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Dual Degree @ Barry?

Discussion in 'Podiatry Students' started by iheartnj, Mar 9, 2007.

  1. iheartnj

    iheartnj Guest

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    I was wondering if anyone has heard about Barry implementing a MD program, in addition to the DPM program (i.e. graduating with MD/DPM degree). Apparently a couple of people I've spoken to also heard this rumor @ various national conferences...

    Anyone?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    There is a dual degree with a DO program but I know nothing about an MD program.
     
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  3. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member
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    I sure haven't heard anything about it either.^

    Barry just has DPM+MBA or DPM+MPH right now which are available to qualified students at an additional cost (but significantly discounted). Students who complete the first four semesters of the DPM program with good grades and already had a bachelor's degree also have the option of paying $25 to take a comprehensive test and get a MS in biomedical sciences upon passing it. That's a nice touch because Barry has a SMP, and pods have done all of that coursework - and then some - by the end of basic sciences.

    As mentioned, what OP is referring to might be the DPM/DO program at Nova Southeastern University... a few miles from Barry. It's a newer program I don't know a whole lot about; the first entrants have not finished yet. My basic conclusion just from reading the blurb about it was that you sacrafice a good sized chunk of your pod residency and spend a bunch more $ just to do a bare minimum DO residency. I'd probably just prefer to do a PMS-36 and be highly trained in podiatry - especially advanced aspects of wound care and surgery. It could be a decent option for strong DPM students who desire to do mainly primary care podiatry and have the extra time and $ to spend, though; see what you think...
    http://www.podiatryonline.com/main.cfm?pg=students&fn=nova
     
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  4. busupshot83

    busupshot83 S.D.N. Vet
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    With Nova offering this unique program, and DPM students sharing classes with DO students at some schools, does this point to greater recognition of Podiatry amongst health professions?
     
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  5. flaftdoc529

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    There is no DPM/MD program in Barry. But the DPM/DO program will definately benefit Barry. I don't know much about the program but I believe only a couple of people that are selected into the program and it's pretty expensive addition to the tuition=more loans.
     
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  6. JEWmongous

    JEWmongous Member
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    At the NOVA program, you must previously complete a 2 year PM and S residency. If you have completed a 3 year (or 4 year) residency, then I believe you are not eligible.

    Honestly, I'd rather do a 3 year residency then maybe a fellowship. I do not exactly see the point of a DPM/DO program. However, having the basic sciences with the DO or MD students I think is great.
     
  7. busupshot83

    busupshot83 S.D.N. Vet
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    Isn't podiatry working towards eliminating the 2-year residency? If so, what would happen to Nova's program? Making the program eligible for 3-year residencey graduates would have made more sense.
     
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  8. Stafocker

    Stafocker DPM=Foot Ankle Authority
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    the NOVA program took a resident from the DVA-Atlanta program (i was an extern at the time, he was a vietnamese guy, forgot his name) as their first "class' for the DO/DPM candidate.

    According to his fellow residents, you return to school for 3 more years.. the kicker is that you DON"T have to take any more entrance exams or need GPA requirements. However, you NEED to be a florida resident, they may have changed that, but at the time (2006), that was why the dude left. You would do 1 year of classes that DPM school doesn't provide, Behavorial Sciences, Genetics, etc, and then do ALL the required Shelf with EXAM at the end. So you basically go through school again AFTER you've entered residency without having to take the MCAT again and do DO school in 3 years instead of 4.

    I think they have a website you can get this info from.
     
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  9. Buspar

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    Barry do not a DPM/DO program
     
  10. Dr. Agape

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  11. EuroPhysician

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    NSU has a DO program aimed at Podiatrists, what is the issue with this? Isn't a Podiatry good enough for one to make a good living?
     
  12. 165007

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    that is the most ignorant question I have seen all day.
    you're joking right?
     
  13. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member
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    There might always be pods who deep down really wanted to be prescribing ACE inhibitors, listening to lungs, and doing DREs. I'm not one, but maybe you are...

