axp107

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Confused... are both neurotransmitters?

During sympathetic activity, epi is used and during parasympathetic Ach is used right?

EK says that Ach is always used though.. since it has to be released between neuron synapses.

Getting confused when Epi and Ach is used =(
 

EECStoMed

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Yes, both are neurotransmitters. However, in the autonomic nervous system which can be broken down into the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems there are subtle differences, particularly in the pre and post synaptic ganglia. Both the Sym and Parasym use acetylcholine in the preganglia neuro junctions but for the Sympathetic system, norepinephrine is used in the post ganglia against the target organ whereas for the para, acetylcholine is used. So the picture goes like this:
.................Sympathetic..........Parasympathetic
Preganglia Acetylcholine .........Acetylcholine
Postgalgia Norepinephrine.........Acetylcholine

Confused... are both neurotransmitters?

During sympathetic activity, epi is used and during parasympathetic Ach is used right?

EK says that Ach is always used though.. since it has to be released between neuron synapses.

Getting confused when Epi and Ach is used =(
 
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DoctorPhud

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Confused... are both neurotransmitters?

During sympathetic activity, epi is used and during parasympathetic Ach is used right?

EK says that Ach is always used though.. since it has to be released between neuron synapses.

Getting confused when Epi and Ach is used =(

Both are neurotransmitters...

The important thing, is that both parasymp and symp use ACh for the first leg. Then the sympathetic motor neurons have a synapse to a second neuron along the way, which then uses Epi as the neurotransmitter. Parasymp does this too, but much closer to the tissues, and uses ACh again, so you can choose to ignore that. Think of sympathetic as 2 step and 2 NTs. This converting point is a ganglia.

Wikipedia says:

At synapses within the sympathetic ganglia, preganglionic sympathetic neurons release acetylcholine, a chemical messenger that binds and activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on postganglionic neurons. In response to this stimulus, postganglionic neurons principally release noradrenaline (norepinephrine).
 
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EECStoMed

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Oh, and also, in the somatic nervous system as opposed to the autonomic nervous system, ONLY Ach is used. Hope this clears some stuff up.
 

EECStoMed

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Both are neurotransmitters...

The important thing, is that both parasymp and symp use ACh for the first leg. Then the sympathetic motor neurons have a synapse to a second neuron along the way, which then uses Epi as the neurotransmitter. Parasymp does this too, but much closer to the tissues, and uses ACh again, so you can choose to ignore that. Think of sympathetic as 2 step and 2 NTs. This converting point is a ganglia.

Wikipedia says:

At synapses within the sympathetic ganglia, preganglionic sympathetic neurons release acetylcholine, a chemical messenger that binds and activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on postganglionic neurons. In response to this stimulus, postganglionic neurons principally release noradrenaline (norepinephrine).

haha, both of us were writing at the same time. :laugh:
 

jeesapeesa

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yes, both are neurotransmitters.

sympathetic (thoracic/lumbar):---> gang(Ach) -------- > postganglion (NE)
parasympathetic (cervical/sacral): ---> gang (Ach) -------> postgang (Ach)
 

MSTPbound

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Confused... are both neurotransmitters?

During sympathetic activity, epi is used and during parasympathetic Ach is used right?

EK says that Ach is always used though.. since it has to be released between neuron synapses.

Getting confused when Epi and Ach is used =(

Ach, from what I recall, is a pretty ubiquitous neurotransmitter that has different effects on different tissues, depending on the effector-receptors. It is used in both sympathetic and parasympethetic responses, e.g. binding to nicotinic or muscarinic receptors in the parasympathetic NS, or binding to adrenergic receptors in the sympathetic NS. Many uses for many different reasons/needs.

Secretion of epinenephrine or norepinephrine can occur as a result of Ach binding. Epinephrine (and norepinephrine) are both sympathetic, "fight or flight" hormones.
 

MSTPbound

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GEEZ guys... who knew so many posters were so QUICK on the draw!??

:laugh:
 

axp107

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Ganglionic.. woah.. never introduced to that term before.

I just know.. sensory --> interneuron --> motor neuron

are you saying that for .. sympathetic:

between the pre and post synapses of sensory and interneurons, its Ach
but between the pre and post synapses of interneurons and motor neurons, its Epi?

Can someone explain what pre and post ganglion means xD
 

Green Pirate

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ganglion = cell bodies.
nerves = axons


somewhat related:

grey matter = cell bodies
white matter = axons (myelinated)

I don't know that a "ganglion" is merely cell bodies, but rather a region rich in cell bodies and dendrites with a bunch of nerves synapsing.
 

BrokenGlass

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I don't know that a "ganglion" is merely cell bodies, but rather a region rich in cell bodies and dendrites with a bunch of nerves synapsing.

A GANGLION is a group of nerve cell bodies located in the peripheral nervous system.

A NUCLEUS is a group of nerve cell bodies located in the central nervous system.
 
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