Metabolics

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Apr 17, 2012
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virginia
If electromagnetic radiation is a form of heat, or energy transfer, can electromagnetic radiation be emitted from a colder object millions of miles away, and reach and warm up a slighter warmer object?

I know heat travels from "hot" to "cold". But if, say, a random high frequency electromagnetic ray comes from a cold object (which is not the norm, since colder objects emit low frequency, but I assume there is a probability of it happening), can that electromagnetic radiation with a high frequency not go essentially from a cold object to a warm object?

Is there a limit to how warm an object can get by using a certain wavelength of electromagnetic wave? Or is the transfer from "hot" to "cold" limited only to conduction and convection?
 

Tatiana3325

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Winter of our discontent
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If electromagnetic radiation is a form of heat, or energy transfer, can electromagnetic radiation be emitted from a colder object millions of miles away, and reach and warm up a slighter warmer object?

I know heat travels from "hot" to "cold". But if, say, a random high frequency electromagnetic ray comes from a cold object (which is not the norm, since colder objects emit low frequency, but I assume there is a probability of it happening), can that electromagnetic radiation with a high frequency not go essentially from a cold object to a warm object?

Is there a limit to how warm an object can get by using a certain wavelength of electromagnetic wave? Or is the transfer from "hot" to "cold" limited only to conduction and convection?
There is no temperature in empty space. There isn't enough matter to absorb moving energy. Most of space is plasma. Photons we observe on earth in the form of light or feel as thermal energy had been traveling through space until coming into contact with earth (matter).