DPM or nursing?

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DrShoegal

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I've been accepted to both DPM and an accelerated BSN program. I graduated with a BA in 2010. If I go the BSN route, I am interested in pursuing CRNA or NP but I have heard it is very difficult to get accepted into those programs. I am leaning towards DPM, but I am worried about the future of the profession.. decreasing reimbursement rates, and I would love to open my own practice but a few doctors that I've shadowed said it is getting more and more difficult to keep up with the expenses and more are going towards group practice, hospital settings. I am also worried about malpractice and the possibility of getting sued whereas in nursing you are basically covered. I know they are 2 completely different fields and I don't know if I could see myself being a nurse but I would love to become a NP but if I couldn't get accepted to a program I think I would regret not going to pod school. I am in my mid twenties and sometimes I dread the fact that I will be in school for 4 years plus 3 years of residency compared to the BSN program that is only 11 months..I really don't know what career to choose..Like I said I am leaning towards podiatry but nursing would be nice since it would only take me a year but I am worried I will regret not becoming a doctor. Also, the podiatrist I am shadowing really doesn't know if she would go through with podiatry again if she had the chance so that also worries me..Any suggestions are great! I am down to 1 week to decide! Thanks in advance
 

billBOB213

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How many shadowing hours have you put in with each field? I would shadow like crazy right now to see what you like better and choose that way. I wouldn't sweat the DPM who isn't sure she would do it again, you will get that in any field as there is always a 'grass is greener' scenario.
 

DrShoegal

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I have shadowed 3 podiatrists for about 3 years but I haven't shadowed anyone in the nursing profession. I will try to get a few hours in this week. I have always been interested in podiatry but I had to take a few years off after getting my bachelors and now since I have gotten older, sometimes I dread the fact of spending 7 years in school, being in debt, and waiting to have a family. I am only in my twenties but sometimes I think I should go with nursing so I can start making money sooner But I feel like I will regret my decision in the future. I am also worried about the future of medicine and to me it looks like nursing is going to be stronger in the future and more in demand. Will there always be a demand for podiatry and good jobs?
 

Ferocity

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It was a very difficult choice for me when I was looking at podiatry. At first, I was thinking that I could never pick something like podiatry. However, I eventually convinced myself to go through with it, even against the advice of others. You see, at first I thought it would be impossible for me to separate work from pleasure, but eventually I told myself that I would not let any fetish get in the way of my professional life. It's difficult, let me tell you. Sometimes I'll look at a foot and I'll be like:

6312924-brown-and-tan-pomeranian-puppy-licking-lips--seven-months-old.jpg


But then I snap back into it and realize that I am here to cure, not just to admire.

Well, that's my story.

Good luck in your future endeavors!
 

billBOB213

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I have shadowed 3 podiatrists for about 3 years but I haven't shadowed anyone in the nursing profession. I will try to get a few hours in this week. I have always been interested in podiatry but I had to take a few years off after getting my bachelors and now since I have gotten older, sometimes I dread the fact of spending 7 years in school, being in debt, and waiting to have a family. I am only in my twenties but sometimes I think I should go with nursing so I can start making money sooner But I feel like I will regret my decision in the future. I am also worried about the future of medicine and to me it looks like nursing is going to be stronger in the future and more in demand. Will there always be a demand for podiatry and good jobs?

Ya I hear you on not wanting to make a bad decision and regret it in the future. I am in my lower 30's with wife/2kids so I wish I would have done this sooner. In 2006 I was going to apply to pod school and I talked to a DPM that eventually talked me out of it. He told me to go into business, that you can make a ton and medicine will be socialized soon and will be ruined (grass is greener). This DPM has been practicing over 25 years and he told me things arent like they used to be. Well of course they arent! and the same thing goes for business, things ARE different. Nothing is for sure in business, and older business owners will say the same thing, things arent what they used to be.
I dreaded 7 years of not making much money so I 'took the money' in a sense by taking a decent paying (not as fulfilling or interesting) job. But I want to be a podiatrist at the end of the day. No amount of money will compensate for you not loving your job and THAT is my main motivator now going back to school. Will it be harder now than if I just bit the bullet and did it 7 years ago, sure. But I would rather take a couple steps back and get in a career that I will love than to be miserable for 50 hours a week while making decent money. Just my 2 cents. I don't want to be like a lot of people who are working in a job they don't like so they can earn enough money to retire one day. They seems so backwards to me, work at something you enjoy now and save for retirement.
I still think medicine will be fine and doctors will make good money. We invest alot, time and money, during the 4 years of school and 3 years of residency but the returns will be great too. Good luck in your choice between the 2 careers though.
 

