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Do you need CPR cert to get ACLS cert.?

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Khalid, Jun 21, 2002.

  1. Khalid

    Khalid Junior Member

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    3 days to go until ACLS class!

    However, they are asking me to bring my CPR certification to regisration. Do I need it as a prerequisite for ACLS?
     
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  3. tussy

    tussy Senior Member

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    Yes, you need to have up to date certification of your basic life support in order to take the ACLS class. When i did ACLS last year they did the BLS recertification the first morning before we started the ACLS.
     
  4. NuMD97

    NuMD97 Senior Member

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    As I understand it: CPR is the community version, BLS being for the health care professional. I'm not sure they are accepted as interchangeable. But you do need the BLS to be ACLS-certified.
     
  5. prwunecom

    prwunecom Senior Member

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    yes, theoretically you are supposed to have a current BLS before you can get your ACLS. However if you don't have it this does not preclude you from taking ACLS. This happened to me as my BLS had expired, but I was still allowed to take the ACLS class. However, I have to make up the BLS class at some point. I was also told that I couldn't get my ACLS card until I showed proof of renewing my basic CPR, however they gave it to me anyway. Of course I will renew my basic CPR, but at least now I don't have the time rush to think about before clinical rotations start in August.
     
  6. silvercholla

    silvercholla Smarter than the avg bear

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    It depends on the state you are in. In NYC, if you are taking a BLS course then some classes include it. But as far as I know you need to be pre certified in CPR before you enter the class. And they perfer the AHA certification over red cross. So I would call them up and find out if you have to have it before the class starts or if you can take it somewhere else while you are taking the ACLS course or if they offer it in conjunction with the course you are about to take. Good Luck <img border="0" alt="[Clappy]" title="" src="graemlins/clappy.gif" />
     
  7. NuMD97

    NuMD97 Senior Member

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    I have a question for those of you who just took the ACLS course: Was your written exam an open book test? We were informed that the new version of ACLS allowed for an open book format, no matter where you took the course. Was this true for you folks as well? I'm just curious, because frankly I found that very strange.
     
  8. gg

    gg Member

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    at the hospital where i took it we were not allowed to have the acls book during the test but we were allowed to use the 2000 handbook of emergency cardiovascular care for healthcare providers (which basically has everything you need to know during various codes).
     
  9. NuMD97

    NuMD97 Senior Member

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    Interesting, gg. Seems like it's one and the same though, if it has all the algorithms and drugs. Wouldn't matter if it weren't the AHA handbook.
     
  10. gg

    gg Member

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    ok, the book they did not allow to use is titled: aha acls provider manual
    the handbook they allowed is titled:
    aha 2000 handbook of emergency cardiovascular care

    the acls provider manual is more in depth book or like it's called a manual. the handbook summarizes all that you practically might need to know during various scenarios (it does list drug dosages, provides code algorithms, it even includes the pediatric portion of the acls which is a separate course - pals)
     
  11. tussy

    tussy Senior Member

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    I can't believe that they let you guys use your handbook during the exam!!! In a real code situation you really do not have time to look up algorithms or drug dosages. You have to know them all cold.

    For dosages in a real code situation, you always just ask for an "amp". Most code drugs come in pre-measured syringes that are the common dosage that you might need. Eg. epi comes as 1mg, atropine is 1 mg, lidocaine comes as 100mg (1 mg/kg is the usual dosage), etc. Makes life a lot easier when the heat is on!
     
  12. gg

    gg Member

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    while i agree that you should know everything flat out cold, i would rather consult the handbook for say maintenance dosages of certain drugs than try to remember it all and/or get it worng.
     
  13. NuMD97

    NuMD97 Senior Member

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    I agree with everything you say, Tussy. It's a worrisome trend. No wonder they reassured us the first day that "no one fails ACLS anymore." The fault I think lies in the fact that the course (at least the version I just took) is merely two days in length and the manual is given out on the first day, with basic mastery to be accomplished by the close of the next day. Considering that they revamped quite a bit of it since the last time I certified, it was a daunting challenge. (And why on earth did they remove the rhythm strips?? What the heck were they thinking?) Frankly, I would much prefer that they expand the course by at least two more days to give one the opportunity to absorb it all.

    And you are absolutely right: that in a code situation, there are no crib notes. But I like what a previous poster noted: that once passed, they do practice code algorithms amongst themselves during the course of the year.

    In my hospital they expect the PGY-2's to be able to run the codes (which I believe is not the norm in most institutions), and in such circumstances an open book format does not help at all.
     

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