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Dual-Program...Yes/No?

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by drhygiene, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. drhygiene

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    When a school asks you whether you would like to be considered for their dual degree program should you say yes/no? I know no one knows an exact answer to this, but what do you think? what did you all put?

    for example: dds/mba , dds/phd, dmd/phd
     
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  3. UCLAzy

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    what is this i dont even
     
  4. MorgAnn

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    I was actually looking into the dual DDS/DMD and PhD degree.. If you choose this path at a school, it will most likely end with you participating in more research/teaching rather than practicing. Also, some schools give you free tuition if you get excepted into these rigorous programs. I know Ohio State pays for all 7 years of education if you get accepted into the program - I bet that it is different at each school though.
     
  5. UCLAzy

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    getting a phd with your dds means you like research more than dentistry. PERIOD. or else you're just wasting 3-4 years of your life.

    also, keep in mind that 7 years is the minimum. many candidates stay for longer because not all research projects actually work out.

    it's definitely not something to look at lightly. there are also penalties for dropping most of these programs if you take money from them.
     
  6. seattlesun

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    Be honest. Say yes only if you want to also pursue it. Usually to do a DDS/PhD you need to apply to both D-school and Grad school at the same time at that particular school. Entry in one program does not guarantee entry in the other. Some people might be accepted for the PhD and not for a DDS, or viceversa. You also would need to take the GRE, not only the DAT.

    You can always do your DDS and than later go for the PhD. The dual degree program saves you a year of school or so: in 7 years you get both degrees instead of 8 (if you do DDS followed by PhD).
     
  7. dantemac

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    I agree with the above post, be honest. If you don't want to do it, just check off no. Remember, not every single candidate is going to the school to research.
     
  8. Bumbl3b33

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    That's the stupidest thing you could have said. Getting a dual degree means you like both fields and want to integrate those two aspects in your life/career.
     
  9. MedDevil

    MedDevil Cool Cat Rollin' In.
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    Calm down. While you're right in the sense that they like both fields, I'm certain that the majority of people that choose the DDS/PhD path go into academia rather than private practice.
     
  10. UCLAzy

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    no need for name calling. the fact of the matter is if you are an academic dentist looking for tenure at a research institution, you spend maybe 80% of time in the lab and/or teaching, 20% or less for practicing. i dont need you to believe me, but your fairytale version of liking both fields and integrating them is misinformed.
     
  11. 7 yrs minimum? I know someone who just graduated and got his DDS/PhD in 6 yrs with no shortcuts.
     
  12. UCLAzy

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    there are always exceptions to the rule. time spent on PhD is dependent on the P.I., the student's work ethic and most of all if the project turns out to be something that has actual meaning.

    the '7 years' is the number that most of these dual degree programs advertise. in reality, if someone says 'you WILL get a phd in x years', either they're lying to you or you're not doing original research.
     

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