    The idea of the NSU program is just to make its grads into a pod a bit less of a specialist and a bit more of a general physician. As you see in the Nova program outline, you lose a fair amount of pod residency in exchange for more gen med rotations and the bare minimum DO stuff, but it clearly states that you will still be a lower extremity specialist. I think that having both the DPM and DO degrees would make you more marketable to a hospital or multispecialty group, and having a few of the DPM/DOs out there in a few years is probably good for podiatry's image as part of the health care team. However, I sure wouldn't want to give a lot of pod surgical training just to be able to manage systemic disease a bit more comprehensively. Prescribing the glipizide and HCTZ might be fun for some, but I'd rather be competent doing calc fractures and PCDOs. You'd have to lose in one area to gain in another...

    To answer the question about podiatry being "good enough": Yes, you can do very well in pod. Shadow some DPMs with good training and hard work, and you will clearly see that.
     
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  14. Corrupt200

    Corrupt200 Member
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    I think it will be good for those who want to use OMM to treat some of the disorders of the lower extremities.
     
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  15. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member
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    Or you could probably just read a book on OMM and save yourself 4yrs of hard work and lost income? :D
     
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  16. cool_vkb

    cool_vkb Member
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    In US, some DDS do a 7 yr residency program to get their Oral-maxillofacial surgery & MD degree. They wont even be using that MD degree. Is dentistry not good enough now? Just dont start blabbering or typing without knowing the entire background of the story. first do a research on the DO-DPM program, know what are its objectives,etc stuff and then start writing.
     
  17. dpmPOD

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    I don't see the point of such a degree either.
     
  18. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member
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    There are people out there with inferiority complexes that this program is aimed at (IMO).

    The course/program is a money maker for the program/institution and they are aiming the program at those people who think that DPM is not enough.

    It is great that you do not think that such a degree is necessary. This means that you will be secure with a DPM.
     
  19. Osteodog

    Osteodog DO, DPM
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    Being uniquely qualified to answer this question, I agree that there would be no point to having both degrees. I am a DPM and will be a DO in 3 weeks.

    This dual degree question was being discussed when I was in pod school in 1994. I do not intend to sound inflammatory and this is just my opinion, but the ONLY reason that this idea even exists is because of the not-so-secret yearnings of many pod students to be MD's or DO's. I think you would be hard-pressed to find an MD or DO who would want to quit and go get their DPM. Again, IMHO, I think it's just a back door way for a DPM student to be an MD or DO.

    What would be the point of having both degrees? If you want to do foot and ankle ortho, just be an ortho sub-specialist. Why on earth would you want to waste the time and money to learn a VERY narrow set of skills in podiatry that you couldn't learn as an MD/DO?? Truthfully, there is no reason.
     
  20. spo01

    spo01 Member
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    i notice you pull the 'i'm not trying to sound inflammatory this is just my opinion...' remark a lot. but you are inflammatory and your opinion has little meaning to this forum because you are incredibly bitter, ignorant, and have openly stated that you never wanted to be a podiatrist in the first place and had always wanted to be a DO/MD. you stated you couldn't get into an MD/DO school so you settled for podiatry, my question is why in the world do you think you would be happy doing something you never wanted to do?! quit taking out your disappointment and anger on the field.

    by saying (and capitalizing) "VERY narrow" when describing a pods skills you are inflammatory. by saying that you don't understand why anyone would want to be a podiatrist, you are inflammatory. by saying podiatry is a 'back door route' to being a doctor, you are inflammatory. a back door route could be seen as carribean medical schools, some ignorant people would consider DO a backdoor route. podiatry is not a back door route to anything.
    you once posted the following:
    "I've read several posts where the poster claims to have gotten into MD or DO school, but decided to go to pod school instead. This is mystifying to me."

    that is a comment you made which tells a lot about you. you basically see MD/DO as the final product, something that everyone strives for and see it as the one and only true health profession. it is people like you that do the health system a disservice because you are the ones that create this hierarchy of BS that puts the title "doctor" on a pedestal. it probably boggles your mind why one would go into dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, etc if they had an acceptance to MD/DO school.

    i am wasting my time enough on this reply, but please quick knocking down podiatry just because YOU didn't like it. keep in mind times have changed and podiatry isn't like it used to be either. yes, there are problems within the field of podiatry, but there are problems in EVERY field.
    (oh yeah, everything here is just my opinion and hope none of it was inflammatory)
     
  21. Osteodog

    Osteodog DO, DPM
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    Easy, partner. I guess if you are uncomfortable with my opinions, then you might see them as inflammatory. And, you certainly managed to spew out a lot of rhetoric in a relatively short post.

