Sep 9, 2018
6
13
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. EDIT: I posted my PS in a post below.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
 
Last edited:
May 2, 2018
5
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. Of course, please be respectful and don't share it with others who don't go through this avenue. For the sake of anonymity for this thread, I decided to make a new account.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
Would you mind PMing me? I can't seem to PM you for some reason!
 

CaseyNCHS

5+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2013
52
26
Status
Medical Student
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. Of course, please be respectful and don't share it with others who don't go through this avenue. For the sake of anonymity for this thread, I decided to make a new account.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
Hi, I also can't message you for some reason. do you mind PMing me?
 

CaseyNCHS

5+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2013
52
26
Status
Medical Student
Why are we wanting to define people by their sexual preferences? I don't see how that's actually all that relevant to what kind or of what quality doctor you would be.
Well, if you have done a lot of volunteer work (medical or not) with the LGBT community, you may want to use that in your application and if you do then you are essentially outing yourself. There are some great allies, but let's be honest, most of the work is done my LGBT members themselves. Some people may want to use it as a life hurdle that they had to overcome, which made them a more understanding and compassionate person. I can see many ways that someone could want to bring it up, without just saying "I'm gay, you should accept me, diversity..."
 
OP
S
Sep 9, 2018
6
13
I appreciate people wanting to have this sort of conversation, but there have already been multiple discussions on this throughout SDN that can be searched and I would really like not to distract from the purpose of the thread, which is to help fellow LGBT colleagues navigate a very difficult task for us. Whether you think these sorts of topics are relevant in the first place, please kindly discuss it elsewhere so that the primary intent of this thread is not drowned out. Very appreciated, and not trying to sound harsh.
 
Nov 11, 2018
1
0
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. Of course, please be respectful and don't share it with others who don't go through this avenue. For the sake of anonymity for this thread, I decided to make a new account.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
Hi there, I think it's so nice of you to share this. Could you PM me? Thank you again. I've been having a difficult time trying to articulate my identity.
 
OP
S
Sep 9, 2018
6
13
Hi there, I think it's so nice of you to share this. Could you PM me? Thank you again. I've been having a difficult time trying to articulate my identity.
I think you need to activate in your account the ability to have pm conversations, because I currently don't have the option to pm you
 
OP
S
Sep 9, 2018
6
13
Also, sorry for the late replies to some people. I only intermittently check this account, and am busy with residency interviews, and I know personal statements aren't due into next summer, so it might be some time until you receive responses (though I'll definitely check way more regularly over the summer)
 
Jan 6, 2019
1
0
Hey @Soundsgood2018 can you please also send me your essay. I’m queer and brown and an IMG and struggling to include my lgbtq identity in my residency application. Your help would be hugely appreciated
 
Sep 25, 2018
134
197
Status
Pre-Medical
@Soundsgood2018 Thanks so much for offering to share this with us! I'm interested in seeing how you wrote about your experience -- could you send me a copy when you get the chance?
 
Feb 13, 2019
24
6
Status
Medical Student
I am a non-US IMG who happens to be from the lgbtq community. I lost 2 years in med school due to depression.
I am currently in 4th year. Med school in my country is 5 years.

I am planning to study for USMLE. Do I really stand a chance in securing a residency in a non-competitive field even IF I get excellent step scores?

Reason for trying for USMLE is because of the way the lgbtq population is treated in my country, I mean, until 2 months back, being gay was illegal in my country and a punishable offence. Hope y’all get what I mean.
 

tantacles

Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Sep 28, 2009
7,547
2,409
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I am a non-US IMG who happens to be from the lgbtq community. I lost 2 years in med school due to depression.
I am currently in 4th year. Med school in my country is 5 years.

I am planning to study for USMLE. Do I really stand a chance in securing a residency in a non-competitive field even IF I get excellent step scores?

Reason for trying for USMLE is because of the way the lgbtq population is treated in my country, I mean, until 2 months back, being gay was illegal in my country and a punishable offence. Hope y’all get what I mean.
LGBTQ status tends to be celebrated rather than punished, though every program is different. Programs in the northeast and big cities tend to be accepting and want to know about LGBTQ status because it's an interesting facet of people's lives. Admittedly, I actively avoided rural and southern programs because I felt they would be less likely to be accepting, so I can't speak to them.
 

Firkin

2+ Year Member
Feb 6, 2017
9
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. Of course, please be respectful and don't share it with others who don't go through this avenue. For the sake of anonymity for this thread, I decided to make a new account.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
I would love to see your personal statement, as this is something I am currently wrestling with. Thanks!
 
