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Anyone catch these articles? PM me with your e-mail address, and I'll send you the full articles:

J Gen Intern Med. 1999 Dec;14(12):730-9.

Comparison of osteopathic and allopathic medical Schools' support for primary care.

Peters AS, Clark-Chiarelli N, Block SD.

Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Helath Care, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To contrast prevailing behaviors and attitudes relative to primary care education and practice in osteopathic and allopathic medical schools. DESIGN: Descriptive study using confidential telephone interviews conducted in 1993-94. Analyses compared responses of osteopaths and allopaths, controlling for primary care orientation. SETTING: United States academic health centers. PARTICIPANTS: National stratified probability samples of first-year and fourth-year medical students, postgraduate year 2 residents, and clinical faculty in osteopathic and allopathic medical schools, a sample of allopathic deans, and a census of deans of osteopathic schools (n = 457 osteopaths; n = 2,045 allopaths). MEASUREMENTS: Survey items assessed personal characteristics, students' reasons for entering medicine, learners' primary care educational experiences, community support for primary care, and attitudes toward the clinical and academic competence of primary care physicians. MAIN RESULTS: Primary care physicians composed a larger fraction of the faculty in osteopathic schools than in allopathic schools. Members of the osteopathic community were significantly more likely than their allopathic peers to describe themselves as socioemotionally oriented rather than technoscientifically oriented. Osteopathic learners were more likely than allopathic learners to have educational experiences in primary care venues and with primary care faculty, and to receive encouragement from faculty, including specialists, to enter primary care. Attitudes toward the clinical and academic competence of prJgiary care physicians were consistently negative in both communities. Differences between communities were sustained after controlling for primary care orientation. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with allopathic schools, the cultural practices and educational structures in osteopathic medical schools better support the production of primary care physicians. However, there is a lack of alignment between attitudes and practices in the osteopathic community.

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Soc Sci Med. 2002 Dec;55(12):2141-8.

Perceptions of philosophic and practice differences between US osteopathic physicians and their allopathic counterparts.

Johnson SM, Kurtz ME.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316, USA. [email protected]

Data were gathered through a random national mail survey of 3000 US osteopathic physicians. Nine hundred and fifty-five questionnaires were usable for analysis. Through open-ended questions, osteopathic physicians identified philosophic and practice differences that distinguished them from their allopathic counterparts, and whether they believed the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT), a key identifiable feature of the osteopathic profession, was appropriate in their specialty. Seventy-five percent of the respondents to the question regarding philosophic differences answered positively, and 41 percent of the follow-up responses indicated that holistic medicine was the most distinguishing characteristic of their profession. In response to the question on practice differences, 59 percent of the respondents believed they practiced differently from allopathic physicians, and 72 percent of the follow-up responses indicated that the osteopathic approach to treatment was a primary distinguishing feature, mainly incorporating the application of OMT, a caring doctor-patient relationship, and a hands-on style. More respondents who specialized in osteopathic manipulative medicine and family practice perceived differences between them and their allopathic counterparts than did other practitioners. Almost all respondents believed OMT was an efficacious treatment, but 19 percent of all respondents felt use of OMT was inappropriate in their specialty. Thirty-one percent of the pediatricians and 38 percent of the non-primary care specialists shared this view. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents had a self-identification as osteopathic physicians, but less than half felt their patients identified them as such. When responses are considered in the context of all survey respondents (versus only those who provided open-ended responses) not a single philosophic concept or resultant practice behavior had concurrence from more than a third of the respondents as distinguishing osteopathic from allopathic medicine. Rank and file osteopathic practitioners seem to be struggling for a legitimate professional identification. The outcome of this struggle is bound to have an impact on health care delivery in the US.

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Acad Med. 2001 Aug;76(8):821-8.

Diminished use of osteopathic manipulative treatment and its impact on the uniqueness of the osteopathic profession.

Johnson SM, Kurtz ME.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, 48824-1316, USA.