    What makes me "ignorant"? My own personal experience? My DPM and DO education? It's best that you save your personal attacks unless you can back it up with some intelligent research.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with me admitting that I didn't want to be a pod in the 1st place. There's also nothing wrong with me feeling bitter about my crappy education/"residency". Remember, since we do live in the United States I am entitled to express my opinion. I also couldn't get into MD/DO school on my 1st attempt but did get into pod school. Do you think I'm the 1st pod student who experienced this? I've NEVER said that I don't understand why anyone would want to be a podiatrist. If I did say that I thought podiatry was a backdoor route to being a doctor, I shouldn't have because that is highly inflammatory. If I said that, it was because I was angry about my own personal experience. I also have my own, personal misgivings on whether or not I felt like a "doctor" after I finished my pod education. Using "backdoor route" was inappropriate and I apologize. And, yes, I did post this "I've read several posts where the poster claims to have gotten into MD or DO school, but decided to go to pod school instead. This is mystifying to me." Again. My opinion. It is mystifying to me. Please de-mystify this for everyone. Forgive this assumption, but it does stand to reason that most students who enter pod school are interested in being a doctor. If this is true, then you may or may not agree with me that a DO or MD education will train you more broadly to be a full physician than you would as a pod student. If your desire is to be a physician then why would you choose podiatry school? Granted, there are certainly some people who may not be interested in learning all aspects of medicine and who are satisfied with finishing a medically truncated education (oohh...more inflammatory remarks...or am I just pointing out the obvious difference in educations...?). Of course, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this! You seem to confuse my opinions on medical education with some sort of egomaniacal view on the world of health care. My puzzlement arises from the idea that if someone wants to be a physician and has the opportunity to pursue a medical education (in the U.S. or another legitimate venue) then why would they choose a podiatric education? Why did they even apply to MD or DO school in the 1st place? It's no secret that it's pretty freaking easy to get into pod school and more competitive to get into medical school (save a few overseas schools). Why would one choose pod school if they also got into a LEGIT med school? If you are so secure with your choice in podiatry then you really shouldn't read my posts as inflammatory. I really don't understand why someone would choose podiatry over a legitimate medical school if being a doctor is their ultimate goal.

    When I said "VERY narrow" my intent was to point out the VERY narrow amount of training and education a podiatrist might receive that an MD or DO would not receive in terms of diagnosing/managing a patient. Many FP residents do one or two months of podiatry rotations which teaches them the basics. Ortho residents are trained in many of the pod surgical techniques (but not all). Presumably, if you are interested in combining the two types of education (med school and pod school) you would choose one of these specialties. What's left in podiatry isn't worth the additional cost or time that you would have to invest to get your dual degree. My position is that there isn't a whole lot that is "proprietary knowledge" in the field of podiatric medicine that you will not or cannot learn as an MD or DO. The minute amount of technical information is not worth the extra investment. Further, my position is also that life is much easier as an MD or DO than it is as a DPM. I'm sure this statement also pisses you off, but I've already spent my wad on this particular sub-topic. This link is emblematic of the differences in job opportunities:

    http://www.aafp.org/fpm/20010200/3314al.html

    In reference to your other statement that I see MD/DO as the final product - yes, I do see an MD and a DO as the most complete medical education one can receive. What's wrong with this? Did I say that anyone else was inferior? No. Did you imagine that I said this? Yes. Additionally, I have NEVER, EVER denegrated podiatry in any of my posts. Podiatrists are an extremely important part of the healthcare system and they do not get nearly the respect and attention that they deserve. It still amazes me how ignorant MD's and DO's are when it comes to what a pod can do.

    You have no idea who I am. I treat everyone that I meet with equal respect and dignity. I don't think that I'm better than anyone nor do I think that I'm smarter than anyone. Healthcare is a team effort. Frankly, I think that oftentimes doctors know more than they need to and the nurses know what's important. If you're interested in bashing me on this forum, back it up with at least a little bit of research. If I'm out of line, I'll apologize.
     

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