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Dominican University Post-Bacc Pre-Med Program

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2inspireU

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I am strictly writing this information in the hopes that it will be invaluable to some other student considering attending this program. I sincerely hope that I may spare others the heartache, disappointment, financial trouble, and waste of time and energy involved with being a student in this post-bacc program. I am highly annoyed that the AMCAS website does not allow people to leave comments about these post-bacc programs because I am sure many would have been spared a lot of headaches. Therefore, I am giving you my personal in-depth review.

Dominican University is a private Catholic institution, but you do not have to be Catholic to attend and the school tries to foster a welcoming environment to all students(LBGT, ethnic minorities, atheists, etc). It is located in River Forest, IL, which is a wealthy western suburb of Chicago, IL.

Dr. Scannicchio is the post-bacc pre-med advisor and founder of the program at Dominican University. Dr. Wilson, whom should not be referred to as doctor really because his license has been suspended in Illinois since 1998 due to a medical case on Physician Assistant Suicide involving Henry Taylor, is the contact person for recommendations to DO programs for the post-bacc program. Dr. Hughes is another faculty member of the post-bacc pre-med program who interviews students for the program, and she teaches some a worthless class that is required for the program titled "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." I'll write more about this later to justify calling it worthless. However, I will first start with Dr. Scannicchio as he is the head of this post-bacc program aka scam.

Dr. Scannicchio is a retired Dentist(Maxiofacial surgeon) whom is making bank off of the students enrolled at Dominican Univ post-bacc program. He owns Bon Villa, the apartment complex in Oak Park, IL, that all Dominican Univ post-bacc students are recommended to apply for housing. Dr. Scannicchio takes power points from the internet(you will find them all if you search for the topic on google that he uses) and uses them as his lectures during classes he teaches such as Advanced Anatomy w/ cadaver I & II, medical terminology, and Histology. Moreover, the TAs grade(these are other Dominican post-bacc students who are taking the class with you and are usually in the process of applying to med school...yes, this does create conflict because 1.)if you are really good friends with the student TA you don't have to work for the grade and 2.) if you are struggling in the class or have questions theTAs are hard to get in contact with because they are students to applying to med school, taking classes, and really don't know what is going on) and usually deals with all interactions with the students. Therefore, what does Dr. Scannicchio do if he doesn't have to prepare his lectures, since they are plagiarized, and the TAs actually do the grades and other class related menial work? That is a good question. When one goes in to be advised on what they should do, Dr. Scannicchio does not have your transcripts in hand, does not know you or your background, but will "advise" you on what classes you should take. In addition, if you are struggling in the program, trying to figure out what you should do, or you are questioning whether you should be a doctor or vet, etc. He says the same thing to all students that he speaks with. If you can't become a doctor be a nurse is always mentioned first. If nursing is too hard for you, then choose some other profession in the allied health care field. That is his advising in a gist. The acceptance rate into med school is very low from this program. Therefore, Dr. Scannicchio has now been trying really hard to push students to consider and apply to Caribbean medical schools instead of MD programs in the USA. He has even had representatives come in to speak with students about Caribbean MD programs. This is due to the fact that the standards for applying to a Caribbean MD program is significantly less than a MD program in the USA. Hence, more students would get accepted in Caribbean MD programs as opposed to MD programs in the USA, therefore inflating their MD acceptance rate. Therefore are a good amount of Dominican Univ post-bacc students currently at Caribbean MD programs because they could not get into MD programs in the USA, and they still had the desire to become get a MD.

Another issue with Dr. Scannicchio is that he is favors female students over male students. He favors female students over male students because he inappropriately touches female students, but no one will come forward with complaints against him because they are in fear of their chances of getting into medical school. Since, Dr. Scannicchio is the head of the post-bacc program, and the one who puts together your committee letter for medical school. This is very well known, and any student still considering applying here should come to campus, and ask students about Dr. Scannicchio touching female students. Everyone will have a story I guarantee you.

Dr. Wilson is mainly apart of this post-bacc program because they need someone to write recommendation letters for students who apply to DO schools. Dr. Wilson is the most unprofessional out of all them involved in this program. He is also the most hardest to get in contact with because he is hardly on campus, and also teaches courses at a local community college, Triton College, in River Grove, IL. The courses Dr. Wilson teaches at Dominican Univ is Advanced Pathophysiology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Internal Medicine. Dr. Wilson is very sexist. He has a collection on his macbook pro laptop with tons of old commercials that have banned from being shown in the US or has been removed from TV. Well, during class one day he just up and shows the class a commercial that has three women around a refrigerator. When they open the refrigerator and get a beer out all the ladies nipples where showing through their shirts. He also sent an email to all the people on the post-bacc mailing list a poem, in short, making light of date rape by saying women date rape men that is how they get men to marry them. He is very unprofessional along with being a lot of other words that end in -ist. Once Dr. Wilson showed in class pictures sent to him by a former Dominican Univ post-bacc student who did international volunteering in Africa. He showed the pictures of those ailing and dying people who had such gruesome conditions going on in a manner not to teach us about those ailments, but to get our reactions like it was some circus freak sideshow. He was showing the pictures like, "Look at this, eww" or "Man, aren't you glad you don't live there?" Dr. Wilson was once talking about a disease that largely affected a small tribe of Indians in Advanced Pathophysiology. He said, "Oh, who cares it only affects those tribe of Indians. Who cares about that tribe of Indians anyway?" Well, one of the students in our class happen to be of mixed heritages, and one of those heritages was that small tribe of Indians. Dr. Wilson said, "Really, you are Indian? Are you going to school for free?" The student replied, "No." Dr. Wilson replied,"Man, I would really look into that if I were you because you should be going to school for free." Dr. Wilson is able to get away with his language mainly because he is so funny, but even Dr. Hughes has said to our class, "Dr. Wilson walks a very fine line between being funny and really inappropriate." Well, that makes two of them.

Dr. Hughes is a Clinical Psychologist by trade, and she teaches a class that she has totally made up that has no structure to it called "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." It is a required class now for incoming post-bacc students, and she is working to make it a year long class. Basically it is a class that she uses to talk about herself, other students, Dr. Scannicchio, and topics that interests her. I'm dead serious too. Every class Dr. Hughes talks endlessly about her son RJ and daughter Rachel, how much money she has, and how easy it is for her a white woman. Also, how she has to be cognizant of the stereotypes of white women with blonde hair because she has faced a lot of discrimination. She will tell you countless stories of folks being surprised she has a PhD when they see her, etc. She is also very unprofessional too. That should be no surprise here. Dr. Hughes talks a lot and usually it is much to do about nothing. Dr. Hughes and Dr. Scannicchio's professional relationship appears highly inappropriate. Dr. Hughes would come into class and tell all of Dr. Scannicchio's personal business, and her business along with other students in the program business. It was almost as if the class served as a catharsis for her. Her class discussed topics such as internet porn addiction, sexual abuse, transgender vs. transsexual, test anxiety, and many more random behavioral topics. She also did med school interview and patient interview simulations. The patient interview simulation is the meat and potatoes of her class. It is where students dress up as their role that was randomly selected, and interview actors who play their patient(the majority are theater students at Concordia Univ in River Forest, IL which is down the street from Dominican Univ). The student will either be the doctor, nurse or med student. Again, no one complains because Dr. Hughes is funny, and it is an easy "A." To take classes as a post-bacc at Dominican is $600 per course, it may be higher now. At $600 a course I am sure you would be angry to take a worthless class such as this one.

Things that were good about the program...

1.) The internship at Rush Hospital in Oak Park, IL where Dr. Scannicchio has worked for years and retired from. He has a lot of contacts up there, so students are able to intern in different departments. Not just medicine, but dental, pharmacy, etc. I did my internship in surgery with Dr. Nash(general surgeon) whom lets post-bacc students scrub in for surgeries to observe and learn about different surgical cases.

2.)In Advance Anatomy you will work with two cadavers, one male and one female. Usually you will only get to work with a cadaver in medical school.

3.) Dr. Scannicchio has recently started up an internship in Histology at Rush Hospital at their main location in Chicago, IL. The new futuristic, green, wierd looking building near the expressway. This allows post-bacc students access to view culture samples with doctors, residents, etc.


I hope you will think long and hard before enrolling into Dominican post-bacc program. If you would like to know more just send me a message.
 

mbernard

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I am strictly writing this information in the hopes that it will be invaluable to some other student considering attending this program. I sincerely hope that I may spare others the heartache, disappointment, financial trouble, and waste of time and energy involved with being a student in this post-bacc program. I am highly annoyed that the AMCAS website does not allow people to leave comments about these post-bacc programs because I am sure many would have been spared a lot of headaches. Therefore, I am giving you my personal in-depth review.

Dominican University is a private Catholic institution, but you do not have to be Catholic to attend and the school tries to foster a welcoming environment to all students(LBGT, ethnic minorities, atheists, etc). It is located in River Forest, IL, which is a wealthy western suburb of Chicago, IL.

Dr. Scannicchio is the post-bacc pre-med advisor and founder of the program at Dominican University. Dr. Wilson, whom should not be referred to as doctor really because his license has been suspended in Illinois since 1998 due to a medical case on Physician Assistant Suicide involving Henry Taylor, is the contact person for recommendations to DO programs for the post-bacc program. Dr. Hughes is another faculty member of the post-bacc pre-med program who interviews students for the program, and she teaches some a worthless class that is required for the program titled "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." I'll write more about this later to justify calling it worthless. However, I will first start with Dr. Scannicchio as he is the head of this post-bacc program aka scam.

Dr. Scannicchio is a retired Dentist(Maxiofacial surgeon) whom is making bank off of the students enrolled at Dominican Univ post-bacc program. He owns Bon Villa, the apartment complex in Oak Park, IL, that all Dominican Univ post-bacc students are recommended to apply for housing. Dr. Scannicchio takes power points from the internet(you will find them all if you search for the topic on google that he uses) and uses them as his lectures during classes he teaches such as Advanced Anatomy w/ cadaver I & II, medical terminology, and Histology. Moreover, the TAs grade(these are other Dominican post-bacc students who are taking the class with you and are usually in the process of applying to med school...yes, this does create conflict because 1.)if you are really good friends with the student TA you don't have to work for the grade and 2.) if you are struggling in the class or have questions theTAs are hard to get in contact with because they are students to applying to med school, taking classes, and really don't know what is going on) and usually deals with all interactions with the students. Therefore, what does Dr. Scannicchio do if he doesn't have to prepare his lectures, since they are plagiarized, and the TAs actually do the grades and other class related menial work? That is a good question. When one goes in to be advised on what they should do, Dr. Scannicchio does not have your transcripts in hand, does not know you or your background, but will "advise" you on what classes you should take. In addition, if you are struggling in the program, trying to figure out what you should do, or you are questioning whether you should be a doctor or vet, etc. He says the same thing to all students that he speaks with. If you can't become a doctor be a nurse is always mentioned first. If nursing is too hard for you, then choose some other profession in the allied health care field. That is his advising in a gist. The acceptance rate into med school is very low from this program. Therefore, Dr. Scannicchio has now been trying really hard to push students to consider and apply to Caribbean medical schools instead of MD programs in the USA. He has even had representatives come in to speak with students about Caribbean MD programs. This is due to the fact that the standards for applying to a Caribbean MD program is significantly less than a MD program in the USA. Hence, more students would get accepted in Caribbean MD programs as opposed to MD programs in the USA, therefore inflating their MD acceptance rate. Therefore are a good amount of Dominican Univ post-bacc students currently at Caribbean MD programs because they could not get into MD programs in the USA, and they still had the desire to become get a MD.

