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PhD/PsyD EPPP Studying Thread

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by KateSpade05, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. KateSpade05

    KateSpade05 Clinical Psychologist
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    I thought I would make a more recent thread of those of us who are studying and intending to take the EPPP either in Fall 2017 or sometime during the upcoming winter. I've found older threads on this topic very informative related to what resources to purchase and how to organize studying -- but the most recent thread I could find was from 2012. For myself, I have recently purchased the online AATBS exams and scored a 60% on my first attempt. I've read less than half of the study manuals at this point, so I feel fairly confident that score will be easy to raise once I am more familiar with I/O and brush up on my test construction and stats knowledge.

    Where are you in your study plan? What materials have you acquired or plan to purchase? What is your target date for taking the exam?

    I hope this can be a place to regularly support one another and share strategies we find effective!
     
    cantstocans likes this.
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  3. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Can we just make like one EPPP Studying sticky thread? That way we don't get like 10 new ones of these a year?
     
  4. PerceptionBlinder

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    Hi! I passed my jurisprudence exam last week and am waiting on the Board to register for the EPPP. I'm probably only going to give myself 4-6 weeks, because being the procrastinator I am I'm unlikely to benefit much from months of "studying." I'm three years out from internship and am a little worried about not remembering concepts from 7-8 years ago. So far, I've been through a box of Academic Review flash cards (sorted between stuff I know and stuff I need to learn), and I'm finishing up going through the "retired questions" exam while studying those I miss. Will likely buy an older (and cheaper) set of study materials, mainly for the practice exams. Rote memorization of theories and facts is hard for me, but going through the retired questions exam and reading up has been very helpful so far.
     
  5. cantstocans

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    I finished grad school in 94 and have worked as a school psych, so I knew I had to study a lot of new material. I ordered and read the Momotrix book and flashcards over the last year and buckled down in the last three weeks. Working full time and post doc hours doing therapy sessions after school and weekends - left me with about 15 hours a week of hard core study time. I also scoured the internet and read most of the DSM-V. I made numerous 1/2 hour voice memos on my iphone as I studied, sometimes making a mneuomonic to help me remember things. I usually talked fast and even added in statements like - "You will get your private practice license. Take a deep breath and know it to be true - this is your calling, this is your destiny. Your future patients are counting on you!"

    10 days ago, I took one practice test online - via the Taylor Study method for free and got a 63 percent. That told me I was close - so I scheduled for a practice Exam with Pearson. I am pretty jazzed, because, even though I was challenged, today I scored a 485 at the testing center where I will eventually PASS the EPPP. That score made me feel confident about my study habits. Taking the PEPPP early on to gauge readiness and deal with the pressure of the test situation was a wise decision and worth the 115 dollars. There are 100 questions in two hours. Guessed on about 20% with no clue. Educated guess on about 20% and the rest I felt pretty confident answering. Bio basis was my main focus of study since I thought that would be tough for me and it was my highest area.

    As a result, I do not plan on paying any money for any of the canned study stuff, even though I could easily afford it since I have been earning money for years and long ago paid off all debt. Studying is so EASY these days, with the help of the internet. YouTube is amazing and so many good lectures to listen to. The CRASH course series for psychiatry has been very helpful to me, as just one example. Khan Academy, also on YouTube, explains many things we need to know with ingenious simplicity. There are also some good Apps and I like EPPP Prep, partly because the print is large and it was 29 dollars, I think. I can take practice tests while standing in line at the grocery store - never a wasted moment!
    I scheduled the PEPPP2 for Oct 26 and as soon as I get the go-ahead from my supervisor, I will schedule the EPPP - can't believe it costs 687.00! Once better be enough!
     
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  6. PerceptionBlinder

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    Cantsocans, that's quite the gap between grad school and the EPPP, congrats on your progress so far. I also work in a school setting, and I think that has reduced some of the anxiety (worst case, I have to pay and take it again, but I don't need licensure ASAP).

    I ended up buying a set of 2013 materials (Academic Review and PsychPrep) for only $150. The AR materials especially have been very valuable; I like how they provide sample questions after every short section and then more questions between every major content area. Using these materials has provided a much more condensed way for me to focus my studying time. Since these materials are DSM-IV, I read the Differential Diagnosis section for all the major DSM-5 disorders and found it very helpful. Additionally, I bought a $10 used Intro to I-O Psych textbook, because reading a little more in-depth helps me retain the material better when it's completely new to me. I do wish I had more practice exams.

    I also took the online PEPPPO a couple weeks ago -- the $65 version. Unfortunately, this does not seem to give you anything more than a "pass/fail" and then a visual chart showing performance in each (very) general area. I passed, and I did write down some concepts I hadn't studied yet, but I wish it showed an actual score. Based on earlier posts in this forum, it used to give a scaled score? I'm not going to pay again for the second version.