Ferocity

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I'd say nursing. Here's why: It's an advancing profession, you can now get your clinical doctorate as opposed to your masters. 25 states allow you to practice independently, this scope will likely expand over the next 4 years. 1 year BSN, it's quick, little to no debt, vast opportunities after, and again, room for advancement (NP, CRNA, CNS). I even heard NP's are coming out with residencies in emergency med and even surgical specialties and your paid comparable to a physician resident, around 50k, a great need for men in nursing, so getting a job will be easy. However this is just my opinion, you have to decide. When you factor total costs for a medical education, including everything, it's about 50k per yr x4, that's 200k loans. Plus Interest between 7-8%. So your looking at about 250-300k debt total upon graduation. You will make a decent income as a podiatrist however no1 knows how obamacare will effect medicine in the near future. I've heard both arguments made. You really need to decide whats best for you. I was pre-pod before but switched out. Im planning to do DPT or DNP route. I have heard getting into a crna program isnt easy, NP is more easier to get into. However, remember with a decent gpa, id say 3.3+, and having 2+ years as a RN, you should have no problem getting into a graduate nursing program. O one last thing thats important. Your required to do a 3 year surgical residency after pod school. Meaning you have to like doing surgery, as in cutting bones, ect..this is an essential function of a podiatrist and that's how u make most of your income.

I wouldn't trust anybody that doesn't understand the difference between your and you're.
 

Robert De Niro

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I'd say nursing. Here's why: It's an advancing profession, you can now get your clinical doctorate as opposed to your masters. 25 states allow you to practice independently, this scope will likely expand over the next 4 years. 1 year BSN, it's quick, little to no debt, vast opportunities after, and again, room for advancement (NP, CRNA, CNS). I even heard NP's are coming out with residencies in emergency med and even surgical specialties and your paid comparable to a physician resident, around 50k, a great need for men in nursing, so getting a job will be easy. However this is just my opinion, you have to decide. When you factor total costs for a medical education, including everything, it's about 50k per yr x4, that's 200k loans. Plus Interest between 7-8%. So your looking at about 250-300k debt total upon graduation. You will make a decent income as a podiatrist however no1 knows how obamacare will effect medicine in the near future. I've heard both arguments made. You really need to decide whats best for you. I was pre-pod before but switched out. Im planning to do DPT or DNP route. I have heard getting into a crna program isnt easy, NP is more easier to get into. However, remember with a decent gpa, id say 3.3+, and having 2+ years as a RN, you should have no problem getting into a graduate nursing program. O one last thing thats important. Your required to do a 3 year surgical residency after pod school. Meaning you have to like doing surgery, as in cutting bones, ect..this is an essential function of a podiatrist and that's how u make most of your income.

Wow dudestheman pops up after weeks of silence as soon as someone else asks for help deciding between podiatry and another field, this time nursing... Shocking!
 

EK18

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Nursing is advancing rapidly but so is podiatry. Only 5 states still bar Podiatrists from treating the ankle (Kansas, Alabama, Missisippi, South Carolina, and Massachusetts). New York law will allow Podiatrists the ankle starting next year. Starting this year, all podiatric residencies must be a minimum of 3 years. Meaning you should leave residency as a highly trained physician of the foot and ankle.

