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Engineering majors and Med school admissions

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by CU_buffalo, Jun 20, 2002.

  1. CU_buffalo

    CU_buffalo Member
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    People have told me that engineering majors have an advantage in getting into med school than science or liberal arts majors. Is this accurate? I'm applying as an engineer and am quite worried about getting in. I also have other engineering friends who have lower MCAT scores and gpa's than I do, but feel they are a "lock" to get in, and tell me not to worry so much. Any thoughts?
     
  2. Flack Pinku

    Flack Pinku U lookin at my glasses??
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    Hey there,

    I am hoping to be an Engineering major as well. I am hoping I can do Biological Engineering with enough time to still do some quality work outside (extracurriculars and lab & volunteer work).

    I heard of that from many Pre-med advisors--Engineering majors having an clear advantage given all else about equal. I hope it will pull me through when I need it. :)

    It's just very time consuming--you'll have a full courseload every semester and it is just daunting. Other than that, it's no big deal. But the math & physical sciences skills you'd get from being an Engineering major are just amazing (unless you're already a genius). <img border="0" alt="[Clappy]" title="" src="graemlins/clappy.gif" />
     
  3. CU_buffalo

    CU_buffalo Member
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    Flack: Which engineering school are you going to? I've finished three years of engineering coursework now and believe me it's really tough. If you can handle the engineering courseload, all your premed courses will be a breeze. I remember taking ochem and grad-level biochem my freshmen and sophomore years, thinking they would be my hardest classes, but it turned out my Calc 3, programming and intro engineering classes were way harder and way more time consuming. My main mistake was not giving myself enough time to study for the MCATs. If you are totally set on becoming a doctor, start studying for the MCATs as soon as possible. I started 2 months before and pulled a 33. Some of my non-engineering buddies started a year before and got 38+. Anyways good luck with everything. Engineering may be harder, but will be way more interesting than most of your science classes.
     
  4. Flack Pinku

    Flack Pinku U lookin at my glasses??
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    I go to Cornell in fall. I am sophomore, and have done all of my math requirements (except Statistics). Calculus through Differential Equations & Linear Algebra--all done. Also Physics Mechanics & E/M.

    Chem, I have to start on this fall. Bio too. I've changed from being an Electrical Engineer to Biological Engineer, so I didn't take all the required Chem and Bio. Luckily, I have Bio AP credit, to get me out of one intro class.

    Only thing that's bugging me now is this--Clinical Experience!! :(

    I don't know where and how I can get it. I'm volunteering at the hospital in the ER, but that's not counted as Clinical Experience (if I understand correctly). :rolleyes:

    I can't try more than this to get Clinical Experience due to my lack of car, time, etc. I hope volunteering at the ER would be considered enough.

    Your opinions are welcome! :)
     
  5. beanbean

    beanbean 1K Member
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    Hi! I majored in Biomedical Engineering at Boston University and worked as a Clinical Engineer at a large hospital for 7 years. A great option for clinical experience is to volunteer in the Biomedical Engineering Department of a hospital near you. I had an engineering student who shadowed with me for a summer. You gain great exposure to all areas of a hospital, as well as learn about some really amazing technology and equipment. I was responsible for all of the Cardiology (Cath Lab, EP Lab, Ultrasound, ECG) equipment, Endoscopy, and supervised technicians who worked on everything from defibrilators to infusion pumps. I worked closely with physicians and other hospital staff. Best of all you may have the opportunity to observe surgery or other procedures.

    I think most departments would love to have an intelligent and motivated student volunteer with them. Just ask the hospital operator who the Director of Biomedical or Clinical Engineering is...smaller hospitals may combine biomed with General Engineering and Plant Maintenance.

    I may be biased, but I think engineering is a great field to prepare for medicine. Its not for everybody; but it certainly will prepare you for the rigors of med school and your problem solving skills will be top-notch. Good luck!
     
  6. Hopkins2010

    Hopkins2010 Membership Revoked
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    I agree that engineering is good training for medicine, but I dont think you get any noticeable "plus" in the admissions process for being an engineering major.

    I was electrical/computer engineering in college. I think most interviewers dont really know what engineering is and therefore dont know whether its supposedly more difficult or not compared to bio, chem, physics, math, etc.
     
  7. oldman

    oldman Senior Citizen
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Hopkins2010:
    <strong>I agree that engineering is good training for medicine, but I dont think you get any noticeable "plus" in the admissions process for being an engineering major.

    I was electrical/computer engineering in college. I think most interviewers dont really know what engineering is and therefore dont know whether its supposedly more difficult or not compared to bio, chem, physics, math, etc.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">your avatar is very familiar. i think i saw it on dan ennis's web page.
     
  8. CD

    CD Senior Member
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    The way Engr. degrees is looked at depends upon the school. And yes, in some cases Engr. degrees DO have an advantage (I'm not sure how much). I had already completed my C.E. degree when I became enamored with medicine, so I called our state med school and asked for advice. I was told my 3.35 g.p.a. was "outstanding" for our states engr. program. (3.35 was graduating with high honors at my school). I'm sure if I applied out of state my degree would not be looked at so favorably. Hope this helps.
     
  9. Flack Pinku

    Flack Pinku U lookin at my glasses??
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    Hey CD, you mind telling us what School you went to for Undergrad and what med school you applied to?

    Also, is C.E. Civil Engineering or Computer Engineering (or something totally different perhaps)?

    Thanks a lot!
     
  10. Engg to Doc

    Engg to Doc Member
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    I have been a s/w engineer for 4 years now. I quit a perfectly well paying job to get into school full time in summer - I guess that sends a strong message about my commitment to medicine and also shows that I am not in it for the respectability of the profession or for the money one could presumably make from it, because I have had both and chose to give it up. My pre-med advisor said that this could work favorably for me.
     
  11. CD

    CD Senior Member
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    "Hey CD, you mind telling us what School you went to for Undergrad and what med school you applied to? Also, is C.E. Civil Engineering or Computer Engineering (or something totally different perhaps)? "

    In response-- My B.S. in Civil Engr. (C.E.) is from Oregon State University (1991). Although I haven't applied yet, I called Oregon Health Sciences University (O.H.S.U.) for their advice! (I'm currently working on a M.S. in Chemistry!)
     

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