• SDN Site Updates

    Hey everyone! The site will be down for approximately 2 hours on Thursday, August 5th for site updates.

  • How To ACE Your Medical School Interview

    In this webinar hosted by SDN with experts from BeMo Academic Consulting, you will learn a simple five-step process to help you translate your interview invitation into an acceptance.

jumpmanv15

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2012
679
99
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Does anyone know anything about any AOA Optho programs? I know there are a few but don't have much info on them
 

abolt18

Cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool
7+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2012
3,466
2,673
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I've often wondered the same thing. Eyes are what interested me in medicine from the start, but I'm also drawn to Osteopathy based on the mindset and OMM. I had always assumed I'll likely have to take the USMLE and match into an MD residency.
 

JRjcu08

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2008
283
25
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Go to opportunities.osteopathic.org and search for ophthalmology residencies. No allopathic programs are dually accredited ACGME/AOA. I think there are about 13 programs in DO ophtho, each program usually takes only 1 resident per year, a couple programs take 2, and I think there might be one program that takes 3. I had been planning to apply DO ophtho, but can't now for medical reasons, so I've talked to a few DO ophtho residents who say networking (going to meetings, getting to know the program director) is the best way to make yourself known if ophtho is really what you want. Having good grades and doing well on the COMLEX are important, but a program has to know and like you to accept you. I know someone who had a way-less-than-stellar COMLEX score and was the 1 resident who was chosen at a program. You need to rotate at as many programs as possible to get your face out, and also have skills/knowledge of/show interest in the field. Also, I've heard of programs asking you to spell ophthalmology on an interview, so don't forget about the first 'h'. As for the quality of programs, a DO program director once told me "the best ophtho residency is the one that accepts you".

All that being said, getting into an MD ophtho residency is theoretically possible but incredibly rare. If you check the ophthalmology section on here you'll see info about the people who matched MD programs, maybe 1-5 residents per year match. In this case, it seems like you need to be practically #1 in your class, kill the USMLE, know someone, do research, etc. etc. etc.....

Also, if you really do want to do ophtho, there is basically no use whatsoever for OMM in ophtho practice. (I mean, maybe cranial... or cervical stuff, but even the DO ophtho office I've been to doesn't have tables for OMM). If your goal is an MD residency, I'd apply to an allopathic schools. If you still for some reason really want to learn OMM that you'd rarely if ever use in practice, go to a DO school- but you'll need to be a superstar to get into an allopathic program.

Good luck :) Ophthalmology is a really interesting field, I was a tech in an ophtho office during most of undergrad and as repetitive as it is, I really enjoyed it. If my health didn't prevent my from applying, my plan would have been to only take the COMLEX and rotate at as many programs as possible (which would involve using vacation time for rotations), and also apply at programs in another field as backup since there are so few ophtho spots.
 

jumpmanv15

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2012
679
99
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Go to opportunities.osteopathic.org and search for ophthalmology residencies. No allopathic programs are dually accredited ACGME/AOA. I think there are about 13 programs in DO ophtho, each program usually takes only 1 resident per year, a couple programs take 2, and I think there might be one program that takes 3. I had been planning to apply DO ophtho, but can't now for medical reasons, so I've talked to a few DO ophtho residents who say networking (going to meetings, getting to know the program director) is the best way to make yourself known if ophtho is really what you want. Having good grades and doing well on the COMLEX are important, but a program has to know and like you to accept you. I know someone who had a way-less-than-stellar COMLEX score and was the 1 resident who was chosen at a program. You need to rotate at as many programs as possible to get your face out, and also have skills/knowledge of/show interest in the field. Also, I've heard of programs asking you to spell ophthalmology on an interview, so don't forget about the first 'h'. As for the quality of programs, a DO program director once told me "the best ophtho residency is the one that accepts you".

All that being said, getting into an MD ophtho residency is theoretically possible but incredibly rare. If you check the ophthalmology section on here you'll see info about the people who matched MD programs, maybe 1-5 residents per year match. In this case, it seems like you need to be practically #1 in your class, kill the USMLE, know someone, do research, etc. etc. etc.....

Also, if you really do want to do ophtho, there is basically no use whatsoever for OMM in ophtho practice. (I mean, maybe cranial... or cervical stuff, but even the DO ophtho office I've been to doesn't have tables for OMM). If your goal is an MD residency, I'd apply to an allopathic schools. If you still for some reason really want to learn OMM that you'd rarely if ever use in practice, go to a DO school- but you'll need to be a superstar to get into an allopathic program.

Good luck :) Ophthalmology is a really interesting field, I was a tech in an ophtho office during most of undergrad and as repetitive as it is, I really enjoyed it. If my health didn't prevent my from applying, my plan would have been to only take the COMLEX and rotate at as many programs as possible (which would involve using vacation time for rotations), and also apply at programs in another field as backup since there are so few ophtho spots.

hey i am actually a student at an osteopathic school getting ready to take my comlex so i am going to try and take the DO route in, i know its highly competitive but thanks for hte info i will def take that into account. thanks for the advice and hope you feel better!
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 9 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.