There will be a demand for nurses and for podiatrists in the future. You will do well in either one of these careers (provided you put in the work). Ultimately, you need to decide whether you want to be a physician/surgeon of the lower extremity or a nurse practitioner for the rest of your life. Shadow both and find out what you can see yourself doing.
 

pacpod

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There will be a demand for nurses and for podiatrists in the future. You will do well in either one of these careers (provided you put in the work). Ultimately, you need to decide whether you want to be a physician/surgeon of the lower extremity or a nurse practitioner for the rest of your life. Shadow both and find out what you can see yourself doing.

DrShoegal,

Ultimately, shadowing will give you a much better idea than a bunch of SDN'ers you have never met personally. ;) (Although we are all more than happy to share our opinions)

This will be your career. Take the time to invest in shadowing to see what you truly want to do. If you are this torn between career paths (both are great) 1 week out from needing to make a decision, maybe you should consider deferring admission to each for a year and put in the grunt work to know for sure.

To address the OP's concern about not being a doctor, I wouldn't pick podiatry just to get "Dr." in front of your name, it absolutely will not be worth it if you are unhappy with the career. If nursing is truly what you want to do, then go for it. Don't worry about what is in front or behind your name.

I wish you the best of luck in your decision.
 
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Cascade11

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No one can tell what the future of medicine will be with Obamacare. That goes for podiatrists, nurses and all the rest. People speculate and give examples of other countries but we just have to see it through. I just hope docs won't get screwed too much. In your case, I would see how young nurses are doing and decide if the job is something you can live with. If not, then podiatry is your future. Work through the process of elimination.
 

DrShoegal

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Thank you all for your opinions. Right now I am making a list of the pros and cons of each..podiatry is winning by a small margin. I really could see myself being a DPM I just think about the what ifs..like getting sued or messing up a surgical procedure but the doctors ive shadowed have all told me to develop a good relationship with the patients and you have the option of not performing a certain procedure. Thoughts? With nursing, I dont really know if I could see myself being an RN if I dont get into CRna or NP. I also like the hours of podiatry (less to no call compared to nursing). I'd appreciate more advice ;-) thanks again

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whg342

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lol I was waiting for dudestheman90 to pop up...

to the OP: have you considered applying straight for NP programs? A lot of schools offer combined programs that give you a BSN, as well as a NP after 3 years.NP programs are significantly easier to get into than CRNA programs. I was also considering the NP route during my Junior year of undergrad -- but after shadowing a couple of NPs, I realized it just wasn't something I felt very strongly about. I definitely recommend shadowing a couple of NPs and seeing what their day to day is like before you commit to the BSN.

Good luck!
 

shenanigans327

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Thank you all for your opinions. Right now I am making a list of the pros and cons of each..podiatry is winning by a small margin. I really could see myself being a DPM I just think about the what ifs..like getting sued or messing up a surgical procedure but the doctors ive shadowed have all told me to develop a good relationship with the patients and you have the option of not performing a certain procedure. Thoughts? With nursing, I dont really know if I could see myself being an RN if I dont get into CRna or NP. I also like the hours of podiatry (less to no call compared to nursing). I'd appreciate more advice ;-) thanks again

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http://money.cnn.com/gallery/news/economy/2013/01/14/nursing-jobs-grads/?iid=HP_LN&hpt=hp_t1
 

Ferocity

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I just heard about this article. Yes the economy is taking it's toll on the healthcare system. I have a friend who's a dental hygienist that tells me business is slow and the dents end up taking her patients so they can pay her less. This is the same for the technology/IT sector as well as a host of other professions. In regards to nursing this is very cyclical, since RN's aren't retiring due to the economic uncertainty, new grads are having a harder time finding a job. However with obamacare in 2014 adding 30-50 million patients and as time progresses, nurses will retire again, things will slowly turn back to normal over the next couple of years. There is indeed a shortage of nurses but it's very expensive to hire and train Rn's...costs btwn 50-80k for a hospital to add a new grad. However the abundance of jobs and opportunities it still makes it a viable career choice. I have done many internet searches on line and find less than 10 pod jobs available. When I search RN i find over 7,000 postings nation wide. Being a male will also give you some leverage in the job market. Pod is a good field choice if your comfortable with doing with surgery. Also may i add, podiatry faces a residency shortage, i know 3 different ppl that didn't match last year.

