Aug 12, 2014
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Do MD medical schools necessarily care what you did for work during your college years?

For example, would having had a position as a paid lab intern in your university be considered more valuable than having had one as a bartender or a waiter?
 

gonnif

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Do MD medical schools necessarily care what you did for work during your college years?

For example, would having had a position as a paid lab intern in your university be considered more valuable than having had one as a bartender or a waiter?
It can add to your EC, Research , and Clinical resume.
 
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Cotterpin

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Being a bartender or waiter would be a good way to get used to dealing with difficult people and high stress.
 
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mikil100

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Do MD medical schools necessarily care what you did for work during your college years?

For example, would having had a position as a paid lab intern in your university be considered more valuable than having had one as a bartender or a waiter?
It doesn't hurt. If you've been doing it for a while it shows you have dedication and work ethic. As a bar tender it also shows you have dealt with many different people.
 

italiancowgirl

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What matters most is that you can show you have gained skills and are a better person because of your experiences. The type of experience does not always matter as much as the lessons learned. I encourage different jobs but try to dig into each opportunity and learn more than just how to make money. You are building yourself into a more rounded and capable person! (I worked in education positions, research, food service, veterinary offices, secretary positions, and more! Each taught me a little bit more about myself and helped me to cope better in medicine)
 

Gandyy

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Most pre-meds haven't worked a day in their life.

Work experience makes you stand out and it gives you something to talk about in interviews.
 

md-2020

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Most pre-meds haven't worked a day in their life.
I don't believe this to be true.

Work experience isn't going to be a critical part of your app.
 

GrapesofRath

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Most pre-meds haven't worked a day in their life.

Work experience makes you stand out and it gives you something to talk about in interviews.
This is a bit of a hyperbolic statement(I wouldn't classify most pre-meds as having zero work experience) but the key thing in all of this is is context. Many pre-meds come from very wealthy backgrounds. Others don't. ADCOMs do account to some extent for the background you come from; those who come from lower SES backgrounds and where it's clear they have to make ends meet every semester through blue collar jobs will have their EC's look at differently and from a different perspective from your generic pre-med who has both parents as physicians.

Work experience doesn't work the same way as artificially "boosting" your resume the way some might think a publication or program like Americorps might. It provides context for the lifestyle you've had to live, and can show certain skills you've developed(ie communication skills, team management skills, work ethic) that can be viewed in a positive light, especially if these become apparent in an interview. Work experience can be as "critical" or "not critical" part of your application as you make it and what it says about you. What people often mistake work experience and what it can do for you and where they are wrong is in thinking a) work experience can provide an excuse for mediocre grades b) that work experience excuses you from the responsibilities all pre-meds must show(clinical exposure, volunteering to demonstrate altruism) etc.
 

Gandyy

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This is a bit of a hyperbolic statement(I wouldn't classify most pre-meds as having zero work experience) but the key thing in all of this is is context. Many pre-meds come from very wealthy backgrounds. Others don't. ADCOMs do account to some extent for the background you come from; those who come from lower SES backgrounds and where it's clear they have to make ends meet every semester through blue collar jobs will have their EC's look at differently and from a different perspective from your generic pre-med who has both parents as physicians.

Work experience doesn't work the same way as artificially "boosting" your resume the way some might think a publication or program like Americorps might. It provides context for the lifestyle you've had to live, and can show certain skills you've developed(ie communication skills, team management skills, work ethic) that can be viewed in a positive light, especially if these become apparent in an interview. Work experience can be as "critical" or "not critical" part of your application as you make it and what it says about you. What people often mistake work experience and what it can do for you and where they are wrong is in thinking a) work experience can provide an excuse for mediocre grades b) that work experience excuses you from the responsibilities all pre-meds must show(clinical exposure, volunteering to demonstrate altruism) etc.
Yea its probably a bit of an exaggeration but you get my point.
 

sharkbyte

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I don't believe this to be true.

Work experience isn't going to be a critical part of your app.
Probably not as critical as MCAT, GPA, clinical experience, etc. and definitely not a deal maker/breaker but I do think adcoms look favorably upon work experience.