DO Schools ranked by first choice residency match rates?

Jun 10, 2017
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Does this exist on a school by school basis for each specialty? I know NRMP shows the match rate for all DO schools combined but I would like the percentage of a specific school's students who placed into their first choice. Does this exist? If not why?
 
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AnatomyGrey12

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bears1992

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I've heard that KCU recently has the highest match rate. I'd be interesting to know if it's because their students have higher board scores of if the name of the school has weight.
 
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AnatomyGrey12

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I've heard that KCU recently has the highest match rate. I'd be interesting to know if it's because their students have higher board scores of if the name of the school has weight.
Board scores. DO school names only matter for the residencies in the immediate geographical region.
 

AnatomyGrey12

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Actually, it matters a whole lo
Not really no. All the number shows is where people match on their rank list, and the percent that match in their top 3 is in the 90%+ range or something like that. It tells you nothing about if someone actually wants field x but aren't competetive, or really wanted to go to programs x, y, or z but none of those programs extended an interview.
 
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There isn't a lot of data on this... Older, more established schools like MSU, OSU, KCU, Des Moines, Kirksville, etc. with large alumni networks, lots of research funding, or support from their state might have somewhat better rates in this regard than newer schools, but it doesn't matter a whole lot.
 

IslandStyle808

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Not really no. All the number shows is where people match on their rank list, and the percent that match in their top 3 is in the 90%+ range or something like that. It tells you nothing about if someone actually wants field x but aren't competetive, or really wanted to go to programs x, y, or z but none of those programs extended an interview.
Or made location their top priority over program quality.
 

Lexdiamondz

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Not really no. All the number shows is where people match on their rank list, and the percent that match in their top 3 is in the 90%+ range or something like that. It tells you nothing about if someone actually wants field x but aren't competetive, or really wanted to go to programs x, y, or z but none of those programs extended an interview.
...which is why it's important to look at trends over several years. I agree that 1 data point is useless, even a handful are useless. But if there's a multiyear trend of large numbers of people not matching in their top 3 choices in a match algorithm that is applicant-preference driven in the first place, it says a lot about the types of opportunities available to, and the general perceptions of students from that institution.

Idk. My school and similarly-ranked institutions were incredibly anal about this type of data and tracked it relentlessly (never made it available to people outside of our institution however) so maybe I am biased.
 

AnatomyGrey12

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...which is why it's important to look at trends over several years. I agree that 1 data point is useless, even a handful are useless. But if there's a multiyear trend of large numbers of people not matching in their top 3 choices in a match algorithm that is applicant-preference driven in the first place, it says a lot about the types of opportunities available to, and the general perceptions of students from that institution.

Idk. My school and similarly-ranked institutions were incredibly anal about this type of data and tracked it relentlessly (never made it available to people outside of our institution however) so maybe I am biased.
The issue is that number is always high. I have never seen a "percent matching their top 3" statistic that was ever below 90%. That doesn't tell you anything. You and I have different opinions on match data, so we will agree to disagree.
 
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cliquesh

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I think most people end up high on their rank list. I matched my #2 for residency and #1 for fellowship. I think most of my classmates had similar outcomes. However, if a program doesn't invite you, you cannot rank them, so does it really say much if you matched your #1 out of a bunch of bad programs? I used to be obsessed with this stuff a few years ago (I need high board scores, I need to go to the "best" residency, I need to go to the "best" fellowship, etc.", but more recently I've come to the conclusion that it doesn't matter so much. If you're decent everything seems to work out fine.
 
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AlteredScale

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DO schools barely post their actual match rate because it fluctuates from low 80s to low 90s. Most will post "100% placement rate" on their news feed which is after the residency applicants who went unmatched had a chance to SOAP and scramble for positions.


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