PELE#10

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2005
99
0
Status
Just wanted to get some advice from those that may have been in this position. I still have yet to take step 2. Is there still a chance to match if I apply everywhere? I am also an IMG which i have heard makes it so much harder.

Any advice would really be appreciated.
 

bustbones26

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2003
981
47
43
Visit site
Status
Attending Physician
I've said it before, and I'll say it again-----

IMG or poor academic performance only means that you probably will not match at nationally recognized neurology programs.

The other thing that could stop you from matching into a mediocre neurology program is if you didn't have a pulse.
 
About the Ads

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
Just wanted to get some advice from those that may have been in this position. I still have yet to take step 2. Is there still a chance to match if I apply everywhere? I am also an IMG which i have heard makes it so much harder.
Yes, you probably could match SOMEWHERE, but please make sure this is what you really want. Weren't you just asking the same questions in the OB/GYN, IM, FP, etc. forums? You should decide on a specialty FIRST, then figure out how to find a spot if you don't match. What if you end up in a specialty you hate? Do you really want to spend the rest of your life doing something you dislike? :rolleyes:
 
OP
P

PELE#10

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2005
99
0
Status
PainDr said:
Yes, you probably could match SOMEWHERE, but please make sure this is what you really want. Weren't you just asking the same questions in the OB/GYN, IM, FP, etc. forums? You should decide on a specialty FIRST, then figure out how to find a spot if you don't match. What if you end up in a specialty you hate? Do you really want to spend the rest of your life doing something you dislike? :rolleyes:
Thanks for the advice. The purpose of my post's is so that I "Make Sure" that I go into the field I really want...
So thanks again for the advice Dad...
lol
 
C

confusedfmg

okay...now if someone is intersted in neuro...and he wants to make sure he does neuro and for that he also applies in combined programs...like PMR- neuro and IM-neuro..besides applying in neuro itself....is that a negative point too.
 

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
okay...now if someone is intersted in neuro...and he wants to make sure he does neuro and for that he also applies in combined programs...like PMR- neuro and IM-neuro..besides applying in neuro itself....is that a negative point too.
Of course not. That is an entirely acceptable plan. My point with the other poster was that, based on other very recent posts, he/she obviously has no particular interest in neurology, or any other specialty for that matter, and is only interested in matching into SOME residency SOMEWHERE, which is a recipe for disaster, both personally and professionally. However, if they're not interested in constructive advice, then there's not much anyone can do.
 
OP
P

PELE#10

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2005
99
0
Status
PainDr said:
Of course not. That is an entirely acceptable plan. My point with the other poster was that, based on other very recent posts, he/she obviously had no particular interest in neurology, or any other specialty for that matter, and is only interested in matching into SOME residency SOMEWHERE, which is a recipe for disaster, both personally and professionally. However, if they're not interested in constructive advice, then there's not much anyone can do.

Your acdvice was not constructive it was actually sarcastic. Who are you to fully know my intentions of my post? I am actually rotating in Neurology now and I love it. This is why I posted my post.

You seem to jump to conclusions rather quickly and make judgements based on those conclusions. Sounds like a personal problem. You should work on it...
 

kapMD/PhD

T-1 yr
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2005
140
3
PA
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Ok - so I have my heart set on neuro, president of SIGN, been to AAN, ect. I'm doing MD/PhD program so have a while to go still. Just got Step 1 scores back - what really is considered a decent "competitive score" for neuro? Does it help that I like research too and have publications?
 

Methyldopa

Pharmacopoeia
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
May 13, 2004
305
3
Status
kapMD/PhD said:
Ok - so I have my heart set on neuro, president of SIGN, been to AAN, ect. I'm doing MD/PhD program so have a while to go still. Just got Step 1 scores back - what really is considered a decent "competitive score" for neuro? Does it help that I like research too and have publications?

Many a people have asked such a question. But no one ever answers. A competitive score depends on what program you want to go to?

Research seems to help, at least from the amount of PhD's I met interviewing.
 

kapMD/PhD

T-1 yr
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2005
140
3
PA
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Methyldopa said:
Many a people have asked such a question. But no one ever answers. A competitive score depends on what program you want to go to?