Jul 31, 2017
9
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. Of course, please be respectful and don't share it with others who don't go through this avenue. For the sake of anonymity for this thread, I decided to make a new account.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
Would you be willing to send me a copy of your personal statement? I am wanting to see if mine is on the write track!! Thanks! :)
 
OP
S
Sep 9, 2018
6
13
I'll post it here, since residency match finished and I'm not too concerned about anonymity from two cycles ago haha. It feels weird to read things I've written years ago, and rereading it now I want to tweak or change things, but i got a good amount of interviews back then so it was ultimately successful

Good luck everyone, and again anyone else feel free to post yours as well

___________________________________

Blanche Dubois stuck out to me during my first read of "Streetcar Named Desire". Her
background and identity distance everyone around her. In the final scene of the play Blanche
is taken to a psychiatric ward because no-one believes her accusations against her
brother-in-law of sexual assault. She slowly becomes the antagonist in her family and
community, which makes her vulnerable to the actions of others around her. I chose to take
on the challenge of directing the play. I wanted to place myself in Blanche's position in order
to understand why she behaves and speaks the way she does. Directing provides me training
in empathetic connection, which is necessary to develop complex and important characters. I
want to use this training in my medical career to foster honest communication and effective
lifestyle changes with my patients.

Connecting with the Blanches of the world is an interest I also pursue in my professional work.
When I entered Johns Hopkins University I reached out to the Multicultural Student Affairs
center, which referred me to work in public health at the Center for Health, Identity,
Behavior and Prevention Studies at NYU. There, I transcribed interviews of men who had
contracted HIV in the early 1980s. They spoke about specific instances where they were left
with a deep sense of isolation and neglect. One participant was fired from his position as a
nurse when his sexual behavior and illness became known to his colleagues. He lost his home
and watched his friends pass away. In order to cope with his situation he began using drugs.
He eventually met a group of other survivors who worked together to secure jobs and housing.
This group filled the huge hole that his family and community left in his life.

His story was especially poignant to me based on my own experience with my sexuality. Two
months before I graduated high school I revealed to a friend that I am gay. When I started
receiving texts and calls from strangers, I realized she told others. Someone had put my
number on Craigslist. It was very hard to go back to school every day, and I eventually came
out to my parents so that I could find a solution to the bullying. I found an LGBT group, and I
was able to talk with people who had similar experiences and challenges as me. They helped
me feel more confident entering college and connecting with the LGBT community.

I think about how despite the response I got in high school, my LGBT group did a powerful
thing for me by encouraging me to comfortably rethink my situation in a safe and intimate
setting. I used my experience at NYU Steinhardt where I was also offered the opportunity to
interview and offer advice to young men who have sex with men (YMSM) regarding their drug
and sexual history. I needed participants to be open with me about personal topics, and I
wanted them to feel comfortable with the suggestions I was giving about healthy lifestyle
changes that could lower risk of HIV contraction. My experience with the high school LGBT
support group gave me a good foundation of insight into their backgrounds, and I tried to
approach the subject of their sexual and drug history with confidence and sensitivity. Some
participants were open to more explicit questioning and suggestions while others were uncomfortable going into detail about their lives. Flexibility in my approach and personalizing
my interactions with each participant helped me establish more open and productive
dialogues. Once, a participant told me he had no sexual history over the past three months,
and he made a comment regarding how embarrassed he was. I joked that I could think of at
least ten different things off the top of my head that are more embarrassing in the sex
category. He laughed, and it helped establish greater openness. By the time I was speaking
about ways to prevent HIV contraction, he was asking me specific questions he had about
certain sexual activities and their associated risks.

I no longer feel like the "Blanche" of my community, and overcoming my personal struggle in
high school has affected the way that I interact with others and the activities I pursue.
Currently, I am biking across the country to connect with and raise money for others my age
with cancer. The $5,000 I've raised has given a cancer survivor the opportunity to finish the
Cancer to 5K run, which helps participants to envision a normal and healthy life after beating
the disease. I've also met face to face with many patients and family members who have
shared their experiences battling cancer with me, and each day I dedicate my bike ride to
one or more of these strangers whose stories have touched me. One patient and his wife at a
Hope Lodge have been without their daughter for six months as they seek treatment in
Michigan. They spoke about how the genuine concern of their primary physician and her
proactive involvement in all aspects of their medical experience has helped them carry
forward in an incredibly difficult situation. I look forward to using my background to provide a
caring and personalized approach that will offer patients the support that they need to
overcome their difficult situations as well.
 
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Jun 27, 2019
2
1
London
peachyessay.com
Status
MD/PhD Student
I was an applicant for med school several years ago who struggled with how to identify myself as LGBT in my application.

At the time I applied, the general vibe on SDN was that it was bad to be out on your application, and it almost definitely did not contribute to your quality as an applicant or in offering diversity to your class. I ultimately decided to be out anyway in my personal statement. Ultimately, I had a successful interview trail.

Since then, I've spoken to applicants at LGBT conferences and shared my personal statement with them. It's so easy to find personal statement examples online as a way to model your own, but unless I'm not looking in the right places there are no resources for LGBT applicants.