Another issue with Dr. Scannicchio is that he is favors female students over male students. He favors female students over male students because he inappropriately touches female students, but no one will come forward with complaints against him because they are in fear of their chances of getting into medical school. Since, Dr. Scannicchio is the head of the post-bacc program, and the one who puts together your committee letter for medical school. This is very well known, and any student still considering applying here should come to campus, and ask students about Dr. Scannicchio touching female students. Everyone will have a story I guarantee you.

Dr. Wilson is mainly apart of this post-bacc program because they need someone to write recommendation letters for students who apply to DO schools. Dr. Wilson is the most unprofessional out of all them involved in this program. He is also the most hardest to get in contact with because he is hardly on campus, and also teaches courses at a local community college, Triton College, in River Grove, IL. The courses Dr. Wilson teaches at Dominican Univ is Advanced Pathophysiology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Internal Medicine. Dr. Wilson is very sexist. He has a collection on his macbook pro laptop with tons of old commercials that have banned from being shown in the US or has been removed from TV. Well, during class one day he just up and shows the class a commercial that has three women around a refrigerator. When they open the refrigerator and get a beer out all the ladies nipples where showing through their shirts. He also sent an email to all the people on the post-bacc mailing list a poem, in short, making light of date rape by saying women date rape men that is how they get men to marry them. He is very unprofessional along with being a lot of other words that end in -ist. Once Dr. Wilson showed in class pictures sent to him by a former Dominican Univ post-bacc student who did international volunteering in Africa. He showed the pictures of those ailing and dying people who had such gruesome conditions going on in a manner not to teach us about those ailments, but to get our reactions like it was some circus freak sideshow. He was showing the pictures like, "Look at this, eww" or "Man, aren't you glad you don't live there?" Dr. Wilson was once talking about a disease that largely affected a small tribe of Indians in Advanced Pathophysiology. He said, "Oh, who cares it only affects those tribe of Indians. Who cares about that tribe of Indians anyway?" Well, one of the students in our class happen to be of mixed heritages, and one of those heritages was that small tribe of Indians. Dr. Wilson said, "Really, you are Indian? Are you going to school for free?" The student replied, "No." Dr. Wilson replied,"Man, I would really look into that if I were you because you should be going to school for free." Dr. Wilson is able to get away with his language mainly because he is so funny, but even Dr. Hughes has said to our class, "Dr. Wilson walks a very fine line between being funny and really inappropriate." Well, that makes two of them.

Dr. Hughes is a Clinical Psychologist by trade, and she teaches a class that she has totally made up that has no structure to it called "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." It is a required class now for incoming post-bacc students, and she is working to make it a year long class. Basically it is a class that she uses to talk about herself, other students, Dr. Scannicchio, and topics that interests her. I'm dead serious too. Every class Dr. Hughes talks endlessly about her son RJ and daughter Rachel, how much money she has, and how easy it is for her a white woman. Also, how she has to be cognizant of the stereotypes of white women with blonde hair because she has faced a lot of discrimination. She will tell you countless stories of folks being surprised she has a PhD when they see her, etc. She is also very unprofessional too. That should be no surprise here. Dr. Hughes talks a lot and usually it is much to do about nothing. Dr. Hughes and Dr. Scannicchio's professional relationship appears highly inappropriate. Dr. Hughes would come into class and tell all of Dr. Scannicchio's personal business, and her business along with other students in the program business. It was almost as if the class served as a catharsis for her. Her class discussed topics such as internet porn addiction, sexual abuse, transgender vs. transsexual, test anxiety, and many more random behavioral topics. She also did med school interview and patient interview simulations. The patient interview simulation is the meat and potatoes of her class. It is where students dress up as their role that was randomly selected, and interview actors who play their patient(the majority are theater students at Concordia Univ in River Forest, IL which is down the street from Dominican Univ). The student will either be the doctor, nurse or med student. Again, no one complains because Dr. Hughes is funny, and it is an easy "A." To take classes as a post-bacc at Dominican is $600 per course, it may be higher now. At $600 a course I am sure you would be angry to take a worthless class such as this one.

Things that were good about the program...

1.) The internship at Rush Hospital in Oak Park, IL where Dr. Scannicchio has worked for years and retired from. He has a lot of contacts up there, so students are able to intern in different departments. Not just medicine, but dental, pharmacy, etc. I did my internship in surgery with Dr. Nash(general surgeon) whom lets post-bacc students scrub in for surgeries to observe and learn about different surgical cases.

2.)In Advance Anatomy you will work with two cadavers, one male and one female. Usually you will only get to work with a cadaver in medical school.

3.) Dr. Scannicchio has recently started up an internship in Histology at Rush Hospital at their main location in Chicago, IL. The new futuristic, green, wierd looking building near the expressway. This allows post-bacc students access to view culture samples with doctors, residents, etc.


I hope you will think long and hard before enrolling into Dominican post-bacc program. If you would like to know more just send me a message.


Hey, I sent you a PM. I was hoping you could answer a few questions for me.
 

2inspireU

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Response to MBernard...


It is easy to get accepted into the program. Not as easy as when I applied in 2008 because back then Dr. Scannicchio was still practicing medicine and trying to run the post-bacc program. Now, that he has retired he is a little more involved and thus acceptances into the program are slightly harder. To give you an idea of what I mean by slightly harder. When I was accepted Dr. Scannicchio just gave me a verbal acceptance without having looked at my transcripts and basically application. When I came in to speak with him he said, "yeah, you are accepted" then looked at my transcripts. I kid you not. Now, they will look at your application, but Dr. Scannicchio is still very lenient in acceptances because he is making a ton of money for both him and the school. I think it has been estimated that he brings in about $2million to the Dominican each year with the post-bacc program.

The students are all from diverse backgrounds. You have students who attended prestigious undergrad institutions where they either goofed off while there or the classes were too hard for them there. You have students with no science background at all, and then some students with science backgrounds and MCATs under their belts. There are a lot of gunners, and most of all cliques. If you do decide to attend Dominican Univ. allying yourself with a clique is the way to go because it makes your life easier. A clique is a group of students who help each other out. If you miss class, a friend is there to get info for you and give you everything. You don't want to attend those late seminars every Tuesday a friend(usually everyone rotates) will go and sign everyone's name. They also study together and help each other out with homework, etc.

Whether you will be successful in applying to medical school depends entirely upon you and your personality. This post-bacc program is huge because they want the money, and every year it is continually growing. Therefore, if you are an introvert you should not apply because it will be hard to get noticed by professors and Dr. Scannicchio. Another thing is that the professors at Dominican Univ. do not like the post-bacc students, and a group of students have raised concerns about possible discrimination against post-bacc students before. Professors at Dominican Univ. do not like post-bacc students because they have increased the sizes of their classes, the amount of work they have to do, and the amount of help they need with their classes. All the while, these professors pay has not increased. Before, the post-bacc program was started at Dominican Univ. their class size was very small around 10:1 because Dominican Univ. is a small private institution. However, with the growth of the post-bacc program class sizes now are 40:1 and growing. Therefore, Dominican Univ. is not a post-bacc student friendly campus. Even undergrads tend not to like post-bacc students because they feel post-bacc students make the classes harder because they already have some background knowledge of the material a lot of times, so the professor has to make the material harder as a result.

As far as reputation of the program, it is bad. I spoke to a professor at Rosalind Franklin's medical school located in Northern Chicago, IL. I told him I was a post-bacc student at Dominican Univ. He replied, "You know that program is terrible right? They have a very poor medical school acceptance rate."


I will tell you something I wish someone would have told me at the beginning. You don't need to apply to post-bacc programs because they are made to make money. Take the classes you need or need to retake at your undergrad, and apply on your own. However, if you feel you need more support because you really have a lot of damage control to do, then you are infinitely better off applying to a regular master's program in a science related field and then applying to medical school. I would be careful with special master's programs because they are essentially fancy post-bacc programs, but a special master's program (you are awarded a master's) is a heck of a lot better than a post-bacc program where you only get a worthless certificate.
 

mbernard

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Response to MBernard...


It is easy to get accepted into the program. Not as easy as when I applied in 2008 because back then Dr. Scannicchio was still practicing medicine and trying to run the post-bacc program. Now, that he has retired he is a little more involved and thus acceptances into the program are slightly harder. To give you an idea of what I mean by slightly harder. When I was accepted Dr. Scannicchio just gave me a verbal acceptance without having looked at my transcripts and basically application. When I came in to speak with him he said, "yeah, you are accepted" then looked at my transcripts. I kid you not. Now, they will look at your application, but Dr. Scannicchio is still very lenient in acceptances because he is making a ton of money for both him and the school. I think it has been estimated that he brings in about $2million to the Dominican each year with the post-bacc program.

The students are all from diverse backgrounds. You have students who attended prestigious undergrad institutions where they either goofed off while there or the classes were too hard for them there. You have students with no science background at all, and then some students with science backgrounds and MCATs under their belts. There are a lot of gunners, and most of all cliques. If you do decide to attend Dominican Univ. allying yourself with a clique is the way to go because it makes your life easier. A clique is a group of students who help each other out. If you miss class, a friend is there to get info for you and give you everything. You don't want to attend those late seminars every Tuesday a friend(usually everyone rotates) will go and sign everyone's name. They also study together and help each other out with homework, etc.

Whether you will be successful in applying to medical school depends entirely upon you and your personality. This post-bacc program is huge because they want the money, and every year it is continually growing. Therefore, if you are an introvert you should not apply because it will be hard to get noticed by professors and Dr. Scannicchio. Another thing is that the professors at Dominican Univ. do not like the post-bacc students, and a group of students have raised concerns about possible discrimination against post-bacc students before. Professors at Dominican Univ. do not like post-bacc students because they have increased the sizes of their classes, the amount of work they have to do, and the amount of help they need with their classes. All the while, these professors pay has not increased. Before, the post-bacc program was started at Dominican Univ. their class size was very small around 10:1 because Dominican Univ. is a small private institution. However, with the growth of the post-bacc program class sizes now are 40:1 and growing. Therefore, Dominican Univ. is not a post-bacc student friendly campus. Even undergrads tend not to like post-bacc students because they feel post-bacc students make the classes harder because they already have some background knowledge of the material a lot of times, so the professor has to make the material harder as a result.

