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Feeling lost on rotation

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We just started our rotations and it seems like everyone on my rotation already knows how to do all the "write-ups" like admit notes, progress notes... It seems like they knew how to do it from day one. I still have to struggle to make sure I have all the parts in the notes... Is this the case everywhere or is my rotation group just really on top of it?

How long did it take everyone to get the hang of it?

Is there a handbook someone can recommend to me for learning the basics such as writing notes, orders, and what you're really supposed to put in each etc.

Also is there a book people can recommend for abbreviations, i'm so lost when it comes to them.

Thanks in advance
 

fakin' the funk

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How long did it take everyone to get the hang of it?
Around 6-8 weeks to really be helpful/proficient.

Is there a handbook someone can recommend to me for learning the basics such as writing notes, orders, and what you're really supposed to put in each etc.
How To Be A Truly Excellent Junior Medical StudentIt's...excellent

Also is there a book people can recommend for abbreviations, i'm so lost when it comes to them.
Don't be afraid to ask, no one expects you to know the lingo on the first day. The book above helps too.
 

JayneCobb

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Also is there a book people can recommend for abbreviations, i'm so lost when it comes to them.

Ask your hospital's risk management or Medical records for a list of approved abbreviations that they allow to be used in the chart.
 

Top Gun

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Is there a handbook someone can recommend to me for learning the basics such as writing notes, orders, and what you're really supposed to put in each etc.

I recommend Maxwell's. It has a lot of good info on writing H&P's and SOAP notes.
 

pillowhead

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We just started our rotations and it seems like everyone on my rotation already knows how to do all the "write-ups" like admit notes, progress notes... It seems like they knew how to do it from day one. I still have to struggle to make sure I have all the parts in the notes... Is this the case everywhere or is my rotation group just really on top of it?

How long did it take everyone to get the hang of it?

Is there a handbook someone can recommend to me for learning the basics such as writing notes, orders, and what you're really supposed to put in each etc.

Also is there a book people can recommend for abbreviations, i'm so lost when it comes to them.

Thanks in advance

NO ONE knows how to do this stuff from day one and it's totally normal to feel lost and confused at the beginning. Never hesitate to ask someone a question even if it seems like a dumb one when you're starting out (esp. if you think it could potentially affect patient care).

Check out Maxwell's. You can also buy the Washington Manual Intern Survival Guide which has some good day to day basic stuff in it, too. Just browsing through the patient's chart is helpful, too. See how the interns write their notes and try to imitate them (although at this point you should try to be a little more detailed than them if you can).
 

lord_jeebus

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When you have some down time, open up some random charts and see how others are writing their notes. This is the only resource I used for figuring out how to write anything.
 

jdh71

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Can't add too much to advice already given. It's a process which will come with time and experience.

The most important piece I think I can contribute is that, unequivically, NO, that everyone has all their crap together and you do not. It's a classic symptom of any starting third year student, that being, that you think everyone else is doing so much better than yourself or knows so much more than yourself. It's all subjective, I promise, and the personality quirks of those who make it to medical school do not help . . . you know all that obessive-compulsive perfectionism and crushing self-criticsm.

It gets better. Medical schools manage to graduate thousands of people just like you every year.
 

Feli

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... It's a classic symptom of any starting third year student, that being, that you think everyone else is doing so much better than yourself or knows so much more than yourself...
I agree.^ A lot of people struggle with confidence. They assume their clinic peers are way ahead of them just because the other guys are faking or hiding it better :laugh:

I think Maxwell's Pocket Med is ok but too basic for notes (although great for lab values). Washington Manual is a nice desk reference but way too big and in depth to carry in clinic. Truly Excellent JMS has about the right amount of detail and plenty of other good content also. It's probably your best bet as downtime reading or to find the format of a note you forgot how to write; I read it before 3rd year but find myself going back and referencing it fairly frequently.
 

Dr McSteamy

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I agree.^ A lot of people struggle with confidence. They assume their clinic peers are way ahead of them just because the other guys are faking or hiding it better :laugh:

haha. so true.
But I fake it so that I'm more likely to be left alone.


The frustrating thing about learning by example (e.g reading charts) is that 99% of the docs' and res' handwriting sucks! I can't read chit!! WTF illegible.
I'm afraid I'm gonna have trouble managing patients in later years because I won't be able to read the sloppy handwriting.


Occasionally, I come across a resident's note which he took time to TYPE, and I learn a little. I appreciate that a lot.
 
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