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Does it matter who interviews you?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Woots32, Sep 24, 2002.

  1. Woots32

    Woots32 kinda funky, kinda fine
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    I've gone on one interview already and have a few more lined up, and I was just wondering - should you read anything into who conducts your interview? At my last one I had a dean of student affairs, and for my interview on Fri. i have a dean of admissions. Is this significant, or do they just randomly assign people based on how the time slots fall?

    Also, for those of you out there who have interviewed - what kind of things do you put in your thank-you notes?
     
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  3. dpark74

    dpark74 Senior Member
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    From what I've heard, all interviews (no matter who conducts them) are viewed as another recommendation to the adcom. Treat each one as if it is vital, as they always are. So, it does not really matter who interviews you, because the entire committee decides...not just one person.

    Congrats on your invites BTW.:)
     
  4. CANES2006

    CANES2006 Miami chica
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    A little off topic here, but I noticed last year that when I interviewed with a woman I had a much tougher interview. The interviews with the men were a whole heck of alot easier. The women interviewers were really cold and unreceptive. I felt like saying: Please don't hate me because I'm beautiful. :p ;) All kidding aside. Have any of you girls out there experienced the same thing?
     
  5. Woots32

    Woots32 kinda funky, kinda fine
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    Well, from the one interview I had at U Mich, the two women were very talkative and friendly. The interviews were very conversational, and I actually spent close to half of the time with one of the two women answering my questions about the school, and with the other we mostly talked about pets and books we'd read. The third was a male doctor who grilled me on my research and asked a lot harder questions. But he nodded and smiled a lot, so maybe he just wanted to see how I handled the pressure - I don't know. Anyone else got thoughts?
     
  6. Wardens

    Wardens Long arm of the law
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    I'm a guy, and while I haven't applied to medical school yet, I've always found that interviews with women were a lot more laid back. You have the chance to smile a lot more and work that charm. ;)
     
  7. Tweetie_bird

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    I agree with Wardens.

    I'm female (duh!) and I've noticed how men are much, much more receptive toward me in any job situation/field/research professional setting. I always feel a slight advantage when I am interviewing or working with a male. On the other hand, I've noticed some tough competition for attention, weird vibes etc when I've worked with a few women.

    I can't explain this, but I have noticed it too. Weird, huh? Perhaps the men that we interview with might feel like they shouldn't be too _________ (fill in the blanks) because women might construe it the wrong way? I don't know. Also, I've noticed how when I apply make up and look really nice at work, people listen to me much more than when I may have a pony tail and jeans. Know what I mean? In other words, when I am looking presentable/nice in a professional setting, I have to speak less words and be less assertive and still get my way. Just a pattern I've noticed.

    On a tangent--my fiance and I went to buy some second hand furniture for the appartment and the weirdest thing happened. As we got out of the car, I told my fiance "if it's a guy, let me do the talking. If it's a girl, I'll let you handle it." And anyway, so when we went in there, it was a guy, I DID do the talking, and we got the furniture MUCH MUCH cheaper than we would have. I have a feeling it has a bit to do with gender bias and also a bit to do with personality. Right?
     
  8. agent

    agent agent, RN
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    interviews with the opposite sex in general are usually much easier
     
  9. Tweetie_bird

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    oh, I forgot to add what I had learned in one of my Psych classes.

    Apprently, there is a trend (note: there ARE exceptions) that psychologists have noticed in really successful women. They noticed that those women who spoke in a lower tone of voice and didn't put ??? at the end of their sentences, also those women that wore less make up and "acted" more "boyish" seemed to do better than their more aesthetically feminine counterparts. Please don't flame me for this, i really did hear my prof lecture on this once. We also learned a bit about womens' hand gestures..like the way they hold their hands, etc seems to dictate how other people are receptive toward them in a professional setting. Weird stuff, I know.

    I have seen exceptions to this though--I know lots of really pretty lady docs who carry themselves like a dainty little doll. They are successful, I just wonder how long it takes them to dress up each morning. Then I've seen really boyish women who are not as high up on the socio-economic ladder. Anyway, I'm just rambling.

    I wonder if there are similar trends in men. :confused:
     
  10. Resident Alien

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    I gotta agree with Canes here, I had my fears with those women interviewers.....seems women are better at putting you on the spot and scanning for trembles than men.
     
  11. CRAZYTERP

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    This is a lil off topic as well, but does anyone know what the etiquette is regarding asking questions of ones chances following an interview? Is that just a huge no no? I would assume so, but I feel like we must all be like, how did I do? when the interview ends? Juts wondering. thanks
     
  12. dpark74

    dpark74 Senior Member
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    I think it can only be bad to ask how you did after the interview. They may think, "Weren't you here the last half hour?" Also, it may come off as being not confident.

    But I understand your point...but we must resist the urge to ask.
     
  13. Woots32

    Woots32 kinda funky, kinda fine
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    At my U Mich interview, the first woman to interview me asked me if I wanted to know what she thought about me and how the interview went. After a few seconds of looking like a goldfish, I said sure. (Who wouldn't?) She told me she thought I would make an excellent doctor and would do very well at med school/Michigan. :clap:

    That has to be a good sign, right? Should I have turned her down? Has this happened to anyone else? (I'm stil amazed by the amount of indecisiveness and insecurity that comes w/ this whole process!)
     
  14. dpark74

    dpark74 Senior Member
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    Your situation is the flip side of what we were talking about. I think in your case it would only be natural to know what they thought since it means that you value their opinion...but the key thing here is that she offered her opinion without you asking for one.

    They definitely want you at their school...congrats in advance!:clap:
     
  15. CRAZYTERP

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    Congrats Woots!!! I second Dpark and think you should be overjoyed. I cannot think of anyone in that situation who not be able to say yes to that question.
     
  16. Woots32

    Woots32 kinda funky, kinda fine
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    Thanks, guys! :D
     

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