As far as reputation of the program, it is bad. I spoke to a professor at Rosalind Franklin's medical school located in Northern Chicago, IL. I told him I was a post-bacc student at Dominican Univ. He replied, "You know that program is terrible right? They have a very poor medical school acceptance rate."


I will tell you something I wish someone would have told me at the beginning. You don't need to apply to post-bacc programs because they are made to make money. Take the classes you need or need to retake at your undergrad, and apply on your own. However, if you feel you need more support because you really have a lot of damage control to do, then you are infinitely better off applying to a regular master's program in a science related field and then applying to medical school. I would be careful with special master's programs because they are essentially fancy post-bacc programs, but a special master's program (you are awarded a master's) is a heck of a lot better than a post-bacc program where you only get a worthless certificate.

Let me start by saying thank you for that information. It helps a lot in making my final decision about this program.

I do have a bit of an issue that I believe will limit my options, however. Unfortunately, I graduated with a BA in Psychology and don't have a legitimate science background. I have a few science credits, in intro bio, physics and intermediate bio but I did not complete the upper division bio's, intro chem, orgo chem I and II and the physics II courses necessary to graduate with a neuroscience (or hard-science) degree.

With that being said, I don't believe a SMP or any of science related masters program will accept me. I've been working under this impression since I started the process of searching for various post-bacc programs. I thought about returning to my alma mater to possibly complete my neuroscience requirements but my scholarship would not allow me to do so for another year. Do I have any other options available that you'd recommend?
 

2inspireU

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Let me start by saying thank you for that information. It helps a lot in making my final decision about this program.

I do have a bit of an issue that I believe will limit my options, however. Unfortunately, I graduated with a BA in Psychology and don't have a legitimate science background. I have a few science credits, in intro bio, physics and intermediate bio but I did not complete the upper division bio's, intro chem, orgo chem I and II and the physics II courses necessary to graduate with a neuroscience (or hard-science) degree.

With that being said, I don't believe a SMP or any of science related masters program will accept me. I've been working under this impression since I started the process of searching for various post-bacc programs. I thought about returning to my alma mater to possibly complete my neuroscience requirements but my scholarship would not allow me to do so for another year. Do I have any other options available that you'd recommend?

You do not need to have a science degree in order to apply to med school or to be appealing to med school. In fact, your non-science degree is more appealing than a science degree. Therefore, you really just need to take the science pre-reqs along with a little more science classes. You can wait another year and do the neuroscience degree if you want or just start taking those science classes now at your undergrad. Whatever makes the most sense to you financially is what you should go with.
 

n3xa

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I am strictly writing this information in the hopes that it will be invaluable to some other student considering attending this program. I sincerely hope that I may spare others the heartache, disappointment, financial trouble, and waste of time and energy involved with being a student in this post-bacc program. I am highly annoyed that the AMCAS website does not allow people to leave comments about these post-bacc programs because I am sure many would have been spared a lot of headaches. Therefore, I am giving you my personal in-depth review.

Dominican University is a private Catholic institution, but you do not have to be Catholic to attend and the school tries to foster a welcoming environment to all students (LBGT, ethnic minorities, atheists, etc). It is located in River Forest, IL, which is a wealthy western suburb of Chicago, IL.

Dr. Scannicchio is the post-bacc pre-med advisor and founder of the program at Dominican University. Dr. Wilson, whom should not be referred to as doctor really because his license has been suspended in Illinois since 1998 due to a medical case on Physician Assistant Suicide involving Henry Taylor, is the contact person for recommendations to DO programs for the post-bacc program. Dr. Hughes is another faculty member of the post-bacc pre-med program who interviews students for the program, and she teaches some a worthless class that is required for the program titled "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." I'll write more about this later to justify calling it worthless. However, I will first start with Dr. Scannicchio as he is the head of this post-bacc program aka scam.

Dr. Scannicchio is a retired Dentist (Maxiofacial surgeon) whom is making bank off of the students enrolled at Dominican Univ post-bacc program. He owns Bon Villa, the apartment complex in Oak Park, IL, that all Dominican Univ post-bacc students are recommended to apply for housing. Dr. Scannicchio takes power points from the internet(you will find them all if you search for the topic on google that he uses) and uses them as his lectures during classes he teaches such as Advanced Anatomy w/ cadaver I & II, medical terminology, and Histology. Moreover, the TAs grade(these are other Dominican post-bacc students who are taking the class with you and are usually in the process of applying to med school...yes, this does create conflict because 1.)if you are really good friends with the student TA you don't have to work for the grade and 2.) if you are struggling in the class or have questions the TAs are hard to get in contact with because they are students to applying to med school, taking classes, and really don't know what is going on) and usually deals with all interactions with the students. Therefore, what does Dr. Scannicchio do if he doesn't have to prepare his lectures, since they are plagiarized, and the TAs actually do the grades and other class related menial work? That is a good question. When one goes in to be advised on what they should do, Dr. Scannicchio does not have your transcripts in hand, does not know you or your background, but will "advise" you on what classes you should take. In addition, if you are struggling in the program, trying to figure out what you should do, or you are questioning whether you should be a doctor or vet, etc. He says the same thing to all students that he speaks with. If you can't become a doctor be a nurse is always mentioned first. If nursing is too hard for you, then choose some other profession in the allied health care field. That is his advising in a gist. The acceptance rate into med school is very low from this program. Therefore, Dr. Scannicchio has now been trying really hard to push students to consider and apply to Caribbean medical schools instead of MD programs in the USA. He has even had representatives come in to speak with students about Caribbean MD programs. This is due to the fact that the standards for applying to a Caribbean MD program is significantly less than a MD program in the USA. Hence, more students would get accepted in Caribbean MD programs as opposed to MD programs in the USA, therefore inflating their MD acceptance rate. Therefore are a good amount of Dominican Univ post-bacc students currently at Caribbean MD programs because they could not get into MD programs in the USA, and they still had the desire to become get a MD.

Another issue with Dr. Scannicchio is that he is favors female students over male students. He favors female students over male students because he inappropriately touches female students, but no one will come forward with complaints against him because they are in fear of their chances of getting into medical school. Since, Dr. Scannicchio is the head of the post-bacc program, and the one who puts together your committee letter for medical school. This is very well known, and any student still considering applying here should come to campus, and ask students about Dr. Scannicchio touching female students. Everyone will have a story I guarantee you.

Dr. Wilson is mainly apart of this post-bacc program because they need someone to write recommendation letters for students who apply to DO schools. Dr. Wilson is the most unprofessional out of all them involved in this program. He is also the most hardest to get in contact with because he is hardly on campus, and also teaches courses at a local community college, Triton College, in River Grove, IL. The courses Dr. Wilson teaches at Dominican Univ is Advanced Pathophysiology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Internal Medicine. Dr. Wilson is very sexist. He has a collection on his macbook pro laptop with tons of old commercials that have banned from being shown in the US or has been removed from TV. Well, during class one day he just up and shows the class a commercial that has three women around a refrigerator. When they open the refrigerator and get a beer out all the ladies nipples where showing through their shirts. He also sent an email to all the people on the post-bacc mailing list a poem, in short, making light of date rape by saying women date rape men that is how they get men to marry them. He is very unprofessional along with being a lot of other words that end in -ist. Once Dr. Wilson showed in class pictures sent to him by a former Dominican Univ post-bacc student who did international volunteering in Africa. He showed the pictures of those ailing and dying people who had such gruesome conditions going on in a manner not to teach us about those ailments, but to get our reactions like it was some circus freak sideshow. He was showing the pictures like, "Look at this, eww" or "Man, aren't you glad you don't live there?" Dr. Wilson was once talking about a disease that largely affected a small tribe of Indians in Advanced Pathophysiology. He said, "Oh, who cares it only affects those tribe of Indians. Who cares about that tribe of Indians anyway?" Well, one of the students in our class happen to be of mixed heritages, and one of those heritages was that small tribe of Indians. Dr. Wilson said, "Really, you are Indian? Are you going to school for free?" The student replied, "No." Dr. Wilson replied,"Man, I would really look into that if I were you because you should be going to school for free." Dr. Wilson is able to get away with his language mainly because he is so funny, but even Dr. Hughes has said to our class, "Dr. Wilson walks a very fine line between being funny and really inappropriate." Well, that makes two of them.

Dr. Hughes is a Clinical Psychologist by trade, and she teaches a class that she has totally made up that has no structure to it called "Clinical Behavioral Medicine." It is a required class now for incoming post-bacc students, and she is working to make it a year long class. Basically it is a class that she uses to talk about herself, other students, Dr. Scannicchio, and topics that interests her. I'm dead serious too. Every class Dr. Hughes talks endlessly about her son RJ and daughter Rachel, how much money she has, and how easy it is for her a white woman. Also, how she has to be cognizant of the stereotypes of white women with blonde hair because she has faced a lot of discrimination. She will tell you countless stories of folks being surprised she has a PhD when they see her, etc. She is also very unprofessional too. That should be no surprise here. Dr. Hughes talks a lot and usually it is much to do about nothing. Dr. Hughes and Dr. Scannicchio's professional relationship appears highly inappropriate. Dr. Hughes would come into class and tell all of Dr. Scannicchio's personal business, and her business along with other students in the program business. It was almost as if the class served as a catharsis for her. Her class discussed topics such as internet porn addiction, sexual abuse, transgender vs. transsexual, test anxiety, and many more random behavioral topics. She also did med school interview and patient interview simulations. The patient interview simulation is the meat and potatoes of her class. It is where students dress up as their role that was randomly selected, and interview actors who play their patient(the majority are theater students at Concordia Univ in River Forest, IL which is down the street from Dominican Univ). The student will either be the doctor, nurse or med student. Again, no one complains because Dr. Hughes is funny, and it is an easy "A." To take classes as a post-bacc at Dominican is $600 per course, it may be higher now. At $600 a course I am sure you would be angry to take a worthless class such as this one.

Things that were good about the program...

1.) The internship at Rush Hospital in Oak Park, IL where Dr. Scannicchio has worked for years and retired from. He has a lot of contacts up there, so students are able to intern in different departments. Not just medicine, but dental, pharmacy, etc. I did my internship in surgery with Dr. Nash (general surgeon) whom lets post-bacc students scrub in for surgeries to observe and learn about different surgical cases.

2.)In Advance Anatomy you will work with two cadavers, one male and one female. Usually you will only get to work with a cadaver in medical school.

3.) Dr. Scannicchio has recently started up an internship in Histology at Rush Hospital at their main location in Chicago, IL. The new futuristic, green, wierd looking building near the expressway. This allows post-bacc students access to view culture samples with doctors, residents, etc.

I hope you will think long and hard before enrolling into Dominican post-bacc program. If you would like to know more just send me a message.