PURPOSE: To determine whether osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT), a key identifiable feature of osteopathic medicine, is becoming a "lost art" in the profession, and whether the long-term evolution of osteopathic medicine into mainstream medicine and particularly specialization has had a similar impact on the use of OMT by family practitioners and specialists. METHOD: In April 1998, a two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3,000 randomly selected osteopathic physicians in the United States to assess factors affecting their use of OMT. Descriptive statistics, linear regression analyses, and analysis of variance techniques were used to test for differences. RESULTS: The response rate was 33.2%. Over 50% of the responding osteopathic physicians used OMT on less than 5% of their patients, and analysis of variance revealed OMT use was significantly affected by practice type, graduation date, and family physicians versus specialists. For specialists, 58% of the variance regression was attributed to barriers to use, practice protocol, attitudes, and training, whereas for family physicians, 43% of the variance regression was attributed to barriers to use, practice protocol, and attitudes. More important, the eventual level of OMT use was related to whether postgraduate training had been undertaken in osteopathic, allopathic, or mixed staff facilities, particularly for osteopathic specialists. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence supports the assertion that OMT is becoming a lost art among osteopathic practitioners. Osteopathic as well as allopathic medical educators and policymakers should address the impact of the diminished use of OMT on both U.S. health care and the unique identifying practices associated with the osteopathic profession.
 

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Chrisobean,

I cleaned out my inbox!



Everyone else --

Any thoughts about these articles?
 
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DocWagner

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Personally I see the use of OMT as being MUCH MUCH MORE than simple manipulation!! A narrowed definition will produce poor results.

Osteopathic philosophy and practice may lead one to refer to PT earlier than allopathic counterparts...or to encourage movement post-op in a timely manner! How is "getting up out of bed to encourage the passing of flatus" different than " the placement of hands on the abdomen to promote visceral manipulation for flatus production" different???
Get my point?

I see the graying of the lines between Osteopathic Medicine and Allopathic Medicine more of the uptake of MD's to the DO way of thinking!!
It is quite clear that only 20 years ago, MD's were very reductionist in thinking...while today, openness to movement therapies/body-mind-health connections are in EVERY aspect of hospital care!!

I certainly don't see the Osteopathic Philosophy as disappearing...more like catching on!

I certainly don't need to "rack and crack" to practice OMT!!!
 

NotShorty

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My only concern about the blurring of the lines between MD and DO is that perhaps someday there really WILL be no difference, except that osteopathic schools are the one that are "easier" to get into.

The implications of that... I dunno. This is just my initial thought.:idea:

-NS
 

Robz

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Originally posted by NotShorty
My only concern about the blurring of the lines between MD and DO is that perhaps someday there really WILL be no difference, except that osteopathic schools are the one that are "easier" to get into.

The implications of that... I dunno. This is just my initial thought.:idea:

-NS

Unless research is completed to show the scientific world hard evidence I would imagine that it would drift toward little to no difference. In fact during my shadows I really did not see ANY difference other than having that tool in their toolbox...even if they did not use it.
 

Chrisobean

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i just read the Johnson/Kurtz article... and now you are all going to hear my thoughts!

first off, the article speaks of a DO identity crisis. i think that is an unnecessarily strong statement. the authors state how osteopathic medicine is becoming similar to allopathic medicine, based on the survey answers. first off, this implies that allopathic medicine is "the way it should be", which is wack!
initially, osteopathy was vastly different, going for the drugless approach. but do you know what kinds of 'medicine' the allopaths used back then? all chemicals, that usually made you sicker. if it made your heart race, your blood was circulating faster and being filtered quicker; if it made you vomit or sweat, you were purging out the bad stuff. obviously they had no clue what these
'medicines' were doing to the body, and were just going on physical symptoms. osteopathy was against all this, realizing that your body did a pretty good job of keeping itself in check. i think AT Still was way ahead of his time. but enough with the history lesson.
the article says DOs are losing their professional identity and prestige. i think this is the result of the AOA. they are trying so hard to maintain their distinction from the allopathic world, when in reality there is none. by promoting this philosophy, i think they are focusing too much on whats "different", and the public doesnt understand that the actual differences are nil. i understand where they may be coming from, since they have fought long and hard for their standing. for the fact that OMT is being practiced less, it is. how is a radiologist going to give OMT to his patient? i think this is a result of more doctors going into specialties, especially allo ones. i mean, they are training with MDs who never use OMT, so how are they going to learn how to use it in a real patient setting? i really dont think it has a place in ALL medical fields. i think it would be difficult for a pediatrician to use it, and they surveyed a hell of alot of them.

but really, in our world, how many different ways can there be to practice medicine? DOs and MDs know the same physiology and pathology and everything else, and all our bodies work pretty much the same way... we know that we need meds to cure some diseases...

the last line of the article says "... as these 2 professions continue to assimilate the best the other has to offer." why is that such a negative thing?????

i bet this wasnt too coherent, and i probably didnt explain myself well. im definitely not DO bashing. but i think the authors state these facts so negatively, when i dont think they are at all.
 

mmapcpro

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When some people hear the term "holistic", they think of hippies with crystals and candles, chanting and holding hands while naked in the woods.