Research seems to help, at least from the amount of PhD's I met interviewing.
Well, it's kinda a little way off for me, but it's kinda a game anyway because my husband will be wanting to do a fellowship in Med/Peds cardiology at the same time that I start residency, so we need to find somewhere that will want both of us (he's a genius). Right now the list includes Ohio State, Iowa, UNC, Duke, and Vanderbilt. This of course is subject to change. If you know anything about the competitiveness of these programs it would be appreciated. Thanks!
 
About the Ads

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
Ok - so I have my heart set on neuro, president of SIGN, been to AAN, ect. I'm doing MD/PhD program so have a while to go still. Just got Step 1 scores back - what really is considered a decent "competitive score" for neuro? Does it help that I like research too and have publications?
It's been a few years since I was involved in the application process, so I couldn't comment on what current thoughts are regarding competitive scores, however, as the previous poster noted, it does depend on which programs you're applying to. Also, as others have noted, neurology is not a very competitive specialty. The fact that you are genuinely interested in research and have proven that by getting your MD/PhD would, in my opinion, be viewed as a real advantage. You are obviously very interested in the field...president of SIGN, already been to the annual meeting...interviewers will love you. :love:

With an MD/PhD, as well as your extracurriculars, you should shoot for the upper tier schools, but apply widely, just to cover your bases. Once you start getting interview invitations, you'll have a better idea of where you stand. You should be fine. :thumbup:

Your acdvice was not constructive it was actually sarcastic. Who are you to fully know my intentions of my post? I am actually rotating in Neurology now and I love it. This is why I posted my post.
You are correct. My comments were sarcastic, but so were yours...so what? :rolleyes: Who am I to know your true intentions? All I know is what you have posted, in this and OTHER threads/forums. Perhaps you should reread all your previous posts. You've made your intentions very clear. So now you say you're doing a neuro rotation...how convenient. Would you care to say where? I suspect you won't. :p

You seem to jump to conclusions rather quickly and make judgements based on those conclusions. Sounds like a personal problem. You should work on it...
Personal attacks aside, I am only responding to the information YOU have posted. As someone who, apparently, couldn't get into a US school and as you have stated, barely passed your boards, perhaps you should consider a less "cerebral" specialty. I could be wrong, but I honestly don't think you'd be happy in neurology.

BTW, I am not bashing carribbean schools. I know several people who, for whatever reason, could not get into a US school. However, they were able to overcome their personal issues and obtain good board scores. You must know that being from a carribbean school is a disadvantage. The best way of overcoming that disadvantage is by obtaining superior boards scores. It's not too late though. You could put all of your energy into obtaining a better step II score.
 

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
Well, it's kinda a little way off for me, but it's kinda a game anyway because my husband will be wanting to do a fellowship in Med/Peds cardiology at the same time that I start residency, so we need to find somewhere that will want both of us (he's a genius). Right now the list includes Ohio State, Iowa, UNC, Duke, and Vanderbilt. This of course is subject to change. If you know anything about the competitiveness of these programs it would be appreciated. Thanks!
Iowa has a great program (fairly competitive) and I think Duke is supposed to be pretty good, but I don't know much about the others. None of them are really top tier though. I suspect they've all been discussed at various times. Try doing a few searches...you should be able to find some program specific info. Also, there are other posters with much more recent experience. Perhaps some of them will chime in.
 

Nerdoscience

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2006
372
1
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Someone a year or two ago posted a list of programs listed by reputation. It was definitely not complete, and it wasn't completely accurate, but it gives an idea. If anyone can link back to it, please do.
 

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
okay...now if someone is intersted in neuro...and he wants to make sure he does neuro and for that he also applies in combined programs...like PMR- neuro and IM-neuro..besides applying in neuro itself....is that a negative point too.
I've thought about this post and wanted to revisit the issue. I really don't think it's necessary to apply to the combined programs unless you have a particular interest in the other specialty. Very few people don't match and of those who don't, most can scramble for a spot. If you do have some interest in the other field, then by all means, go for the combined programs. As a pain physician, I sometimes wish I had pursued a combined neuro/PM&R program. However, if you're just worried about matching, I don't think it's necessary. If you have already applied to the combined programs and accept interview invites, be prepared to explain why you are interested in the other field.
 