It is easy to get accepted into the program. Not as easy as when I applied in 2008 because back then Dr. Scannicchio was still practicing medicine and trying to run the post-bacc program. Now, that he has retired he is a little more involved and thus acceptances into the program are slightly harder. To give you an idea of what I mean by slightly harder. When I was accepted Dr. Scannicchio just gave me a verbal acceptance without having looked at my transcripts and basically application. When I came in to speak with him he said, "yeah, you are accepted" then looked at my transcripts. I kid you not. Now, they will look at your application, but Dr. Scannicchio is still very lenient in acceptances because he is making a ton of money for both him and the school. I think it has been estimated that he brings in about $2million to the Dominican each year with the post-bacc program.

The students are all from diverse backgrounds. You have students who attended prestigious undergrad institutions where they either goofed off while there or the classes were too hard for them there. You have students with no science background at all, and then some students with science backgrounds and MCATs under their belts. There are a lot of gunners, and most of all cliques. If you do decide to attend Dominican Univ. allying yourself with a clique is the way to go because it makes your life easier. A clique is a group of students who help each other out. If you miss class, a friend is there to get info for you and give you everything. You don't want to attend those late seminars every Tuesday a friend(usually everyone rotates) will go and sign everyone's name. They also study together and help each other out with homework, etc.

Whether you will be successful in applying to medical school depends entirely upon you and your personality. This post-bacc program is huge because they want the money, and every year it is continually growing. Therefore, if you are an introvert you should not apply because it will be hard to get noticed by professors and Dr. Scannicchio. Another thing is that the professors at Dominican Univ. do not like the post-bacc students, and a group of students have raised concerns about possible discrimination against post-bacc students before. Professors at Dominican Univ. do not like post-bacc students because they have increased the sizes of their classes, the amount of work they have to do, and the amount of help they need with their classes. All the while, these professors pay has not increased. Before, the post-bacc program was started at Dominican Univ. their class size was very small around 10:1 because Dominican Univ. is a small private institution. However, with the growth of the post-bacc program class sizes now are 40:1 and growing. Therefore, Dominican Univ. is not a post-bacc student friendly campus. Even undergrads tend not to like post-bacc students because they feel post-bacc students make the classes harder because they already have some background knowledge of the material a lot of times, so the professor has to make the material harder as a result.

As far as reputation of the program, it is bad. I spoke to a professor at Rosalind Franklin's medical school located in Northern Chicago, IL. I told him I was a post-bacc student at Dominican Univ. He replied, "You know that program is terrible right? They have a very poor medical school acceptance rate."

I will tell you something I wish someone would have told me at the beginning. You don't need to apply to post-bacc programs because they are made to make money. Take the classes you need or need to retake at your undergrad, and apply on your own. However, if you feel you need more support because you really have a lot of damage control to do, then you are infinitely better off applying to a regular master's program in a science related field and then applying to medical school. I would be careful with special master's programs because they are essentially fancy post-bacc programs, but a special master's program (you are awarded a master's) is a heck of a lot better than a post-bacc program where you only get a worthless certificate.


Judging by your attitude about the program and Dr. Wilson, your shadowing experience, your introverted bit, and your reference to the Pima Indian story, I've got a fairly good idea as to which classmate you are.

Before I dive into a long-winded response, here's a bit of my background: I started the program in 2009 because I wanted to take some upper-division biology classes, was a classmate alongside the OP in internal medicine when the Pima Indian story occurred, and am now applying to medical school, hoping to matriculate in 2012.

The number one question I receive from prospective students is what are my chances of getting into medical school after the post-bacc program? And I've bolded quite the most important thing you've said in this thread. It's important to do your research and come up with a strategic game plan that works well for YOU. Since allopathic schools don't do grade replacement and osteopathic schools do, it would be wise to apply to include DO schools when applying. I've also bolded in red some incredibly false information about what to do if you're in the low gpa boat. Allopathic schools keep graduate GPAs separate, while osteopathic schools combine them in the AACOMAS primary (BTW I have a master's degree in a hard science field). Every school weighs graduate grades differently, but getting a master's degree isn't going to automatically offset a poor undergraduate GPA. Your best bet in that case is to utilize the DO grade replacement system. It's also unfair to make sweeping generalizations about post-bacc programs as a whole, especially when you've only attended *one.*

I've also noticed that my peers in this program who fail to get into *any* medical school do so because they don't apply broadly enough and/or they don't consider osteopathic medical schools. I also think it's entirely unfair to come to conclusions about those who decide to go the Caribbean route without mentioning their story, numbers, and circumstances. I'm also not really sure where you came up with the low acceptance rate, as there are a fair amount of names on the acceptance board in Parmer Hall: Tufts, Boston, Loyola, Rush, MSU, Creighton, Wake Forest, Midwestern, LECOM, AT Still. How did you come to that conclusion?

Dr. Hughes's class brings up a lot of topics that need to be addressed and as a peer health educator that works with at-risk clients I found that to be great. I completely disagree that her patient simulation exercise isn't on the "good parts of the program" list. It's the exact same exercise I had to do in order to become a certified HIV tester/counselor with the department of public health and believe me it's not easy. She also has her students write a personal statement as an assignment and then provides comments. At the very least it forces you (well, at least me) to start putting *something* down on paper. And you get to do mock interviews. How this class is "worthless" is beyond me.

Dr. Wilson's slightly brash sense of humor certainly does not go over well with a couple of students and I can understand how some of the things stated above sounds even worse without context or tone of voice. I'm sorry that the Pima Indian comment offended you, but Pima girl and I were actually joking about that the other day. Also, I would highly encourage anyone to do their research about Wilson's case as it's available on the internet. Take home message: make photocopies of *everything.*

Admittedly, anatomy and pathophysiology were incredibly difficult for me because I didn't come from a strong bio background. I also felt like I struggled because there is a lot more independent learning involved than I'd like for those classes. The learning curve is steep in patho when you've just had general biology and microbiology in 200...1? Regardless, I managed to do well and by well I mean A's. I took a full year of upper-division biology courses, not just one class per semester.

The program is currently at ~100 students.

Undergraduate students complaining about post-baccs is also nothing new. My undergrad institution had a post-bacc program and there was always a bit of meh attitudes between the two social groups. I never had a problem with groups as a whole.

I would also suggest that those who are wondering about their chances based on their numbers+mcat+experience to ask knowledgable physicians/adcoms with a solid track record of providing sage advice on SDN such as Catalystik in the WAMC subforum.

Even if I don't get into med school this year, and with my unbalanced MCAT score that certainly is more of a possibility than I'd like to admit, I have absolutely no regrets about this program. Take that for what it's worth. I would also highly encourage prospective students to pm me with their concerns and I will be more than happy to address them objectively.
 
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jz84

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WOW

OP I would say you made one correct statement: "Whether you will be successful in applying to medical school depends entirely upon you." Nobody will hold your hand through the application process and nobody will take your classes or exams for you. The same goes for completing a post-bacc program.

As a former student of the Dominican program who was accepted to a US MD school I cannot speak more highly of the Dominican program as well as Drs Scannicchio, Hughes and Wilson. Yes the classes push you to more independent study, but that is how medical school works, and I feel this program prepares its students to do so, far more so than even my undergrad institution.

Also, the instructors mentioned have gone above and beyond to help answer my questions and give me guidance. I was never turned away and received excellent counseling and encouragement. These professors truly want to get to know the students and the value of the program is that they are committed to the students first.

But you have to put in the effort, and you have to take the initiative. Just because you show up does not entitle you to succeed. You have to work at it. Please do not slander a program that many of us have found valuable.
 

ML1303

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I would like to begin by saying that it is not my intention to disregard anyone's opinion. One of the beauties of a forum such as this is the ability for people to share opinions, thus giving the community a wealth of information and a conduit to make more informed decisions. That being said, there is a clear distinction between personal tastes and incorrect transmission of facts, the latter of which seems to be glaringly obvious. However, in an attempt to circumvent an inevitable, "he said, she said," I would like to express my personal experiences and opinions.

I am a student in Dominican University's Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Sciences Program. I just recently completed my second year, and will be applying to medical school this year, for matriculation in the Fall of 2012. As a non-Science major, I had many pre-requisites to complete. Dr Scannicchio sat with me, transcripts in hand, and gave me many alternate routes that would benefit the journey I was to undertake. We discussed what would be most advantageous, financially, academically and personally. I feel as though the advising I have been giving was tailored specifically to myself, and my situation, with to goal of presenting the most complete and competitive medical school application possible. I have also found Dr Scannicchio's teaching to be extremely beneficial. Having never taken Anatomy, Medical Terminology or Histology before coming to Dominican, I can say that I feel as though no disservice was done by way of lack of information. I learned an immeasurable amount.

I have had the pleasure of taking both Advanced Pathophysiology and Internal Medicine and Family Practice with Dr Wilson. For the record, the term doctorate in relation to a doctorate degree comes from the Latin docere meaning "to teach," but I digress. I can honestly say I feel as though I learned an immense amount of medicine in these courses. Having not attended multiple Post-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical programs, I do not know how other courses are run. However, I am aware that many medical schools utilize problem based learning techniques. In these courses, students are given cases in which they must compile a differential diagnosis. This is not only a practice of memorization of diseases, but the practical use of an invaluable skill: critical thinking. This is the exact manner in which Dr Wilson teaches his course. At the end of the year, you may not remember each and every disease, but you most absolutely can think your way through a case study, a manner of thinking that we will be using the rest of our lives. It is a shame that one can so quickly remember a story involving a disease affecting Pima Indians, but cannot recall the mentioning of the disease itself. However, I will never forget Diabetic Nephropathy, because of that story.

Dr Hughes is one of the most impressive women I have ever met. She is as intelligent as she is caring. I have always garnered relationships with professors, and have many of which I consider mentors, but none as much so as Dr Hughes. Her door is always open. No matter what the situation, be it personal, academic or otherwise, she will be ready with appropriate advice. Her training as a Licensed Clinical Psychologist makes her easy to talk to, and an excellent listener. Her class was extremely interesting. I would suggest any person who finds "random behavioral topics," inappropriate or unnerving explore alternate career paths. Physicians never know with what ailment a patient will present. Whether it be physical or mental, they must be treated without judgment and with the same level of respect.

I would be remiss to write a review of this program without including the non-post-baccalaureate faculty. The professors at Dominican are extremely learned and caring. As a PBPM student, I have never felt discriminated against or looked at differently. I have done well this these classes because I work hard. I have always felt that professors appreciate this. As for the undergraduates, I consider many of them friends, and have heard very few negative remarks about Post-Baccalaureate students.

I came to the program never having taken the MCAT. I was able to take a Princeton Review course, through Dominican University, with a substantial discount. I feel as though the course prepared me very well, and am currently awaiting the results of my May 20th exam.

As was aforementioned, this is strictly my personal opinion and review of the program. I understand distinct individuals handle the stresses of the journey into medicine differently. However, what is a decidedly unpleasant road (with MCATs, Personal Statements, and other hurdles) I feel has been made extraordinarily easier thanks to this program. I know many students that have matriculated into medical school, both from Dominican's program and be other means. The common denominator is hard work. Regardless of the means, the end is the same. That being said, Dominican has made me feel extremely well prepared for the journey that lies ahead of me.

