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711082

Hi everyone, new to this forum. I am a senior undergraduate looking to work in a clinical setting. I like cardiology a lot. My school offers an accelerated EKG course to prepare to pass an ekg exam to be certified. I am trying to get into Med school two years down the road. Does an EKG technician experience look good for admissions and will it count as health care experience? I'm debating whether it is worth it or not.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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You'll learn how to do an EKG in medical school. Do what you need to get clinical experience and or monies.
 
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711082

Ok, but didn't really answer my question. Should I pursue it now to look good for admissions? Or are you saying look for something else better?
 

pericardium

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Ok, but didn't really answer my question. Should I pursue it now to look good for admissions? Or are you saying look for something else better?
As an EKG tech myself, I would say you could, but you'll be better off devoting that time studying for the MCAT, getting A's in your classes etc. IMHO, scribe or EMT experience is better also.
 

Oo Cipher oO

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Hi everyone, new to this forum. I am a senior undergraduate looking to work in a clinical setting. I like cardiology a lot. My school offers an accelerated EKG course to prepare to pass an ekg exam to be certified. I am trying to get into Med school two years down the road. Does an EKG technician experience look good for admissions and will it count as health care experience? I'm debating whether it is worth it or not.
FWIW I passed the EKG tech certification class and test. I took it as a back up in case I did not get into medical school in order to et better clinical experience for my replication the following year to improve my clinical experience. I never ended up needing it but I am happy I took it. Yes you learn to read EKGs in med school but they don't devote enough time (at least at my school) to recognize patterns other than the obvious A-fib, A-flutter, STEMI.

Pro-tip: If you do take the class and you are asked to interpret at EKG at morning rounds that impresses the residents and attending don't blow the moment, like I did, by saying it was no big deal cause you were an EKG tech before medical school. It's easier to impress when their expectations are lower.
 

OrdinaryDO

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It doesn't look better to have such certificate. I ve seen ppl with cls, radio tech, ma, emt. Such experience will not make you stand out, but still good to have if you don't have enough clinical time, gpa and mcat are more important than anything.
I think there is a gray area in this statement. Your MCAT and GPA only get your foot through the door, but even with a decent score on either one of those can do you that justice. I believe it was 2013 when I saw a chart in the MSAR indicating what part of the application process held the most weight with the ADCOMs admitting a student. The statistic was ~75% of the ADCOMs say the interview was the most important part of the application process. Within the interview you should expect to talk about your life experiences, express your liking for their school, and evaluation of your personality.

True story---A family friend graduated from Harvard with very competitive stats (~3.8gpa 32-35 MCAT; I can't recall 100%). He applied to the University of Oklahoma and was rejected for not having any volunteer experience and no clinical background. They basically told him that his undergraduate school and GPA doesn't hold much weight with them without the correct ECs. In case some of you are skeptic about this, he only applied to OU because he was convinced there was no way he'd be rejected and he is from that area. This was 3-4 years ago and he did get in the next year.
 
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I think there is a gray area in this statement. Your MCAT and GPA only get your foot through the door, but even with a decent score on either one of those can do you that justice. I believe it was 2013 when I saw a chart in the MSAR indicating what part of the application process held the most weight with the ADCOMs admitting a student. The statistic was ~75% of the ADCOMs say the interview was the most important part of the application process. Within the interview you should expect to talk about your life experiences, express your liking for their school, and evaluation of your personality.

True story---A family friend graduated from Harvard with very competitive stats (~3.8gpa 32-35 MCAT; I can't recall 100%). He applied to the University of Oklahoma and was rejected for not having any volunteer experience and no clinical background. They basically told him that his undergraduate school and GPA doesn't hold much weight with them without the correct ECs. In case some of you are skeptic about this, he only applied to OU because he was convinced there was no way he'd be rejected and he is from that area. This was 3-4 years ago and he did get in the next year.
You are quoting a rare/extreme case. In reality, there more people with bad stats+good EC than good stats+bad EC because those with applicants with good stats are not that stupid to apply with zero clinical hours. The gap between bad EC and good EC are very small (a few hundred hour clinical exposure can meet the requirements for most school), but stats are impossible for many to fix.
 
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OrdinaryDO

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You are quoting a rare/extreme case. In reality, there more people with bad stats+good EC than good stats+bad EC because those with applicants with good stats are not that stupid to apply with zero clinical hours. The gap between bad EC and good EC are very small (a few hundred hour clinical exposure can meet the requirements for most school), but stats are impossible for many to fix.
I don't think the case is rare or extreme at all. I am not sure how you know there are more people with bad stats+good EC since there is no way to quantify that situation. It's widely known that as long as you have good enough stats to get an interview, the ECs and personality are what get you in. I'm not discounting your statement that stats are very important, but the realistic approach is that stats can be considered good depending on where you apply. People get into MD/DO programs with 3.2+ GPA all the time, but you have to choose your schools wisely. DO schools are also more friendly towards non-traditional students and they pay more attention to ECs than MD schools do. The MCAT is one thing that I can't argue against, though. I had a surgeon tell me not even 3 months ago (in his own words) "Crush the fu**ing MCAT, crush that **** because medical schools don't give a damn about the rest." Now, obviously his quote can't be taken too literally, but I do believe the MCAT can make up for A LOT of slack in certain areas.
 