    I am taking the test on Tuesday. One thing I also wasn't aware of was how you need to schedule it at least a few weeks out, and may need to drive -- my test center is an hour away, and when I registered there were very few available dates within a few weeks with none on weekends.

    Good luck with your continued studies!
     
  7. ktnyc

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    I'm just getting started on serious studying - before this I've listened to audio reviews while driving. I have the 2017 AATBS study prep books, access to many practice exams, etc. Would love a study buddy or study group if anyone in the NYC area (or anywhere if you can do google hangouts or skype) is interested. Registered to take the exam on Dec 16th.
     
  8. proudvegan

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    Hello everyone. I am in need of some help/support/guidance at this point. I have taken the course multiple times. I am taking the test next week and unfortunately, I know I won't pass. I have been staying positive throughout the process.... I have learned that I am just a horrible test taker. I have extreme anxiety that I forget the answers and have a hard time staying focused. I start to 'check out' after some time. I know that I have most of the knowledge (with the exception of statistics), but I just can't seem to read the questions correctly.

    I originally started off with Psych Prep because that is what my employer had at the time and my coworkers were able to pass the exam. I recently switched to AATBS and felt confident with the reading material. I read each domain at a time; however, I failed to reviewed them. I took the AATBS practice tests (at least 5 of them) and scored between 48-51%. I noticed that incorrect answers were mostly Statistic related and I also recognized that my first or second guesses were correct when I had then reverted to the incorrect answers. I find AATBS was better understood after reading Psych Prep multiple times. I have study guides and even study guides from the weekend workshop. I have used the EPPP app that has flashcards which is somewhat helpful. I also have the AATBS self-paced online workshop which I have not finished reviewing.

    I study better with another person. Rehearsing and reading back to the other person is much helpful for me to remember and understand the concept/theory. Unfortunately, I do not know anyone at this time that is going through this study process and likes to study with another.

    If anyone is interested in studying together, whether it is reviewing the material, going over the exam questions, etc, please contact me. I can skype, facetime, google chat, WhatsApp, etc. If anyone has any recommendations for a one-on-one support, let me know how I can go about it.

    Part of me is tempted to cancel the exam and postpone it. :( Part of me was hoping that I'd pass this time so I can be done with it already! I just don't know what I am doing wrong and how I can improve my test taking skills.
     
  9. singasongofjoy

    Psychologist 2+ Year Member

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    During the test make sure to pace yourself. Make yourself take breaks every so often to actually leave the room, walk around, do some stretches and breathing exercises, get a small snack, give your eyes and brain a break. This was extremely helpful for me - when I did this during the practice tests i always scored a bit better, and so i did the same during the actual test. There are too many questions to sit and do it all in one fell swoop.
     
  10. proudvegan

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    Thank you, Singasongofjoy. I have only taken one break during the times I was taking the actual exams. I am in California and the Pearson centers are a bit tricky. They allow you to go to the bathroom and drink water that is provided to you in the room, but you can't go to your locker or eat anything. I always try to make sure I am eating a healthy brain food before my test. I am going to take another practice test today and try the multiple breaks and see how I do.

    The exams also use exaggerated adjectives. Instead of saying "angry," it is expanded into 2 or 3 adjectives to describe it.. lol. That frustrates me.
     
  11. proudvegan

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    Oh and when I take multiple breaks, i am always worried that I will run out of time. I calculated with 1.12 minute per questions..
     
  12. singasongofjoy

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    The way I got around taht worry was 1) a lot of timed practice tests in which I took as long during my breaks as I felt I needed to in order to clear my head, 2) figuring it's better to finish most of the test with a clear head and more likely to have gotten the questions correct than all of the questions but having done them with a foggy brain. In the end I still had more than an hour to spare. Maybe you're spending too much time debating the questions and not enough time flagging the hard ones for later follow-up? More than a minute per question for every question on average seems like a lot. My approach was go through and do the easy / moderate ones first (remembering to eliminate improbable answers, like any that have "always" or "never") and then take a break before going back through to start tackling the harder ones. Of course what works for me might not work for you, but that was my approach.
     
  13. foreverbull

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  14. hpxb

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    I'm starting to study now as well. I'm not in your area, but I'd be open to at least being accountabilibuddies, keeping one another updated on our study progress :)

    You mentioned listening to audio reviews. Are there any specific audio resources you might recommend? Thanks!
     
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  15. singasongofjoy

    Psychologist 2+ Year Member

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    I found the aatbs audio recordings to be helpful.
     