When they hear the term "holistic" being associated with a physician, they suspect quackery. This is enforced when they see television shows like Seinfeld where they go to a "holistic" doctor and the guy is a total freak.

I'd like to see a different term associated with osteopaths than "holistic", because the "fairytales/dragons/witches/quija boards/hippie" stigma is so tightly bound to it.
 

calcrew14

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Originally posted by Chrisobean
i think AT Still was way ahead of his time. but enough with the history lesson.

Wait one more question please! Does anybody know how osteopathic community reacted to each major medical breakthrough such as the discovery of penicillin, the invention of polio vaccines.............etc ?
 

DORoe

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Wait one more question please! Does anybody know how osteopathic community reacted to each major medical breakthrough such as the discovery of penicillin, the invention of polio vaccines.............etc ?

Check out the book "The D.O.'s Osteopathic Medicine in America" It's all in there my friend.
 

calcrew14

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Originally posted by DORoe
Check out the book "The D.O.'s Osteopathic Medicine in America" It's all in there my friend.

Goog grief! Short cut is so difficult to find these days, isn't it? I am just gonna have to rewind my crystal ball a little bit then. But I am not going to tell you what I see though. :D

So far it has been working so best. In spite of those risky endeavors for noble reasons, my heroes were smart enough to stay with all the promising trends in medicine. And I neither have to retake any MCAT nor deal with those minuscoms too long.
:smuggrin: :clap: :thumbup: :hardy:
 

Goofyone

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Originally posted by DocWagner
Personally I see the use of OMT as being MUCH MUCH MORE than simple manipulation!! A narrowed definition will produce poor results.

Osteopathic philosophy and practice may lead one to refer to PT earlier than allopathic counterparts...or to encourage movement post-op in a timely manner! How is "getting up out of bed to encourage the passing of flatus" different than " the placement of hands on the abdomen to promote visceral manipulation for flatus production" different???
Get my point?

I see the graying of the lines between Osteopathic Medicine and Allopathic Medicine more of the uptake of MD's to the DO way of thinking!!
It is quite clear that only 20 years ago, MD's were very reductionist in thinking...while today, openness to movement therapies/body-mind-health connections are in EVERY aspect of hospital care!!

I certainly don't see the Osteopathic Philosophy as disappearing...more like catching on!

I certainly don't need to "rack and crack" to practice OMT!!!

I hear what you're saying Doc. I totally agree. I don't see what the big deal is.

I've asked this question before, and I'll pose it to you all again: why can't two virtually identical types of medical education coexist?

There are multiple telephone companies to choose from. Whether you use sprint, MCI or whatever. What's the difference? Who cares? In fact, the companies have to compete with each other, which results in a better service!

What's the big deal if there is no difference between MDs and DOs, as long as we are all "doing it right?"

And don't give me any crap about there being too many doctors in this country, because 26% of all allopathic residency positions are held by FMGs.

If we admit that the benefits of manipulation are overstated, what are the consequences of that? Are the 20 osteopathic medical schools just going to vanish into thin air?

Perhaps I just don't "get it." Maybe someone can explain it to me. What is everyone so afraid of?
 

DireWolf

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Originally posted by Goofyone
I hear what you're saying Doc. I totally agree. I don't see what the big deal is.

I've asked this question before, and I'll pose it to you all again: why can't two virtually identical types of medical education coexist?

What's the big deal if there is no difference between MDs and DOs, as long as we are all "doing it right?"

If we admit that the benefits of manipulation are overstated, what are the consequences of that? Are the 20 osteopathic medical schools just going to vanish into thin air?

Perhaps I just don't "get it." Maybe someone can explain it to me. What is everyone so afraid of?

Relax. You get it. It's some of the insecure diehard types that don't get it.
 
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