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I don't think the case is rare or extreme at all. I am not sure how you know there are more people with bad stats+good EC since there is no way to quantify that situation. It's widely known that as long as you have good enough stats to get an interview, the ECs and personality are what get you in. I'm not discounting your statement that stats are very important, but the realistic approach is that stats can be considered good depending on where you apply. People get into MD/DO programs with 3.2+ GPA all the time, but you have to choose your schools wisely. DO schools are also more friendly towards non-traditional students and they pay more attention to ECs than MD schools do. The MCAT is one thing that I can't argue against, though. I had a surgeon tell me not even 3 months ago (in his own words) "Crush the fu**ing MCAT, crush that **** because medical schools don't give a damn about the rest." Now, obviously his quote can't be taken too literally, but I do believe the MCAT can make up for A LOT of slack in certain areas.
https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html
check this out, for those >33 >3.8, the acceptance >90% across all races. Let's say those 10% fall into the category of "stupid" with minimal EC, it's only about 500 (I am only looking at the white file). There are nearly 10k applicants with less than 26 and 3.6, soooo.... I am sure a good number of these applicants have good EC, there is no way to figure a exact number, but must be more than 500.
 
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OrdinaryDO

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https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html
check this out, for those >33 >3.8, the acceptance >90% across all races. Let's say those 10% fall into the category of "stupid" with minimal EC, it's only about 500 (I am only looking at the white file). There are nearly 10k applicants with less than 26 and 3.6, soooo.... I am sure a good number of these applicants have good EC, there is no way to figure a exact number, but must be more than 500.
I understand what you are talking about, but here is where I will introduce the all to famous phrase "correlation does not mean causation." Of course it would seem like those who scored very high on both ends would be more proactive and motivated to do well on the application and interview. It only makes sense that someone who would put their time and effort into doing that well in undergrad and on the MCAT would perform well on possibly the easiest part of the application that only takes motivation to accomplish (volunteering, clinical experience, interview skills.) What I am saying, though, is if you have good ENOUGH stats to permit an interview, your ECs carry the load the rest of the way for the most part. I have read it from medical students and ADCOM members on this forums. My cGPA is 3.47, but my upward trend is amazing since starting out. But, what people don't see in the lower numbers is when I had to deal with homelessness, poverty, moving from state to state, and supporting my family at times. That, along with the fact that I have thousands of hours of clinical experience and volunteering would carry weight from what I am told.
 

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If you would want to work as an EKG tech otherwise, then yes, take the course. But don't take it thinking it's going to look "good" on your app. It's not going to impress anyone.

That doesn't mean it's a negative on your app. Just that it's not some status symbol that's going to make ADCOM's think you're smarter than the average applicant or anything.

And believe me, Cardiac Physiology is awesome. I thought Cardiology would be a cool career (and there's certainly plenty of $$$ to be made). Then I did my cardiology rotation and realized that there's no amount of money out there that makes a cardiologists lifestyle worth it.

Hopefully you don't have a similar experience. That or I hope you have other interests. Because the life of a cardiologist pretty much sucks IMO. I'm not willing to put in 100+ hours per week, even for $500K+
 
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I understand what you are talking about, but here is where I will introduce the all to famous phrase "correlation does not mean causation." Of course it would seem like those who scored very high on both ends would be more proactive and motivated to do well on the application and interview. It only makes sense that someone who would put their time and effort into doing that well in undergrad and on the MCAT would perform well on possibly the easiest part of the application that only takes motivation to accomplish (volunteering, clinical experience, interview skills.) What I am saying, though, is if you have good ENOUGH stats to permit an interview, your ECs carry the load the rest of the way for the most part. I have read it from medical students and ADCOM members on this forums. My cGPA is 3.47, but my upward trend is amazing since starting out. But, what people don't see in the lower numbers is when I had to deal with homelessness, poverty, moving from state to state, and supporting my family at times. That, along with the fact that I have thousands of hours of clinical experience and volunteering would carry weight from what I am told.
so based on your theory then, you should be able to get into any school you want!
 
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Is that what you got out of that post? The only thing my story provides is an indicator that numbers don't show the whole picture. The first thing my state MD school looks at is the personal letter. GPA and MCAT aren't even the second or third thing they look at. Why? Well, according to them, they would rather bring in students with quality instead of looking at purely the quantitative part.
what i got out of your post was a humblebrag about your remarkable life story and thousands of hours of clinical experience that you tell yourself to make up for your lackluster gpa. did i miss something? bottom line is, its about the whole package. dont count on one thing to make up for another. there are outliers but it sounds like you keep trying to convince yourself that you are one of them. best of luck.