No you don't.
 
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zdlamkin8195

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In 7 years you'll either be a DPM or CRNA/NP so the decision based off of money/saving time in the here and now could be very disappointing then. Do what you want to do. Period.
 

rushrhees

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like getting sued or messing up a surgical procedure but the doctors ive shadowed have all told me to develop a good relationship with the patients and you have the option of not performing a certain procedure. Thoughts? With nursing, I dont really know if I could see myself being an RN if I dont get into CRna or NP. I also like the hours of podiatry (less to no call compared to nursing). I'd appreciate more advice ;-) thanks again

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Do consider though if you cause enough of a mistake as a DNP or CRNA, while not as bad a a physician it can be a career killer. When you apply to other jobs and have to explain why you left the first will be tricky.
"I could see myself being an RN if I dont get into CRna or NP"
Also these programs are becoming harder and harder to get into, there are tons of RNs who want that salary, but many programs only seat 30 or so a year. The competitiveness is getting harder in that.
I am in the same boat. While I like DPM, I do think DNP, PA are going to be very secure jobs in the future as there will be more reliance on para health professionals as the years go on. I know my parents are strongly pushing me that route (they got kind of pissed when I told them about my first interview at DMU, now I just say I am business trips).
I am going DPM as it is an acceptance I have in, while nursing would be clawing my way in starting at the community college, even that is no guarantee as they get 1000 applicants for 150 seats.
 

Life Sucks

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Well to be honest, no one can tell you what your dream is. I was leaning for nusing, but I feel like nursing isn't right for me. But Podiatry and Dentistry interest me because of the notion of actually being your own boss.
.
Want a doctor title, be a Pod.
Like pans and being a less authority and resposibility, be a nurse.
Like stockings, heels, and fetishes, be a Pod.;p
Want to do surgery, be a Pod.
Both are sort of dissed in the medical community, but both are important.
 

Life Sucks

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Also, the dude, wtf are you blabbing on about. The healthcare industy is doing outstanding. Out of all the career pathways I want to be in , HC is the only on that's just making it.
 

EK18

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I know my parents are strongly pushing me that route (they got kind of pissed when I told them about my first interview at DMU, now I just say I am business trips).

I know that feel bro.
 

HopefulSpartan

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I have done many internet searches on line and find less than 10 pod jobs available. When I search RN i find over 7,000 postings nation wide.

I recommend keeping a bag of rock salt next to you handy while reading dudes entire post.

This point in particular is ridiculous..it may be 2013 but internet searches are not how the majority of physicians find employment.
 

rushrhees

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On Indeed.com I am seeing about 500 openings, plus all the openings that are by networking, plus factor in all the baby boomers that are going to be retiring in the 7 years it will take to become an attending.
 

Robert De Niro

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On Indeed.com I am seeing about 500 openings, plus all the openings that are by networking, plus factor in all the baby boomers that are going to be retiring in the 7 years it will take to become an attending.

:thumbup:
 
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ucfgrad10

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On Indeed.com I am seeing about 500 openings, plus all the openings that are by networking, plus factor in all the baby boomers that are going to be retiring in the 7 years it will take to become an attending.

My hero
 

PADPM

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Both are sort of dissed in the medical community, but both are important.

WTF are you talking about. I've been in the "medical community" for well over 20 years, including staff/surgical privileges at many hospitals. My group obtains referrals on a regular basis in the office and in the hospital (consults) from internists, hospitalists, orthopedics, vascular surgery, infectious disease, the ER, so I don't believe pods are "dissed" in the medical community.