I apologize for this lengthy dissertation. If anyone would like more information, or has any other questions, please feel free to send me a private message, and I would be more than happy to oblige.
 

dk10

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As a Dominican post-bacc alumnus having just finished my first year of medical school (and yes, my school happens to be located within the contiguous 48 states), I am really surprised to hear such remarks being made toward a program that undoubtedly helped me through every step of my medical school application process. Having graduated with an undergraduate liberal arts degree, I came to Dominican seeking science courses and direction in applying to medical school - and that is exactly what I received. I initially chose Dominican's post-bacc program because it was NOT a master's program. Honestly, I wanted to go to medical school and really did not want (or want to pay for) a master's degree along the way.

I will never forget the first time I met with Dr. Scannicchio who, in my opinion, knows better than anyone about choosing one's medical career path. He graduated from dental school only to go BACK to medical school because he knew that was what would make him truly happy. Personally, I much preferred talking to him about my future career in medicine than a standard career counselor who never went through the process... but that's just me. Regardless, he was the first person in a long line of individuals who I felt actually took the time to talk to me about my goals. He called me himself, spoke with me about my situation and encouraged me to apply to the program. In no way have I ever thought of him as anything but an excellent mentor, professor and professional. Some of what is being said about him on this forum makes me absolutely sick. He is a person who genuinely cares about his students' success and will vouch for them personally.

Again, having just finished my first year of medical school only days ago I can honestly say that in almost every unit of Anatomy, Physiology, Neuroscience and Psychiatry I took this year there were times when I thought to myself "Thank God I already learned this at Dominican." To give specific examples: Dr. Scannicchio taught bone anatomy and physiology in a manner that I never forgot. Dr. Wilson has an exceptional ability at explaining acid/base disorders - ask any of his former students who have tried to learn it in medical school. And, Dr. Hughes supplements every single psychological disorder she talks about with concrete evidence and examples which allowed me to breeze through each psychiatry class I took this year. Dr. Scannicchio, Dr. Hughes and Dr. Wilson are excellent professors with more worldly knowledge than any student could even hope to encounter. Yes, each student is expected to take on a personal responsibility to learn the material that is presented in class. However, this is excellent preparation for medical school. If you aren't prepared to spend hours upon hours looming over your notes, then you won't even hope to pass a single medical school class.

If nothing else, I will say that getting into medical school depends solely on how much work you are willing to put into the process. It does not matter how much you think you might be entitled to getting in...it simply matters how much you really work for it.
 

DK12

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As much as I would LOVE to get into a pissing contest over each and every claim made and how it is a twisted and over-dramatized misinterpretation of the truth…I will not, because as ML said, and I agree, the beauty of this forum is that people are allowed to speak their minds, and my desire to refute false claims would overshadow my point- which is to speak to the wealth of experience and opportunity this program offers.
Let me give a little background. I am from one of those “prestigious undergraduate institutions” however I neither goofed off nor did I find the classes too hard. For me it was the lack of guidance I received- I did not know when, where, or how to apply. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in Biology and applying to medical school I did not receive any acceptances- only to find out it was because I had applied too late, my personal statement was not an accurate representation of me, and I applied to too few schools (and did not include DO, which I did not even know about at that point). As a result, I started to apply to post-baccalaureate programs, and ended up at Dominican University. I just completed my second year with the program and will be starting classes at a US medical school in the fall.
Now, for those that may be in the same boat as I was, or are interested in a post-baccalaureate program for their own reasons let me break down this program as I viewed it.
This program is absolutely what you make of it. Everyone in the program has graduated from college and everyone has come to the conclusion that they are interested in pursuing a career in healthcare. By choosing to embark on a career path that is long, grueling, and devoid of “hand-holding” the assumption is that this program will serve as a guide- as an extra “rung in the ladder” providing you with informative and challenging classes as well as mentoring from people who not only have gone through the rigors of professional school themselves, but are highly invested in your success.
Dr. Scannicchio provides assistance and knowledge every step of the way. Before you begin classes he sits down with you, looks at your transcripts and discusses the classes you should take. My meeting with Dr. Scannicchio was very helpful. In fact, he saved me from unnecessarily retaking a class from my undergrad and helped me to structure a class schedule that would enhance my application and provide me with knowledge needed to re-take my MCAT and prepare me for medical school. In regards to his Anatomy, Anatomy Lab, and Medical Terminology classes: I was able to get first-hand experience of these courses at a large undergraduate institution and both classes provide a large amount of valuable information and can be quite challenging; however, Dr. Scannicchio’s classes give the student the ability to work closely with cadavers, and interact not only with a knowledgeable teacher but a PHYSICIAN who can speak from personal experience about Anatomy, Medical Terminology, and EVERYTHING ELSE that is valuable to becoming a doctor. Beyond being my instructor Dr. Scannicchio was a mentor to me and to many of my peers. If a student is struggling in a class, he works very hard to give them all the help they need. At any point in the day, a student can walk into his office and ask him advice about applying to medical school. He facilitates the writing of committee letters and is more than willing to provide personal letters of recommendation if necessary- which is more then I could say for any of my professors in undergrad.
I also had the pleasure of being a student of Dr. Wilson’s, in both his Pathophysiology and Internal Medicine courses. I second n3xa’s comment and say that Dr. Wilson’s humor may not go over well with several students and can certainly be misconstrued if taken out of context or posted online. However, Dr. Wilson has such an immeasurable amount of knowledge about diagnosing pathologies and treating a patient that I feel it is a wonderful gift that he is willing to share his knowledge with students at Dominican University. His class teaches students to critically think, to analyze a scenario where all the facts may not be clearly laid out, and come to a conclusion that carries more weight than a grade, but when applied to a future career as a doctor, can save another human being’s life. Some of my friends who have just completed their first and second years of medical school said they still refer to Dr. Wilson’s PowerPoint on blood gases when studying for their exams. Point blank- his class teaches you to think quickly and on your toes- which are EXACTLY how things are going to be in medical school.
I am going to piggyback on ML’s statement and agree that “impressive” is a perfect way to describe Dr. Hughes. Considering she is a teacher, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, and a mother, the amount of attention and effort she gives to each student in the program is incredible. Her course is extremely interesting and presents topics that may seem inappropriate and random to some but are exactly the things you will encounter when going into healthcare where random is the status quo- nothing can be expected. One of the most valuable portions of the class is where the students get to construct their personal statements and then she critiques EACH INDIVIDUAL STATEMENT and helps EACH INDIVIDUAL STUDENT construct their perfect personal statement. This in and of itself could have saved my first round of applications to medical school.
Yes- you need to be able to interact with other students and make friends and speak up and ask for advice and make a name for yourself in this program for it to do you any good, but THAT IS HOW LIFE IS. If you really want something then you are willing to do absolutely whatever it takes to get it then you will be successful. I came into this program thinking that I wasn’t going to be able to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor and am leaving this program about to start my journey to becoming a doctor. The journey of applying to medical school is a hard one and it is littered with all kinds of twists and turns to make life extra difficult, but to also test to see if you have what it takes. This program helps you so that you don’t have to take the journey alone.
I also apologize for going on for so long, and second that if anyone has any questions or would like to discuss anything I mentioned further, feel free to send me a private message.
 

ASingh1989

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HOLD ON A SECOND...

Ok this will be a bit long post so I am sorry for that but there is just so much that needs to be cleared up. The previous was by someone who is clearly bitter and angry about their experience at Dominican University.

The post-bacc program at Dominican university will be one the reasons that I get into medical school. I really only have one sentiment when mentioning the post-bacc program at Dominican, it is one of gratitude for my admittance and I am proud to soon be a graduate and HIGHLY RECOMMMEND THIS PROGRAM TO ALL SEARCHING FOR A POST-BACC PROGRAM.
Now on to the task at hand, dispelling the falsehoods of one individual with the truth and facts given by someone still in this program and graduating next year. Ok let’s start from the top, with Dr. Scannicchio.

Dr. Scannicchio is the head of the program and is an oromaxillofacial surgeon but that is basically where the accuracy of “2inspireU” ends. Dr. Scannicchio is indeed a partial owner of Bon Villa apartments, of which I am currently a resident, and the reason it is mentioned to many post-bacc students who come into our program is due to its vicinity to Dominican university (it is only 2 miles away) not because Scannicchio is a partial owner. It is also probably a good thing that a teacher you see everyday has a partial ownership. Since I see Dr. Scannicchio every day, if anything were to ever go wrong, I have someone who can instantly make a difference to my living arrangement. What that has to do with anything is beyond me. As far as “making bank off of the post-bacc students” this is perhaps the most ludicrous statements in the whole rant. Drs. Scannicchio, Hughes, and Wilson have made enough money that they certainly do not need to “make bank” off of anyone seeing as how they are quite accomplished themselves. They often joke with me about “paying to work at Dominican” and judging by the lifestyle they lead, I believe them (we will get into that later). Moving on to the academic side of things…

Dr. Scannicchio is a great teacher in and out of the classroom. I had the distinct pleasure of having him in my advanced anatomy class and cadaver dissection for 2 semesters, along with histology, and medical terminology. I have to ask a question to ask those reading this, “does it really matter where a teacher gets the information as long as you learn the information and your overall knowledge is increased?” I am sure that the resounding answer would be No. While I do not know where Dr. Scannicchio gets his lecture that he presents in class (with much gusto and humor I might add) he makes his points very clear in class as to what is important and what is information you can put on the back burner and safe for later. His exams, while difficult, are a great representation of the material covered in class but as he says in the beginning of the class “this is a tough class, earning an A will be difficult and will require a lot of outside learning” he makes no apologies about the style of his teaching and what is to be covered. No one is going to hold your hand in medical school and that is the attitude that Dr. S takes while teaching in the classroom. Though he has this attitude he is always willing to help a student so long as he sees that the struggling student is trying their best. While some may not like his teaching style (some of my close friends) all of us were able to achieve great scores (not one of the people that I studied with got less than an A-). He has always been more than fair about the grading scale and does his best to cater to all levels of experience with the highly complicated and at times boring subject matter. Anatomy is a tough subject as I am sure those that have taken it know, but having a good teacher certainly eases the misery that a dry subject can impose on an individual. Dr. Scannicchio was that teacher for me; he really brought anatomy to life (pun intended) by working in many medical stories and trying to make the subject as pertinent to real life as possible.