Therefore, I wanted to share mine with LGBT applicants as a way to offer some direction. I don't want to make it public because it's identifying and personal, but I will share the link with anyone who asks in-thread or by PM. EDIT: I posted my PS in a post below.

And also, if anyone else wants to share their personal statements in-thread or by similar means, I think this would be a great way to help out our LGBT colleagues, and feel free to post in-thread as well.

There's no one right way to do your personal statement, but I was able to be out and have a loving and incredibly supportive faculty behind me at my institution. Good luck!
So brave and empowering.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EmbryonalCarcinoma
Jul 7, 2019
1
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I'll post it here, since residency match finished and I'm not too concerned about anonymity from two cycles ago haha. It feels weird to read things I've written years ago, and rereading it now I want to tweak or change things, but i got a good amount of interviews back then so it was ultimately successful

Good luck everyone, and again anyone else feel free to post yours as well

___________________________________

Blanche Dubois stuck out to me during my first read of "Streetcar Named Desire". Her
background and identity distance everyone around her. In the final scene of the play Blanche
is taken to a psychiatric ward because no-one believes her accusations against her
brother-in-law of sexual assault. She slowly becomes the antagonist in her family and
community, which makes her vulnerable to the actions of others around her. I chose to take
on the challenge of directing the play. I wanted to place myself in Blanche's position in order
to understand why she behaves and speaks the way she does. Directing provides me training
in empathetic connection, which is necessary to develop complex and important characters. I
want to use this training in my medical career to foster honest communication and effective
lifestyle changes with my patients.

Connecting with the Blanches of the world is an interest I also pursue in my professional work.
When I entered Johns Hopkins University I reached out to the Multicultural Student Affairs
center, which referred me to work in public health at the Center for Health, Identity,
Behavior and Prevention Studies at NYU. There, I transcribed interviews of men who had
contracted HIV in the early 1980s. They spoke about specific instances where they were left
with a deep sense of isolation and neglect. One participant was fired from his position as a
nurse when his sexual behavior and illness became known to his colleagues. He lost his home
and watched his friends pass away. In order to cope with his situation he began using drugs.
He eventually met a group of other survivors who worked together to secure jobs and housing.
This group filled the huge hole that his family and community left in his life.

His story was especially poignant to me based on my own experience with my sexuality. Two
months before I graduated high school I revealed to a friend that I am gay. When I started
receiving texts and calls from strangers, I realized she told others. Someone had put my
number on Craigslist. It was very hard to go back to school every day, and I eventually came
out to my parents so that I could find a solution to the bullying. I found an LGBT group, and I
was able to talk with people who had similar experiences and challenges as me. They helped
me feel more confident entering college and connecting with the LGBT community.

I think about how despite the response I got in high school, my LGBT group did a powerful
thing for me by encouraging me to comfortably rethink my situation in a safe and intimate
setting. I used my experience at NYU Steinhardt where I was also offered the opportunity to
interview and offer advice to young men who have sex with men (YMSM) regarding their drug
and sexual history. I needed participants to be open with me about personal topics, and I
wanted them to feel comfortable with the suggestions I was giving about healthy lifestyle
changes that could lower risk of HIV contraction. My experience with the high school LGBT
support group gave me a good foundation of insight into their backgrounds, and I tried to
approach the subject of their sexual and drug history with confidence and sensitivity. Some
participants were open to more explicit questioning and suggestions while others were uncomfortable going into detail about their lives. Flexibility in my approach and personalizing
my interactions with each participant helped me establish more open and productive
dialogues. Once, a participant told me he had no sexual history over the past three months,
and he made a comment regarding how embarrassed he was. I joked that I could think of at
least ten different things off the top of my head that are more embarrassing in the sex
category. He laughed, and it helped establish greater openness. By the time I was speaking
about ways to prevent HIV contraction, he was asking me specific questions he had about
certain sexual activities and their associated risks.

I no longer feel like the "Blanche" of my community, and overcoming my personal struggle in
high school has affected the way that I interact with others and the activities I pursue.
Currently, I am biking across the country to connect with and raise money for others my age
with cancer. The $5,000 I've raised has given a cancer survivor the opportunity to finish the
Cancer to 5K run, which helps participants to envision a normal and healthy life after beating
the disease. I've also met face to face with many patients and family members who have
shared their experiences battling cancer with me, and each day I dedicate my bike ride to
one or more of these strangers whose stories have touched me. One patient and his wife at a
Hope Lodge have been without their daughter for six months as they seek treatment in
Michigan. They spoke about how the genuine concern of their primary physician and her
proactive involvement in all aspects of their medical experience has helped them carry
forward in an incredibly difficult situation. I look forward to using my background to provide a
caring and personalized approach that will offer patients the support that they need to
overcome their difficult situations as well.

Very inspiring, insightful and simple :)
 
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Reactions: EmbryonalCarcinoma