  16. cantstocans

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    Passed with a whisker of room, but got by without buying the commercial on-line instructional materials, after all. See previous long post of my journey. I had read here that if we can accomplish a near pass percentage, especially on the PEPPP, that we could be fairly sure to pass the EPPP. It was so close for me, that I wanted to warn others, to really be sure and ready before scheduling. For me, the challenge was the stamina required for such a long test. I worked steady with hardly a moment to even close my eyes and take a deep breath, and finished with only 16 minutes to spare. At that point I knew if I checked any answers I would probably just make things worse, so I quit. I thought my score would be much higher than the 504 I achieved. Therefore, I found myself angry for all those that struggle to pass this test. I agree that it is too long and too clogged with unnecessary circumlocutions and vocabulary. Once again, I will say that second language learners are at a steep disadvantage and with the ranks of psychologists diminishing, instead of swelling, and a need for cultural diversity, the test eliminates too many. I needed a few days to simmer down to post here and I am only just now starting to be happy about my own passing score. My mistake that you can learn from, is, do not be too confident and start to think you have probably passed enough items. Every question adds some points and is worth the effort. I wish I had taken a short mid break, since I was thirsty and had to pee after the first hour. I was uncomfortable, which also added to my rush to finish.
    Also, I used PrepJet free trial for a week and loved the tips there. They seem to be a newer cheaper alternative. I had full access and they never asked for a credit card. I recorded myself reading much of the material and then listened to it for weeks after the free trial.
    I rented and voice recorded mini lectures for myself to listen to from this very helpful text Selecting Effective Treatments.
    I also purchased an older retired textbook, since it had been so long since I was in graduate school and cultural issues were new to me and a potential blind spot. I got a lot out of the book and read it in two days. The cost on Amazon was less than 8 dollars and it is well written and helped me on some questions that I would have missed otherwise - Cross Cultural Psychology.

    I wish you well. Know that you may stumble, you may even fall, but your journey is worth the effort. Get up again and go! You are meant to be a helper and a guide for others. Breathe deeply, be humble, seek guidance and keep moving toward your goal.
     
  17. psychrat

    psychrat licensed psychologist
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    I am scheduled to take the EPPP in a couple of weeks. I just took the PEPPP and it stated I passed, but did not provide a number. Did you get an actual number? I was bummed that it did not show me the questions I got wrong, as some I switched last minute and would like to know if that was a good decision. Did you take both PEPPP tests or just one? I am trying to decide if it is worth paying for another one. Luckily, I did not pay for any prep materials and was able to get by on material others gave to me . Thoughts?
     
  18. SpacePsych

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    No number is given on the PEPPPO. I heard the PEPPP taken at Pearson Vue will give you a score. Not sure if it’s worth it though. I only took the PEPPPO once and found it useful at the end of studying and a good confidence boost. I used the vague scales given to do a quick review of my “weaker” areas. It also is helpful to get a feel for the questions and the testing program. I feel like general consensus is if you are getting above 65% on practice exams (I used AATBS) and pass the PEPPPO then you should be good to go for the real thing. But no guarantees!
     
  19. DRM2

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    Hi,
    I am planning to take the EPPP sometime in the next few months. I hope to take it by May 2018. I have spent $1,000.00 on the ATBBS study materials and am reviewing the books. I do have a coach that is included with my study packet, but would rather talk to someone who is actually studying for the test like me. I was told to review all of the study books and then take a mock exam and once I have done this and reviewed my score, I can better gauge the amount of study time I will need and set a test date. I have three part-time jobs, two small children who are in school, and am trying to get back into being able to stick to a strict study plan. I have been out of school for several years and only took the EPPP once and did not pass it. I took it in 2010. I would like to check-in with someone regularly who is also studying for the EPPP. We can support each other along the way.

    Thanks,

    DrM2
     
  20. surflakemichigan

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    I am looking for an EPPP study group in the Chicago area. I am on the south side, but am willing to travel a little.
     
  21. ChildPsyc1625

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    Hi everyone!

    I realize that this thread has been quiet for a bit now, but I'm about to take the EPPP next week and I came on to get some words of wisdom (and hopefully comfort). I've been studying consistently for about 3 months, and I've been using PsychPrep lectures while I drive and taking AATBS practice tests. I've most recently earned 68% on my last three practice exams (when I take them for the first time; when I take them a second time I'm scoring in the mid-to-high 80's). I'm at the point where I feel like I can't cram any more information in my head, but I'm worried my scores won't be good enough. Does anyone have any thoughts? What scores were you getting on practice tests before passing?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  22. foreverbull

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    From what I've seen in EPPP threads in here, practive tests generally underestimate your Eppp performance, meaning some folks get 60s-70s on practice tests and then end up passing the EPPP. I can't say which companies underestimate scores the most...you'd have to scour the old threads. I think I was in the low to mid 70s range on a hand-me-down test at the end of my studying and I passed the EPPP.

    The general advice i was given is to study about 100 hours if you're a recent grad, more if you've been out of school longer. I stopped studying when my anxiety decreased to the point where I felt ready to get it over with, somewhere around the 90 hour mark.
    There are many factors involved: test taking ability in general, anxiety/arousal levels, type of materials and how passively or actively you study, etc. You'll have to be the ultimate judge of readiness, but since the date is set, just let go and move forward with confidence! Try not to worry too much and trust yourself!
     
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  23. ChildPsyc1625

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    Thank you!!!
     
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