As an advisor Dr. Scannicchio gets all his information as to what a student is to take from the many deans of medical school, whom he is in frequent contact with, to learn what is the most effective way of getting post-baccs into medical school. To talk about a personal experience … I was in double minds as to which class to take microbiology or molecular cellular biology (MCB) in the upcoming semester. Naturally I went to Dr. Scannicchio to try and get his opinion on the issue. WITH MY TRANSCRIPT IN HAND, he told how he had had a recent meeting with a dean of a local medical school (Loyola to give my story legitimacy) and the dean said that he really values students who have taken MCB. Scannicchio passed this information on to me and naturally I registered for MCB for next semester. Pretty sure that he had fulfilled the role of advisor well in my scenario, not to mention the countless of advising appoints of the others in my program. As far as advising as to which school to apply, here Dr. S is a realist. He is not going to tell you to apply to Hopkins when your GPA is a 3.0 and you have an MCAT score of 27. He will tell you where are going to be competitive. I myself was wondering whether to stay here or go the Caribbean. He told me that I should HOLD OFF on applying to the Caribbean medical schools and to wait and see how I perform in the post-bacc program first. He said that “THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN GETTING INTO A SCHOOL IN THE STATES” but the Caribbean is a viable option for those who can’t seem to get the grades or the MCAT scores and seriously want to become a doctor. I am sorry if this does not appeal to some people but it is the truth and Dr. S is honest about your chances, good or bad. With regards to having representatives come and talk to our class about the schools in the Caribbean as we have many non-traditional students in our class and for some the Caribbean is an attractive offer. But under no circumstances is it pushed on you in our program. In addition to recruiters to the Caribbean schools, we have had audiences with the deans of many of the surrounding medical school. Loyola, UIC, and AT Still just to name a few.

The notion that Dr. S favors women over men, is laughable. He, in my experience, has always been congenial to all his student and being a man I have always been close to Dr. S. Building relationships with your teachers and directors is important to your continued success in whatever you do and it is all about making an effort to be known and getting your name out there. I frequently came to optional meeting and volunteered my time to help out Dr. S whenever possible. Dr. Scannicchio likes those that “are the first ones in and the last ones out” a frequent saying that he uses. If the women were more active in some classes then clearly they will be noticed more but this says nothing about Dr. Scannicchio’s favoring women over men. As far as saying that Dr. S inappropriately touches student is a dangerous accusation and without a complaint (I am certain that no woman, no matter how much they want to be a doctor, would tolerate being inappropriately touched.) is baseless and a direct attack on Dr. Scannicchio’s impeccable character and it is shameful that anyone would stoop so low as to besmirch his good name.

Let me also just clear up this whole business about the T.A.’s grading exhibiting favoritism to students that they like. That is just straight up FALSE and a LIE. I am friends with almost all of them and I have yet to see any special treatment from any one of them in regards to a grade boost or information about any exam material (even when sometimes prodded by fellow students). I deeply resent that fact that “2inspireU” is insinuating a bias in the grading system. There is only 1 person that is responsible for your grades in the Dominican post-bacc program, YOU. If you are a conscientious student and put in the time and effort that each class deserves, you reap the benefits, if not, well then you get what you put in. The teachers and T.A.’s are always around the school many showing up 30 minutes before class and staying (depending on their schedule) up to hours after the class. All the teachers, Drs. Scannicchio, Hughes, and Wilson are always available if you need them. They start each class with their email and CELL PHONE numbers. If you can’t get a hold of them, you simply aren’t trying hard enough (I am on a texting basis with all 3). As a T.A. next year, during our first meeting with the faculty (Drs. Scannicchio, Hughes, and Wilson), they talked intimately about how if a breach of confidentiality occurred at anytime, for any reason, with anyone, it was cause for immediate dismal from your position.

On to Dr. Wilson…

Dr. Wilson and I have developed a great relationship in my year at Dominican. I will agree that sometimes his humor can be inappropriate but he does out of love and not with the intention of offending anyone. If you approach him out of class he a great resource to talk to about the inner working of medical school, and gain some practical knowledge about what you can except once in medical school. He is a genuinely nice guy and definitely someone that you should get to know and with hold judgment on until doing so. As far as his class is concerned, advanced pathophysiology, it was one of the most informative classes I have ever taken. He is clearly an expert in his field (cardiology) and knows a great deal about virtually any field of medicine. He was one of the main reasons that I did well on my MCAT bio section as he really incorporates his knowledge to ensure that everyone learns in his class. We went over countless cases that he faced during his time as a doctor (the legal case against him is ridiculous to begin with, just look at the facts of the case, while controversial in nature. Dr. Wilson did not deserve the punishment bestowed on him and the case is still in the works). He is a fabulous teacher and someone that I hope to learn from in my remaining time at Dominican.

Lastly and perhaps the teacher that I have spent the most time with Dr. Hughes…

I will first address her class, Clinical Behavioral Medicine. While the topics are perhaps obscure to some, there is definitely a method to her madness (I use this term lovingly). All the topics that covered pertain to mental health, a field that is not only opaque to many physicians practicing, but many more people are coming into hospital with mental ailments and it is important to be able to recognize them and treat them accordingly. Dr. Hughes told the class about herself and “her story” on the first day to put our class at ease and let everyone know that she is a normal person just like us and came from a modest background and was able to achieve success despite being stereotyped her whole life. It was neither overstated nor irrelevant information. She talks about her relationship with Dr. Scannicchio to reassure the more timid students, or the ones simply more comfortable with her, that she is there to help. She also makes it a point to tell all the students that if you need something done that she is a great relay to Dr. S in matters of importance. The patient simulated interview at the end of the class with the actors could be one of the most enlightening things that I have done to this point in my pursuit of a medical degree. We, as students in her class, are essentially in charge with dealing with a “patient” (actor hired to have ailments for us to identify and then take the appropriate course of action). It is a great experience and quickly throws you into a scenario that you will face on a daily basis when you become a physician. This experience was many things: insightful, innovative, and eye-opening BUT CERTAINLY NOT WORTHLESS. The class as a whole focused on the mentality of a doctor, not just the clinical aspect of things. At Dominican, we strive to become well-rounded individual so as to become well-rounded and culturally astute physicians.

One thing I can’t control is the price per credit at Dominican university but what I can tell you is that Dominican university’s post-bacc program is worth every penny. The teachers in my program have a vested interest in seeing me do well and have done everything in their power to ensure that I meet my goal of attaining admission to a quality medical school. As a member of Dr. Hughes’ research team, she frequently took my fellow researches and I to lunch and dinner and same goes for Drs. Scannicchio and Wilson (the bill could have been in the hundreds of dollars, clearly not trying to “milk the post-baccs for money”). They are generous not only with their wallets but more importantly with the variety of knowledge and wisdom that they have to impart on us, the students. They are not only wonderful teachers, advisors, but great people as well. Dr. Scannicchio and Dr. Hughes even took time out of their busy schedules to meet my parents and me for lunch to discuss my future and the appropriate courses of actions that should be taken to ensure my success. These people have been a blessing to me and family and I truly thank them for all their hard work that they put in for my benefit. TO SEE THEM ATTACKED IS SOMETHING THAT I WILL NOT STAND FOR.

If ANYONE wants to contradict anything that I have said please feel free to message me privately and we can talk about it. One thing that I think is absolutely tasteless, and an act of cowardice, is to post something on a well read public forum and bad mouth a program that gave you all the chances for success as it did for me. There is no need to attack an entire program just because you did not see the desired results. The Dominican Post-Baccalaureate program is the best decision that I could have made since not getting into medical school and my future is looking very bright after having completing 1 year. Once again I would like to thank the faculty and staff that made that possible, Drs. Louis Scannicchio, Carlissa Hughes, and Robert Lance Wilson. I will be forever grateful for the profound influence you has had on me and my family.

Sincerely,

A concerned and proud member of the Dominican Post-Baccalaureate Program
 

Amenhotep IV

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There is so much that I would like to say right now, but since most of it has already been said I'll just post a few things of my own. First off, Dr Scannicchio has always been freely available for help of any kind--either in his office (he keeps regular office hours and his door is always open), or by his cell phone, since he makes his number available to all students. Dr Hughes is also always available. Her time at school is limited, but she WILL find time for you. Not only that, but she will make damn good use of that time. Within five minutes of talking to her she'll have constructed a pretty accurate picture of who you are, and will then analyze your strengths and weaknesses to give you a very personalized plan for how you can succeed in the program AND in the medical school application process. I guess that comes from her background as a clinical psychologist. Both Drs Hughes and Scannicchio are so incredibly passionate about students succeeding and are two of the most supportive people I have ever met (by the way, I am a male student and the bit about favoritism or acting inappropriate is just absurd). As for Dr. Wilson, I have not yet had a class with him but there is one thing I can say for sure. Throughout just about the entire year I would hear students talking excitedly about what they had learned in his class. I'd hear them sharing his stories or applying what they learned to material in other classes. It was easy to see that he had a way of making his classes tough, yet fun and full of information that would stay with his students. As for me, I came from undergrad with a biology major, two failed medical school applications, and a general feeling that it wasn't worth trying anymore. One year later after working my rear off (that's what you have to do to succeed here AND in med school) my application is much stronger in every way and I feel like I actually have a chance. Submitting my application in 4 days and I will add more if I make it!

By the way, here's my endorsement for a postbacc program in general instead of a Master's program. Sure that extra degree looks nice, but the accreditation process required for a school to be able to issue one comes with very strict guidelines. There's no room for you to be able to choose the classes that will benefit you the most. You'll be taking a lot of classes that you aren't necessarily interested in and won't necessarily benefit you in med school. For example, I didn't need the general science classes so instead I concentrated on more advanced ones as well as psychology. That's why I didn't apply to the programs at Rosalind Franklin or Loyola. That's also why Dr Scannicchio wanted this to be a postbacc program rather than a Master's program.
 

Durbs13

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As a student who just completed the Dominican Post-Bacc program, I could not believe how inaccurate 2inspireU's description of the program was. From the very first day I felt the faculty was genuinely concerned with helping me accomplish my goal of matriculating into medical school. If they were only interested in my money, I would have never gotten the personal attention I did throughout the year.

One of the first things Dr Hughes does at the start of the class is schedule a meeting with every student so she can get to know them personally. Each meeting is supposed to be 30min, but if she does not have previous obligations, they could last as long as an hour. I have never heard of a professor giving every student that much time prior to meeting her.

Dr Scannicchio is not only a great teacher but also very helpful in choosing classes for the upcoming year and guiding students to a career path that will make them happiest. The idea of him giving everyone the same generic advice is ridiculous. I have heard numerous stories of people who entered this program to get into medical school, but along the way found a career path that was better suited for them.

And lastly, Dr Wilson. He is one of the smartest people I have ever taken a class with. Even though he has not been practicing medicine for over ten years, his knowledge and understanding of diseases are still incredible. I took both of his classes (Adv Pathophys and Internal Medicine), and can honestly say, are the two classes most similar to medical school in terms of content and quantity. I did a two semester internship with a primary care physician, and he was impressed with my knowledge of diseases and ability to read x-rays, EKG's, and blood tests. All of these things and more I learned in Dr Wilson's classes.

It is a testament to the program that one biased review from a bitter individual would cause such a stir from other students from the program. Since Dominican is a small university, they like to say we are a family more than individual students. That could not be more true. Every student and faculty work together, rather than compete in order to get ahead. There is much more that I could write, but it looks like my cohorts have done a good job of that already.
 