And I have NEVER encountered ANYONE in the "medical community" who dissed nurses.
 

billBOB213

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PaDPM comin stroooong, I like that. We appreciate your insights being that you have walked the walk and are actually 'in the game'. I am sure Life Sucks didnt mean to tick you off, but still is good to here from a DPm on these threads....
 

darklabel

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I just heard about this article. Yes the economy is taking it's toll on the healthcare system. I have a friend who's a dental hygienist that tells me business is slow and the dents end up taking her patients so they can pay her less. This is the same for the technology/IT sector as well as a host of other professions. In regards to nursing this is very cyclical, since RN's aren't retiring due to the economic uncertainty, new grads are having a harder time finding a job. However with obamacare in 2014 adding 30-50 million patients and as time progresses, nurses will retire again, things will slowly turn back to normal over the next couple of years. There is indeed a shortage of nurses but it's very expensive to hire and train Rn's...costs btwn 50-80k for a hospital to add a new grad. However the abundance of jobs and opportunities it still makes it a viable career choice. I have done many internet searches on line and find less than 10 pod jobs available. When I search RN i find over 7,000 postings nation wide. Being a male will also give you some leverage in the job market. Pod is a good field choice if your comfortable with doing with surgery. Also may i add, podiatry faces a residency shortage, i know 3 different ppl that didn't match last year.

Not sure you realize, but unless your area has a shortage (middle of no where, poor urban area), nursing is currently saturated. The problem is that programs such as Keizer "University" and other b.s. programs saturate the market with A.S.N.'s thus keeping unemployment high. Speaking to a good friend of mine who recently passed her N-CLEX and graduated from a great university, she says she's been trying to find a job in her home town but everywhere has a minimum of 1 year experience required since as you said, they are hard to train. NPs are even worse and most have to fall back on their RNs to get a job in the hospital. This is all anecdotal so take it as a grain of salt, but just be aware.

5 years ago they said nursing employment can only go up and they also said we'd have 5% GDP growth right around now. Funny how life works..

DPM only has the issue of residency (which according to those who experienced it says its exaggerated, but I don't really know). The supply of DPMs is low and the demand is there. 10 years from now, I don't think the number of DPM schools will inc or that diabetes will dec, so you will definitely have a nice paying job and autonomy.

WTF are you talking about. I've been in the "medical community" for well over 20 years, including staff/surgical privileges at many hospitals. My group obtains referrals on a regular basis in the office and in the hospital (consults) from internists, hospitalists, orthopedics, vascular surgery, infectious disease, the ER, so I don't believe pods are "dissed" in the medical community.

And I have NEVER encountered ANYONE in the "medical community" who dissed nurses.

Just a troll. As a volunteer and in my shadowing I've seen DPM, DO and MDs in the hospital and I can also attest that they all have nothing but respect for each other. And if you screw your nurse prepare for one hellish work environment...:smuggrin:
 

PADPM

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Not sure you realize, but unless your area has a shortage (middle of no where, poor urban area), nursing is currently saturated. The problem is that programs such as Keizer "University" and other b.s. programs saturate the market with A.S.N.'s thus keeping unemployment high. Speaking to a good friend of mine who recently passed her N-CLEX and graduated from a great university, she says she's been trying to find a job in her home town but everywhere has a minimum of 1 year experience required since as you said, they are hard to train. NPs are even worse and most have to fall back on their RNs to get a job in the hospital. This is all anecdotal so take it as a grain of salt, but just be aware.

5 years ago they said nursing employment can only go up and they also said we'd have 5% GDP growth right around now. Funny how life works..

DPM only has the issue of residency (which according to those who experienced it says its exaggerated, but I don't really know). The supply of DPMs is low and the demand is there. 10 years from now, I don't think the number of DPM schools will inc or that diabetes will dec, so you will definitely have a nice paying job and autonomy.



Just a troll. As a volunteer and in my shadowing I've seen DPM, DO and MDs in the hospital and I can also attest that they all have nothing but respect for each other. And if you screw your nurse prepare for one hellish work environment...:smuggrin:


:thumbup::thumbup:
 

DrShoegal

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Thank you all for the advice and suggestions. I am most likely going to follow through with podiatry. I love every aspect of the profession and could see myself being a podiatrist. I've enjoyed every minute of shadowing. I was only really interested in nursing because of becoming a CRNA but after researching it more, it would take me atleast 5-6 years to finish schooling and that was the issue with pod school I had so I can't let that be an issue. If I couldn't get accepted to CRNA or even NP, then I know I wouldn't be happy just being a nurse. I have a lot of respect for them though. I'm the type of person who always wants more and I like being "my own boss" :) I am ready for the challenge and can't wait to start!
Thanks!
 

