false advertising or acceptable for NP assessment?

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thisisjustatest

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Hello, All
I recently ran into someone from the same program who advertised on his website that he "specializes" in neuropsychological assessment. I know this person did not have a two-year postdoc in NP and his internship (not APA accredited) was in treatment only. This person could have gotten a 1-year postdoc with mostly assessment (I would not know for sure) but I know it would not be under a neuropsychologist. So, Can this person say they "specialize" in NP assessment?
Also, can non-neuropsychologists offer neuropsychological assessment as a service at all?

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Hello, All
I recently ran into someone from the same program who advertised on his website that he "specializes" in neuropsychological assessment. I know this person did not have a two-year postdoc in NP and his internship (not APA accredited) was in treatment only. This person could have gotten a 1-year postdoc with mostly assessment (I would not know for sure) but I know it would not be under a neuropsychologist. So, Can this person say they "specialize" in NP assessment?
Also, can non-neuropsychologists offer neuropsychological assessment as a service at all?
This is all legally determined. In most states, a licensed psychologist can legally perform any psychological services.

There are many old neuropsychologists who never completed any post docs, who call themselves neuropsychologists, or any other number of things. The HCG were invented at some point, as were APA approved internships.
 
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Yeah, these people exist everywhere. They make us look pretty good, especially in IMEs. Unfortunate for their patients, though. I just make it so that they will have a not so good time if they are ever called to depo or testify.
 
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As was said, in nearly all states, neuropsychology isn't a protected area of specialty practice. Any licensed psychologist can legally offer all services available to psychologists, depending on the state (e.g., some states may require additional training for certain things like hypnosis). It's typically up to each individual psychologist to decide what they're competent to do. I believe the same is usually true for physicians.

I know of two exceptions, although can only ever remember one: Louisiana. The second may be...Minnesota?
 
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As was said, in nearly all states, neuropsychology isn't a protected area of specialty practice. Any licensed psychologist can legally offer all services available to psychologists, depending on the state (e.g., some states may require additional training for certain things like hypnosis). It's typically up to each individual psychologist to decide what they're competent to do. I believe the same is usually true for physicians.

I know of two exceptions, although can only ever remember one: Louisiana. The second may be...Minnesota?

I don't believe so, just some vague wording around recognizing the boundaries of one's competence in certain areas.
 
I don't believe so, just some vague wording around recognizing the boundaries of one's competence in certain areas.
Sounds like most other states, then.

Maybe I only know of one exception, although could've sworn I'd heard there was a second state out there somewhere.
 
As was said, in nearly all states, neuropsychology isn't a protected area of specialty practice. Any licensed psychologist can legally offer all services available to psychologists, depending on the state (e.g., some states may require additional training for certain things like hypnosis). It's typically up to each individual psychologist to decide what they're competent to do. I believe the same is usually true for physicians.

I know of two exceptions, although can only ever remember one: Louisiana. The second may be...Minnesota?
1) Maine is another one for neuropsych.
2) Other organizations are recognized in other states (e.g. HSPP has some special status in Indiana).

Can this person say they "specialize" in NP assessment?
Also, can non-neuropsychologists offer neuropsychological assessment as a service at all?
1) So long as they are not drastically misleading the public, they can say almost anything. It's a thin line between specializing in doing something, and having specialized training in something (e.g., I specialize in being a jerk, but I'm not a jerk-psychologist).

2) Maybe you are approaching this from a bad perspective. Our practice, and the practice of other professions, are governed by licensing laws. Our professions' licensing laws have no legal authority, or standing, to dictate how other professions practice. No outside licensing agency is going to change their laws because we complain.
a. Physicians can purchase neuropsychological tests because the test manufacturers say so.
b. Physicians can bill for neuropsychological testing because the CPT codes say they can.

3) After they've gotten licensed, I wouldn't try to gatekeep
a. You won't win.
b. It doesn't affect you financially, because there is more business than anyone can handle. Have you ever heard of an area where neuropsychologists' don't have a wait list?
c. It reduces your hassles. There are always going to be some quacks. And some difficult patients are going to be drawn to them. You don't want those patients.
d. Half of it is really funny.
e. The other half ends up with the patient being referred to someone competent.
f. Our profession has decided that the proper way to handle such issues, is to act like it's junior high, and make fun of people behind their back.
g. The "secret" of neuropsychology, is that it is built on a bad foundation. If the oldies could become competent without a fellowship, then fellowship wasn't truly necessary. If the oldies couldn't become competent without fellowship, then the first neuropsychologist was a time traveler. If you start raising the question of who had a fellowship, and who didn't, then the field falls apart. But I hated fellowship.
 
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Yeah, these people exist everywhere. They make us look pretty good, especially in IMEs. Unfortunate for their patients, though. I just make it so that they will have a not so good time if they are ever called to depo or testify.
All of this. They are great for business, but not great for the field.
 
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I love when they call completely normal MoCA scores dementia and do weird interpretations of the MoCA "sub tests" to back up their misguided conclusions.

That's odd. I usually see MOCA interpreted the other way (calling dementia level scores "normal"), especially from non-neurologists.
 
That's odd. I usually see MOCA interpreted the other way (calling dementia level scores "normal"), especially from non-neurologists.

Depends, are they using the basic manual cutoffs for the MoCA, or population norms (e.g., Rosetti)? Because scores below cutoffs are commonly normal at certain ages.
 
Depends, are they using the basic manual cutoffs for the MoCA, or population norms (e.g., Rosetti)? Because scores below cutoffs are commonly normal at certain ages.

No, I am talking well below even Rosetti cutoffs and these people don't know who Rosetti is. They are using manual cutoffs and basing it on perceived impairment during a physical or sick visit (aka, he presents well so must be okay).
 
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No, I am talking well below even Rosetti cutoffs and these people don't know who Rosetti is. They are using manual cutoffs and basing it on perceived impairment during a physical or sick visit (aka, he presents well so must be okay).
Rossetti norms are meaningless, so long as the manual stands.

I could create adult nepsy norms, and it would have the same problem
 
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Rossetti norms are meaningless, so long as the manual stands.

I could create adult nepsy norms, and it would have the same problem

Great, now I am having traumatic flashbacks of administering and scoring that stupid auditory attention subtest with the colored squares.
 
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Great, now I am having traumatic flashbacks of administering and scoring that stupid auditory attention subtest with the colored squares.
Don't forget that ridiculous theory of mind test where you pretend to walk your fingers "along the wall" and them throw up your arms like a "giant tall."
 
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