Faebinder

Slow Wave Smurf
10+ Year Member
May 24, 2006
3,507
10
Pennsylvania
Status
Attending Physician
My understanding is that combined programs are VERY hard to get into (besides the fact that they are rare). The frustration in neuro applications which is also a second deterrent for the average aplicant is that neuro programs don't always provide the intern year.. you have to go hunt for it. Sometimes it is harder to get that intern year than it is to get into the neuro program.
 

bustbones26

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2003
981
47
43
Visit site
Status
Attending Physician
Why does every person who scores less than 90th percentile or does not get recognized for scoring above the national average on their board exams think they will never match into residency? Especially Neurology!! Come on! There's more to the picture than this!
 

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
My understanding is that combined programs are VERY hard to get into (besides the fact that they are rare). The frustration in neuro applications which is also a second deterrent for the average aplicant is that neuro programs don't always provide the intern year.. you have to go hunt for it. Sometimes it is harder to get that intern year than it is to get into the neuro program.
I'm not sure this is really true. It may just be rumor. I know the number of combined spots is very limited, but the vast majority of people aren't interested in these programs. I could be wrong, but I can't imagine them being that competitive. Anyone have first hand experience?

Why does every person who scores less than 90th percentile or does not get recognized for scoring above the national average on their board exams think they will never match into residency? Especially Neurology!! Come on! There's more to the picture than this!
I couldn't agree more!
 
C

confusedfmg

well he field im interesed in is neurology...i love it...but i might also be interested in a pain fellowship afterwards....do u think a combined fellowship would serve me better....and as to what u said about being ready with an answer to why u applied in the other speciality...which should be appropriate
 

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
As to questions about combined programs, you're really the only one who can answer. You'll have to decide why the other specialty would be useful. If you're interested in pain and are asking about the combined neuro/PM&R programs, the answer is obvious, or should be. If not, you should spend some time learning about comprehensive pain management. You could even start by spending some time in the pain forum...lots of useful info there. If you're considering other combined programs, I'm not the best person to help you.

I think a combined neuro/PM&R residency would be helpful, but not necessary, for someone going into pain. The most important thing is fellowship training. I just completed my fellowship and was fortunate to train at a top program that has a committment to multidisciplinary training. They have a multidisciplinary faculty and always choose a multidisciplinary group of fellows. I think they're fairly ahead of their time, which is why they were my top choice. :D
 

kapMD/PhD

T-1 yr
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2005
140
3
PA
Status
Resident [Any Field]

Nerdoscience

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2006
372
1
Status
Fellow [Any Field]

PainDr

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2003
470
1
Visit site
Status
I would take that list with a grain of salt. No one would argue with the top tier, but the bottem list is very much a matter of opinion. I would never put the Barrow (#50) so far down the list. Of course, they are primarily known for neurosurgery (top tier for neurosurgery), but I'd bet they have a great neuro program. On the other hand, LSU shouldn't even be on the list. Also, I would certainly rank Iowa higher than 48, more like top 20 or 30. Additionally, program rankings will change with time. For example, UT Southwestern used to have a pretty good program, but lost their chairman to U of Kansas, which is now a great program and isn't even on the list.
 

neuroguy1

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 1, 2006
10
0
Status
so how about if someone has got roundabout 219 in step 1 n 2...hes definitely not going for top tier but which programs can u say hed be good to go for..considering hes an fmg
 

Nerdoscience

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2006
372
1
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Maybe some people can give you a better idea, but it's so unpredictable. I matters so much on so many other factors. Do you have US clinical experience? Do you have recent clinical experience? How are your letters? Do you know anyone in any programs? Are the programs more friendly toward FMGs? How well do you interview? How is your English? Do you do research?

The list goes on.
 
About the Ads