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theproject66

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It is obvious from the support shown by the other students on this forum that the claims made by 2inspireU are false. I am also currently a student in Dominican's post bacc program, and I could not have asked for a more dedicated group of advisors and educators. Dr.'s Scannicchio and Hughes have cultivated a wonderful program that fosters great connection and awareness of the local community of healthcare providers. The program is designed to help students build a realistic picture of todays healthcare environment while at the same time demystifying the application process.

I think it is important for those that are considering Dominicans program or other post bacc programs to understand that what is offered here is very tangible. I have a B.S. from a large state school, but I was missing several required science courses when I decided to pursure medicine. Because I didn't have those prerequisit basic science courses most of the masters programs were not a good option for me. I spoke with Dr. Scannicchio before choosing Dominican. He was very confident that with hard work I could get in, and he obviously understood the application process very well. Based on his enthousiasm and kindheartedness I felt the program was a good fit for me.

In my first semester I took three courses required by the program for the certificate, but was not starting my prerequisit science courses so I was unsure of how productive I was being. This was until I began volunteering at a local health clinic. The three classes I was taking were Dr. Scannicchio's Intro to Pathophysiology, Dr. Hughes' Clinical Behavioral Medicine, and a course in Biomedical Ethics. Dr. Scannicchio's Intro Patho class involved a high degree of independence. He had alot of material to introduce but he did it effectively. For the first time I saw the basics of history taking and the most common disease processes; diabetes, hypertension, and breast cancer. At the health clinic I volunteer at I have since had the privilage of taking and observing at least 100 patient histories. I recognized disease processes from Dr. Scanniccio's Intro Patho class in almost every case, and I take probing histories because of it. Due to my skill in history taking my superiors at the clinic have had me train many of the new volunteers, most of which are enrolled in masters programs at Loyola or Rosalind Franklin. The masters programs have their place and merit, but they seem to lack the nuts and bolts application to healthcare that I have gained from Dominican's program.

Another class I believe has contributed to my experience in administering effective healthcare is the mock patient interview from Dr. Hughes Clinical Behavioral Medicine. Of course after taking my first few real patient histories I got over the awkwardness of the interaction, but what I brought with me was an introspective analysis of the process. In Dr. Hughes class you get a chance to explore the doctor-patient interaction from outside yourself and really understand the dynamics of the process. In most cases you are trying to tactfully retrieve very personal information from a reluctant person in 15-20 minutes. We take for granted that people "trust" healthcare providers. Many times people will withold the most critical information from you and you would never know unless you are actively analysing your approach to history taking. That is an invaluable skill I have taken away from Dr. Hughes' class.

Dominican as a whole is very supportive of it's post baccs and arranged for a Princeton Review course to be taught on campus, at a reduced rate, at a time when most students could attend. I am very thankful for this, and feel very confident in my recent performance on the MCAT because of it. Not only is the school very supportive, but former students are obviously grateful for the opportunity the program has given them. I have met several former post baccs that are now medical students. They were all very eager to share their experiences with the current students, and one of them was even kind enough to prepare a presentation on managing the application process. I have never been a part of a program that was more dedicated to the success of it's students than the post bacc pre med program at Dominican University.

It is obvious that through the courses offered at Dominican I have been prepare for my MCAT, Personal statement, and general science requirements. What is less tangible is the introspective analysis that Dr.'s Scannicchio and Hughes promote and inspire in every student. Because of this I understand why I want to be a doctor, and how hard I am willing to work in order to achieve that goal.

I think it is inherent in the philosophy of any post bacc pre med program to believe in second chances. Sadly this inevitably leaves room for people who performed poorly before to perform poorly again.

I hope that those who are willing to work harder than everyone around them would take that second chance. They will certainly recieve all the unique benefits that Dominican's post bacc program has to offer, and hopefully realize their goals of getting into medical school.

Of course if you have any questions feel free to message me as well.
 

n3xa

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It's unfortunate that whatever constructive criticism the OP had was negated by some awful advice for low GPA students, amongst other things.

I also question whether or not the OP got into medical school and whether or not an acceptance would change the tone of the two posts above. If the OP did not get into medical school, I think it would be a great opportunity to take this time and figure out what you need to do in order to improve your application.

There are a couple of incredibly inspiring stories on SDN about those who have waited 6+ years to matriculate. There are low GPA and low MCAT support threads on here. It can be done, but be prepared for a long, uphill battle.

And those wondering what schools might be a good fit for you, WAMC is run by someone with an actual track record on SDN:

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/forumdisplay.php?f=418
 

aple43

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I have read everything my fellow students have written, and I don’t think I could have said any of it better myself. I just want to say a couple of things I think most of them didn’t say. I don’t know what world you’re living in but in this one no matter where you go having friends in high places will get you somewhere. As some one who has had no other choice but to rely on a friend for class notes, because things in my life have been fighting against my education, I for one thank God for allowing me to know and befriend such wonderful people, who, out of the kindness of their own heart felt a little pity on me and helped me through one of my top two hardest years in school. Without the push and understanding of my friends I would have not gotten the grades I did.
The mentioning of overseas schools was not even close to an option for me until Dr. Hughes took her time, the little that she has, to realize that me getting away, far far away, from home maybe the only way I make it though med school, however, she also said it should be my last resort after trying far away in state schools.
Let me tell you about the amazing Dr. Hughes she was there for me in my hardest times, she devotes her heart and soul to each an every one of her students. She is always there to lend an ear a hand...whatever it is you need to help you. In my life I have never had any random person know me so well and try to help me out soo much. I also do not think I have ever had any teacher fight for me the way Dr. Scannicchio has. It is all because he sees each and every one of us for who we are. To call him a sexist is absurd he thinks of every woman in the program as his daughter that he is helping and protecting from the harsh reality of the real world, and each man as his son who he must guide. If you listen to him it will save you a lot of heart ache in the long run. His touch is not inappropriate but loving in the only way he knows how because that’s how he treats his daughters.
Dr. Wilson is the one teachers that I can honestly say I don’t know too well, but after taking one lab with him I can say yes he makes bad comments, but they are all funny to me because I understand his humor. Sometimes he steps over that very fine line between right and wrong but I can tell you right now he knows when he does. How u ask?? Ill tell you the women in this program don’t take “abuse” the only one who seems to have “kept her mouth shut”…(about “abuse”) is this person. When or if any of the teachers step out of line you can be reassured that things will be settled properly and consequences will be held. I don’t know of any other school that responds so quickly and diligently to convictions or problems. I feel safer and better at this school than I did at my small undergraduate school. I feel better about my application to medical school than I ever have and I owe it all to those three teachers.
I did not get the opportunity to take Dr. Wilsons class pathology last year, but I did stand back and watch each and every one of my friends do homework for the class, and I can honestly say they learned way more than they think because I saw the change in their education level from beginning to end, and because of that I am taking the class next semester even though I technically do not have to come back at all next year but I want the same experience they had because I watched my friends get smarter each day.
I’m also going to take a minute to guess and say that you have never had a class with Dr. Braun, Dr. CJ, Dr. Jonah, Dr. Craig, or Professor Weismann because if you had and took the time to talk to the teachers, that you are bashing for doing nothing wrong, I think you would have found out that they care about our education just as much as the three Doctors who head our program, and they also like the challenge we give them in class.
One last thing as a post-bac who has many Dominican undergraduate students as friends they don’t even know about our program because they don’t care, they like us for who we are and they don’t see their classes getting harder, they just want to pass! The ones who do have issues well that’s on them they should be happy classes are getting harder, because, we are inversely increasing their education level in the end. Have you even bothered to talk to the undergrads some of them are smarter than post-bacs no matter how much previous education we have had, they give us a run for our money so don’t discredit them either. I’m sorry you made no friends while there because I have made amazing ones and I think there are some really amazing people at that school.
 

2inspireU

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I stand by everything I have said in this thread, and just because those of you who have had a great experience in the program choose to speak up does not negate what I have stated. It was my experience while there, and I know many more who share the same sentiments.

What I wished when I was choosing post-bacc programs to apply too was that there were honest opinions posted about personal experiences in the programs like those expressed in this thread. There is even more that I didn't even get into on here because it is a way more touchy subject. However, I encourage those looking at this program to pm those who have posted disagreeing with me and to pm me about our experiences.

I'm in the process of applying to med school, and when I am accepted I will owe it to finding the help, support, and guidance outside of this post-bacc program.
 

n3xa

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Of course not. Everyone is certainly entitled to their opinion. But telling people that getting a master's degree in a hard science, non-SMP program is going to somehow offset a low undergraduate gpa is just dangerous advice. :caution:

It sounds like the take-home message here is to do your research on what program is right for you and take advantage of the opportunities available here. If you are an introvert, you are probably going to have issues no matter what school you're at.

Best of luck to you this year on your apps and I hope you find the support you need elsewhere.

DrMidlife also has a great track record of providing sound advice: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showpost.php?p=10990801&postcount=2


One last note: As I suspected, people were concerned about the validity of some of these rebuttals, particularly because the accounts were created within hours of the thread. I can assure you that these were all created by members of the program and not some *one* person creating multiple accounts. However, the quickness of the responses and new account setups were due to me sending the link out. So, blame me.
 
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dv21186

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I'm not going to rehash everything that has already been said, I just want to say that I am another recent Dominican Post-Bacc grad who will be starting at a US MD program in the fall, and that I owe a great deal to the program and the people who run it.

Everything that was said was either completely made up or taken out of context. Obviously not everyone in the program is successful. If you had a bad experience and want to share it, fine. But taking anonymous, personal shots at the faculty under the disguise of educating potential students shows a complete lack of class. Paying tuition and showing up does not entitle you to attend medical school.

If you are a student considering the Dominican Post-Bacc program, realize that for every bitter, unhappy student, there are probably 10 who are totally satisfied and very grateful.
 

n3xa

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Look, I am an applicant to Dominican's postbacc program currently. I just came on this forum to see what some students think about the Post-bacc program. 2inspireU sounds a little bitter so I won't consider his account of the program as truth. But I also recognize that many of the later responses were made by sdn members who are all new members who joined in May, which seems fairly odd. Also, the times of each post seem to indicate that each account was made by one person cooking up each post to make them sound different than the last, but still praise the program.

I am just here to get some more information on the program...just the truth. I think Nexa is the only real guy to offer an accurate account.


1.) Despite the fact that I take my car to the track and have done a bit of powerlifting in the past, I was born and identify as female. :p

2.) Like I said in the previous post, you can blame me for the responses. I sent this link to a co-worker, who sent it to a fellow co-worker, and then the thread eventually went viral.

3.) Despite the fact that I am the only one in this thread with a legitimate posting history on SDN, the other responses were made by live people. Based on the initials+writing style+other info, I can figure out who they are in the program. I assure you that, at the very least, it's not one person creating multiple accounts.


That said, you are more than welcome (and anyone else) to pm me with questions. I might take a couple of days to get back to you since AMCAS/AACOMAS is opening up tomorrow.
 

