DocVapor

Big Schwartz
Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 4, 2012
2,494
4,629
Combing the desert
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Resident [Any Field]
Wondering how many ****s I should give. Currently giving like 3.
Personally I'm giving ****s in my intended specialty and those close to it, and then sort of giving ****s for all others until match day, then giving exactly zero ****s.
 

Chemdude

10+ Year Member
Oct 8, 2008
1,648
159
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Resident [Any Field]
I have been on a "research" rotation for the the past 6 weeks. I'm planning on putting in the least amount of effort possible in every rotation. I was originally scheduled to take my medicine AI in October, but I want to delay it so I could be relaxed during interview time. The only downside to all of this is that I feel like I'm getting dumber at an exponential rate; I have forgotten 90% of what I used to know...I'm loving it. Medical school can suck my ****
 
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Porfirio

7+ Year Member
May 27, 2011
462
236
Status
Medical Student
EM requires SLOEs, so I am giving 10/10 ****s. Next month is a different story.
 

DrOwnage

7+ Year Member
Oct 12, 2011
197
183
Los Angeles
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Resident [Any Field]
MS4 here. Took Step 2 already, did my AI, finished a rotation of intended specialty (anesthesia), highly competitive for said specialty, got 2 solid anesthesia letters of rec. I find myself guilty sometimes around attendings on my rotations because I would rather just shadow and chill at this point then do all the work/notes. No grades involved. I should probably start writing my personal statement... So I guess currently giving one **** which is my residency application. I hope attendings realize that MS4s are mostly burned out waiting to match, but I could be wrong.
 

operaman

10+ Year Member
Jun 7, 2010
2,037
4,985
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Resident [Any Field]
3-4 s--ts sounds about right. Primarily it's about securing a residency position and doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Beyond that you have to hit your requirements to graduate, so make sure you know what those are and that your schedule is going to be adequate. Otherwise, tailor your schedule and elective rotations to maximize things you care about and time to relax. I found dermatology and radiology to be great choices for both and also did some extra ICU rotations as I felt critical care was a big weakness of mine and I wanted to get comfortable with more procedures. The beauty of it all is that after your app is submitted, nobody is going to see your grades until your new PD gets your transcript after graduation, so you need to give negative-s**ts about grades and the sort of game playing that we all did during 3rd year.
 

ChrisMack390

2+ Year Member
Jan 15, 2015
3,379
4,520
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Medical Student (Accepted)
Isn't 4th year when you need to gather up LORs for your residency apps? Seems like you'd want to try hard.
 

mimelim

Vascular Surgery
7+ Year Member
Sep 19, 2011
4,878
14,368
Status
Attending Physician
Got 2 from my first rotation 4th year. So I'm done in that regard.

Applying IM, so other than my subi I don't give any ****s anymore.
If you are set for your application cycle, then what you do the rest of the year is largely irrelevant toward residency.

I encourage our MS4s to do interesting rotations about things that they won't have a chance to see once they hit residency or things that they think might be useful peripherally. For example, there is no excuse for a 4th year medical student to not be able to read basic chest and abdominal xrays. One month reading films on either an elective or established radiology rotation will help, a lot. There is no substitute for reading a couple hundred xrays consecutively either with a rads resident or attending. I also tell people going into vascular surgery to do cardiology, general IM, nephrology, pulmonology, etc. if they have a chance and the rotations have reasonable reviews. 4th year you have few expectations and even less responsibility. It is a golden opportunity to actually learn some practical medicine.
 

Slack3r

Sicker than your average
10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2008
2,865
1,410
If you are set for your application cycle, then what you do the rest of the year is largely irrelevant toward residency.

I encourage our MS4s to do interesting rotations about things that they won't have a chance to see once they hit residency or things that they think might be useful peripherally. For example, there is no excuse for a 4th year medical student to not be able to read basic chest and abdominal xrays. One month reading films on either an elective or established radiology rotation will help, a lot. There is no substitute for reading a couple hundred xrays consecutively either with a rads resident or attending. I also tell people going into vascular surgery to do cardiology, general IM, nephrology, pulmonology, etc. if they have a chance and the rotations have reasonable reviews. 4th year you have few expectations and even less responsibility. It is a golden opportunity to actually learn some practical medicine.
There's really no reason radiology shouldn't be a required rotation. Unfortunately, that's not the case at most schools.
 
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Kaustikos

Archerize It
10+ Year Member
Jan 18, 2008
12,197
4,165
Always Bespin
There's really no reason radiology shouldn't be a required rotation. Unfortunately, that's not the case at most schools.
Agreed.
Having an idea of how to look at images before residency seems like a no brainer. At least be comfortable with X-ray's and CT.
Also, I'm biased, but learning what imaging protocol to order/being okay to call radiology for help.
 

MilkIsGood

10+ Year Member
Nov 14, 2008
1,052
126
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Resident [Any Field]
That's end of third year. If you are taking it more than a month or two into 4th year you're doing it wrong.
you have no freaking idea what you're talking about. anyone doing a specialty that pretty much requires 1-2 away rotations havent taken step 2. derm, ent, plastics, uro, rad onc. all these applicants in competitive specialties must be doing it wrong..
 
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