darklabel

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Thank you all for the advice and suggestions. I am most likely going to follow through with podiatry. I love every aspect of the profession and could see myself being a podiatrist. I've enjoyed every minute of shadowing. I was only really interested in nursing because of becoming a CRNA but after researching it more, it would take me atleast 5-6 years to finish schooling and that was the issue with pod school I had so I can't let that be an issue. If I couldn't get accepted to CRNA or even NP, then I know I wouldn't be happy just being a nurse. I have a lot of respect for them though. I'm the type of person who always wants more and I like being "my own boss" :) I am ready for the challenge and can't wait to start!
Thanks!

Definitely won't regret it kiddo :thumbup:.
 

Ferocity

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Thank you all for the advice and suggestions. I am most likely going to follow through with podiatry. I love every aspect of the profession and could see myself being a podiatrist. I've enjoyed every minute of shadowing. I was only really interested in nursing because of becoming a CRNA but after researching it more, it would take me atleast 5-6 years to finish schooling and that was the issue with pod school I had so I can't let that be an issue. If I couldn't get accepted to CRNA or even NP, then I know I wouldn't be happy just being a nurse. I have a lot of respect for them though. I'm the type of person who always wants more and I like being "my own boss" :) I am ready for the challenge and can't wait to start!
Thanks!

Excellent choice, feet are the most delicious part of the whole body!
 

PennDippody

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This is a no-brainer. Nurses and attending pods have completely different roles in the hospital. Considering both at the same time is a bit perplexing to me. The DPM is just like any other specialty in medicine in many ways. The ancillary staff (RN's etc) and mid-levels (NP, PA et al) are there to supplement the work load and keep things flowing, They are very helpful and have their own responsibilities in the hospital environment but they are not attendings. They don't have the same function as podiatrists or otherwise. If you want to diagnose and treat pts, podiatry is one way to do so. If you want to do surgery in a field that will always have niche, podiatry can facilitate this. And as for pay, pods beat the others out any day of the week. The aging/diabetic population will always be in need of podiatrists for both wound care and for surgical needs. Referral bases are not hard to develop for surgery consults either. Additionally, if surgery is something you feel you really want to do and, either other opportunities to do so have eluded you or you are in a timeline crunch, podiatry can be a very rewarding alternative to the MD/DO route. I can only speak for Texas but podiatrists do just fine here and podiatry services in hospitals are common.

As for pay and job opportunities they are there - just get away from the pod-saturated northeast. I'll share 3 of 9 instances I know of that I think illustrate this.

My wife is 1 of 9 graduating podiatry residents in 2 sister programs (3-year) in a large Texas city. I'm not sure how these programs compare to others but I can say she was in the OR nearly every week day, took call for 30-day spans, and worked pretty much every day her first year while gradually getting more time off up unlit now.

One of the three residents I'll tell you about got an offer (and took it) for 230k with benefits (one of which being that the group would match up to $30K into his 401K) - making his potential gross over $250K. It is, however, located in Montana so there's that.

A second will be joining a group (Waco Foot and Ankle) starting at 120K on a 6-year partner track and will be in the heart of Austin, TX.

My wife (and my final example) will be joining her attending's in-hospital surgical practice with an agreement to buy it from him in the near future (he is late 50's and looking to retire). She'll also be starting around 120K but with plans to take majority stake in the practice by late 2014.


I think the other postings on shadowing should really be considered. Once you see the different roles each have in the hospital (the disparity can lessen in clinic but still...) you will see that you are really considering two totally different professions. Personally, because I would like to have greater medical responsibility in the hospital environment and would also like surgery to be on the table for future options, I'd go podiatry (as if it wasn't obvious guess).
 
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zdlamkin8195

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And the best podiatry forum post of the year goes to....Penn Dippody! Lol
 
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