Hkyplyr5

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Look, I am an applicant to Dominican's postbacc program currently. I just came on this forum to see what some students think about the Post-bacc program. 2inspireU sounds a little bitter so I won't consider his account of the program as truth. But I also recognize that many of the later responses were made by sdn members who are all new members who joined in May, which seems fairly odd. Also, the times of each post seem to indicate that each account was made by one person cooking up each post to make them sound different than the last, but still praise the program.

I am just here to get some more information on the program...just the truth. I think Nexa is the only real guy to offer an accurate account.

Illinichief,

I totally understand your apprehension with seeing posts that were newly created. As you can see from my past posts I was one who posted in a previous thread asking about this program a year ago. By chance I also went to University of Illinois as well.

I am now through one year at Dominican and could not have been happier with my decision to attend school here. Drs. Scannicchio, Hughes, and Wilson are OUTSTANDING teachers and mentors. I have had nothing but a positive experience with each of them. There is really no reason to rehash anything that has been mentioned above. To be blunt with you successful people really do not need to bash schools on a forum, and as you can see with the response from my fellow members of the program we feel very STRONGLY about the success and reputation of Dominican. N3xa is a fellow classmate of mine and I know she would provide you with any information you are looking for!

I would be happy to answer any question you may have as well and will PM you my email address!
 

illinichief89

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Do you guys know if this Post Bacc program has a pre-health committee for a letter of rec like all medical school apps talk about?

Also, what is your interaction with professors like? Are there small class sizes so you can personally get to know the professors better?

And the part of the program I am most interested in is the internship/shadowing at Rush Oak Park hospital...I wanted to know how many students get into that internship(or on the website it is listed as a class) each semester? Because I definitely need some time to observe a physician but I don't really have any connections and don't know any doctors to ask.

Thanks in advance.
 
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n3xa

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Do you guys know if this Post Bacc program has a pre-health committee for a letter of rec like all medical school apps talk about?

Also, what is your interaction with professors like? Are there small class sizes so you can personally get to know the professors better?

And the part of the program I am most interested in is the internship/shadowing at Rush Oak Park hospital...I wanted to know how many students get into that internship(or on the website it is listed as a class) each semester? Because I definitely need some time to observe a physician but I don't really have any connections and don't know any doctors to ask.

Thanks in advance.


The largest class I took was advanced anatomy and it had just under 70 people in lecture. I know and chat with professors whose classes I haven't even taken just because the campus is small and friendly.

As far as doctors to ask, this might be helpful:
http://sdnfamilyaerospace.blogspot.com/2011/03/family-aerospaces-shadowing-tips-table.html

The internship number varies because students are allowed to set up their own internships and have it approved for credit. The internship program as of now is undergoing a bit of a facelift and will most likely consist of students rotating through different departments in the hospital. Usually a hospital position is reserved for second-year PBPM students.

Best of luck to you.
 

atran017

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I’ve been watching this thread for a while and read through all comments. For the majority of the usernames, I can say that most of these individuals are real students and most of whom I studied with while I attended the DU post-baccalaureate program between 2009 and 2010. I am going to be critical about what I say and try to speak about the program instead of the professors. But first a little background about my history and DU. Originally, I entered the post-bacc program in September of 2009. I completed a total of 36 credit hours in one year equaling to 6 or so courses a semester. I obtained my certificate in one year without having to enroll in the behavioral psych course. I next decided to enroll into a special master’s program at the Chicago Med School while applying through AMCAS for the entering class of 2015. I did not feel a second year would have been beneficial (personal opinion). Thus far, I got my M.S. and several acceptances to both a US medical school and a well-known school in the UK.

So what about the comments made by the original poster? Yes, most of the examples stated in their post are true – and I know this because I sat in the classes when those comments were made. However, for those looking to apply to a post-bacc program, you need to take into consideration that these are nothing more than comments and shouldn’t detract from the overall experience. While partaking in the post-bacc program at DU, you will be taking BOTH courses that are “exclusive” to post-baccs and others where you are put in with undergraduates. You will meet and learn from a number of professors (already listed in the other posts) that have their brilliant moments. Some of these professors will have clashing personalities and others are generally liked. General feeling is that undergrads are just intimidated, since many of us already have advance level courses under out belt and others with strong research experience - but honestly, don't pay attention to that juvenile stuff... this is your opportunity to advance your career.

So let’s get down to the Pros and Cons:

Pros:

It is a “small” university, which affords an intimate atmosphere with manageable classroom sizes. You will be expected to perform well, since many already have undergraduate degrees and some with graduate level degrees. It is competitive and this serves to push you to do well - I personally like that. You will meet other students in the same shoes as you: 1) those that need academic enhancement and 2) those needing the science pre-reqs for med. This creates a little support network. You have access to an internship at local hospital networks* which is not available to most other post-bacc programs. Plus, local smaller hospitals know DU and will be receptive to volunteer opportunities – got one easily RUSH Oak Park. Anatomy lectures are supplemented with labs exclusive to post-baccs that give access to two cadavers. You have ONE physician who is a former cardiologist/internist lecturing using real life cases. Aside from his animated personality that can be offensive to some students, he is brilliant. Having spent 3+ years at a nationally recognized heart institute studying under the chief of the division, I can say Wilson knows his stuff and stays up-to-date on clinical trials/publications/procedures, etc. A committee letter is available to you upon request, and there seems to be a dedicated individual (who I am very thankful) that is there to help forward letters, AMCAS stuff…etc. in the registrar’s office. Teachers are approachable and all tend to be located in Parmer Hall. Courses were not difficult. In my case, managing time and organizing became a little hectic; although, there should be no reason why you are not getting A’s. Period. The program brought in a number of speakers ranging from nursing programs, to PA and MD programs. There will be people there with different academic goals and career aspirations, keeps things interesting. There is an MCAT prep course either from Kaplan or PR? Can’t remember, that offers a slight discount to students…. although this is nothing special – I just studied on my own for three months and did fine. The faculty is quick to help when needed. I needed a copy of my committee letter/transcript forwarded to a European med school and when the registrar person was on vacation, Dr. Hughes took care of it in less than 48hrs. I also had full support from Dr. Scannicchio (even though I went against advice) when I applied to my SMP (this included personal phone calls to that school with personal letters and connections, etc.) – so I found me experience to be enjoyable. I learned something from Adv. Physio, Pathophys, Internal Med and Bioethics….so definitely recommend those courses. Physics was on par with my previous science university, so that’s good.

Cons:

I can say with all honesty that the program started to drastically expand towards the end of my year – so more post-baccs now than when I was there. I don’t believe the screening process for entering post-baccs is as stringent as it should be. You will encounter all types of people: 1) those who are serious and want to do well, 2) those that are goofballs who had extremely poor GPAs 3) those that continue to struggle and really don’t have a realistic plan for themsleves 4) undergraduates from DU that didn’t do well and somehow managed to matriculate into the post-bacc group 5) post-baccs that don’t contribute and just mooch…etc. but that’s life – all that matters is that YOU get A’s. There will be cliques, but understand that this is a social thing and this occurs at any and every institution. The post-bacc community strives to put on outings and social events - show up and make friends, so please don’t bitch and moan about not being in a group (this isn’t highschool)…etc. I don’t particularly like the idea of having 2nd year post-baccs grade and being TAs (esp when they are friends and some maybe even dating others), but reality is, who else is going to help Profs with the grading? There are no science graduate students and my personal opinion is that most of the undergrads can barely handle their own work let alone grading…. so realistically, grading and TA positions must be filled with post-baccs. But, honestly, 90% of questions are M/C so a little hard to be biased.

Internship…being friends with last year’s internship coordinator, I saw a real struggle to find available space for students. So really, your best shot at securing an internship early is to find one yourself and have it approved by faculty (not extremely hard to do, you just need to be willing to meet with doctors and sign forms). I opted not to do an internship because it would not have been valuable to my application. Dominican University in general is not well known throughout Chicagoland and even less on a larger scale. Aside form the small suburbs of Oak Park and Forest Park, many larger institutions will not know DU post-baccs from any other small liberal arts school…This is not Bryn Mawr so don’t expect the name to get you anywhere. The school does not have any formal connections to medical or dental schools. You have a DO as a faculty who carries some word when applying to Midwestern or other DO schools.

Many of these posters on the forum were “gunners” so to speak, and I know this because I am a friend and former classmate. Our little group did well, got A’s, teachers knew us…however, you are not hearing from people who struggled, maybe weren’t as vocal…. So yes, being part of a group does impact you overall experience at DU (but this is no fault of the faculty). If you are looking to obtain good research opportunities, DU will not offer any. The amount/quality and impact of scientific/clinical research is deficient – so try to obtain other positions throughout chicagoland if you need it (i.e. I got a position at U of C). Library resources are lacking compared to other national universities. There will not be adequate access to Medline and Pubmed articles through the library…. but for the most part you won’t need it aside from making a presentation, case study, etc.

Overall, I thought my experience at DU was good. I did well and got where I wanted and have been proud to state where I did my post-bacc when asked. In addition, I found all professors to be extremely supportive my career goals and willing to help me to the best of their ability. The classes in medical school (and I know because I took all the first year ones as part of my SMP) is definitely 100% tougher in terms of material and volume than what you get at DU. But the goal in the post-bacc program isn’t to give you a medical school experience, it’s to get you into medical school. In the end, like many post-bacc programs, it’s up to YOU to make what you want of it. There are few things that I disagree with in the program and others I find commendable/postive. . I hope my input has given current applicants somewhat of an impartial view of the program. Would I recommend the program to everyone? Maybe...I think some people will benefit and others might not (see below).

My idea of what type of applicant would benefit from DU:

Individual with a mediocre GPA (2.9 – 3.2) and MCAT (25-27) looking to improve
Person who needs to retake some science courses or someone who needs all of them (career changers)
Already has good research experience for their AMCAS app
Someone in dire need of clinical experience for his or her CV (internship will help…if you get one)
Someone who enjoys the smaller school atmosphere and likes being known by professors and other students on campus
A student willing to work hard, be professional, and take advantage of what the program has to offer


PM if you have questions. Apologies for any typos or grammatical issues, just wanted to add a “quick” comment.
 

n3xa

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The MCAT program is with Princeton Review and they hold the TPR classes at either the main campus or the Priory campus, which is a few blocks away. There's also a discount.

After helping out with the internships this past academic year I will definitely agree with atran's assessment on too many kids + not enough internship spots.
 

YoungGregory

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I'm interested in this program, but most of the positive responses about Dominican are from people with one post and a couple have similar usernames.. Hmm. Don't know how I feel about that.
 

Chi1989

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How do you go about finding research, internships, and volunteer work at during the program?? I know they they offer some, so I'm curious how we can get involved with that while taking classes. I would really love to get linked to one while I'm there!
 

YoungGregory

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What did you guys' schedules look like (for career changers)? On the website it says it takes one academic year to complete, but there are no specifics. I'm guessing the track is fall-spring-summer.
 

DK12

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Chi- You sent me a PM regarding Dominican's Post Bacc- and I attempted to answer you but it says your storage inbox is full- I cannot msg you back until you empty it
 
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