. And by this, I mean have taken 7, 8, 10 years of Spanish (with a considerable number of hours in college). I am of the personal belief that no matter how many years you spend in the classroom, you will not become fluent. I think it takes some time living overseas or across the border (or in some capacity, dealing with Spanish constantly), in order to become fluent. But something is better than nothing, and the fact is that Spanish is becoming more and more common every day. I don't know of a single hospital in Texas that doesn't need some type of patient accommodation now.

If your question is, will three Spanish classes give applicant X an advantage over applicant Y? I'd say no. I wouldn't throw beginner Spanish classes into your schedule with the thought that 8 months of study is going to get you into medical school.
 

topogigio

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Jun 28, 2006
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goodoldalky said:
I disagree. A truly bilingual applicant would be all but guaranteed a spot in medical school, even with below average scores.

Persons who are proficient in Spanish (albeit not fluent), with a good working knowledge (esp. if it is medically-related Spanish), would also get a boost. And by this, I mean have taken 7, 8, 10 years of Spanish (with a considerable number of hours in college). I am of the personal belief that no matter how many years you spend in the classroom, you will not become fluent. I think it takes some time living overseas or across the border (or in some capacity, dealing with Spanish constantly), in order to become fluent. But something is better than nothing, and the fact is that Spanish is becoming more and more common every day. I don't know of a single hospital in Texas that doesn't need some type of patient accommodation now.

If your question is, will three Spanish classes give applicant X an advantage over applicant Y? I'd say no. I wouldn't throw beginner Spanish classes into your schedule with the thought that 8 months of study is going to get you into medical school.
I really agree with the bold statement above. Classroom Spanish won't get you too far in a non-rehearsed conversation.
I didn't learn English until I was around 12-13, in a classroom (grammar rules, mostly). However, today many people are surprised to know this because they say I don't have an accent, and I can write English better than most native speakers. Do you guys want to know the secret???

Every day, I would watch TV in English, and I would try to repeat whatever people said, trying to replicate the sounds exactly as they said it. That's how I got rid of the accent and how I learned many of the expressions/words that you won't learn in a classroom. Watch, Listen, repeat, listen, repeat, repeat, repeat.
You might look like an idiot for doing it, but who cares?
Obviously, you'll have to practice with real people at some point, but I found this technique to be extremely helpful.

There are Spanish-speaking channels all across the country to which you can tune and watch soap operas or the news or anything else that you might like. Try Univision or Telemundo (which I think are nationwide...) :love:
...by the way, Hispanic soap operas are so much better than American ones!

Take Care :laugh:
 
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