Fellow Canadian DO students ?

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Canadiangirl, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering if there's any Canadians out there recently accepted to a US DO school. I thought we might want discuss the whole matriculation process into the US DO school. I feel like I'm still in the dark here, and is a little anxious because I don't really understand the whole process. please help
     
  2. thatuvicguy

    thatuvicguy Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2004
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hey there,

    I was accepted to DMU last year but ended up at a Canadian school instead. Where are you headed? Let me know if I can be of any help.

    Cheers,
    thatuvicguy

     
  3. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hey TuvicG,

    You still around? Good to see you get sometime to breath.

    BTW, I am accepted to US DO school. Now I just sit and wait for Canadian applications to get back to me. If no luck.. I will matriculate at UNECOM. Assuming I can dig up some money from somewhere.

    What school did you get into to?

    docbill (maybe the DOcbill stands for DO.... I had this nic name for over 14 years... forshadowing...maybe.
     
  4. AliatUofT

    AliatUofT Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2004
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey Bill

    whatz up buddy.. how are u doing, hope you are doing well,
    so is the PhD done yet?
    i see you stuck around for one more shot, i really wish it will work out for you this year, you deserve it

    best of luck
    take care

    Ali



     
  5. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hey Ali, Nice to see you are surviving as well. Wow... two people who where in my situation this time last year. You guys made it. How is O treating you?

    PhD is going really well and will be done this summer with the defence. But you never know what happens between now and then. I applied to UofT and UBC, now just wait and wait.

    Thanks for the motivation man. Let me know how its going in first year. Did the novelty wear off or not yet. It must be so much better than the confussion and dramma in grad school.

    Best,
    B
     
  6. BlondeCookie

    BlondeCookie Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    427
    Likes Received:
    0
    DO? ewe groce. Why not just up your scores and reapply?

    Or if you're going to leave the greatest country on Earth (oh Canada!) why not get an MBBS or MBBCh? Both of these degrees are the equivalent to the MD designation used in North America. In the Commonwealth countries, the MBBS or MBBCh confers the same thing for Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery. You have all the same practice rights of an MD since it is the equivalent of an MD.
     
  7. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    First of all, I'm going to an Osteopathic medical school not because I can not get into a MD school, or that I'm just too lazy. I applied only to osteopathic medical schools and no MD schools because I truly believe in its philosophy. DO school provides excellent training for primary care and preventative care, in addition it provides an excellent holistic approach on illnesses. DO on average spends more time with his/her patients and establishes excellent long term relationships, which again contribute to the quality of primary care. I feel osteopathic medicine will provide me with the education that I will need to become the type of doctor I want to become, despite the letters after my name. I understand you may not choose to become a DO yourself, especially if you have no interest in primary care, but I'd appreciate it if you respect the profession because I truly believe it's an excellent system for training primary care physicians and providing excellent care.

    Thank you for your advices on MBBS and MBBch. I'd just like to add that DOs also have full practice rights anywhere in the states (completely equivalent to MDs, as a matter of fact, DO can bill for OMT in addition to all the procedures MDs can bill) and several provices in Canada (ontario, Alberta, there's more, but I need to do more research on that). There's such a great shortage for primary care physicians, so it's not like I will have any problems practicing once I graduate.

    just out of curiosity, why is DO "groce", did you have some bad previous experiences with a DO in Canada?
     
  8. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    That said, I wish there is a Canadian DO school, so I didn't have to leave home and this country... :(

    nevertheless, leaving means lots of headaches and worryings...anyone who's most likely going to matriculate in a US Do school here? Anyone familiar with this process at all? Canadians already in DO schools? help
     
  9. mkmgal

    mkmgal Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    DOcbill,

    I'm a 4th year DO student at AZCOM (Canadian citizen but raised in the states) and am considering returning to Alberta (where my wife's from) at some point in the future. I've seen a lot of your posts over time, and it appears you have a good handle on how to make the DO-to-Canada transition.

    I've read that Ontario now recognizes the USMLE and COMLEX. Have you heard of any other provinces following suite (ie: Alberta)? Is it true that DO's, unlike American-trained MDs, are considered/treated like IMGs in Canada and must take the MCCQE...in addition to the MCCEE? Despite the many loopholes, are you aware of any DO students planning on practicing in Canada?

    I'm starting to see more pluses to practicing in Canada as the HMO and malpractice climate change for the worse in the states. I spent the month of October doing rural FP in Southern Alberta, in my wife's home town, and it seemed like the physicians had greater job-satisfaction than most docs in the states. I think that says a lot. True, there seem to be significant waits and other setbacks, but it seems like a fairly good system, albeit not perfect.

    I know there are some misunderstandings and perhaps disrespect for DOs by some, but I love going to a DO school, and I love what I do. I think it's excellent medicine and patient care. What a great tool are OMT and OPP! (I hope I don't sound arrogant or preachy). And, BTW, the FP group I rotated with said I was "above average" compared to other students they have received from the UofA and UofC, and they appreciated the added tool of OMT once they observed it...so I don't think us crazy DOs are too off base. Anyway, look forward to hearing from you...
     
  10. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hey Mcmgl, I will respond your message by IM. In more details and will give you a couple of peoples names to contact. They are practicing DO in Alberta and ON. If you have not talked to them, you should.

    Also please note for DO's getting license to practice in Ontario, that is a new change and requires new USMLEs and not the old one.

    Please send me IM, that way I can get you that info.

    BTW. DO is a great option. In my head it is equal to MD, BMMS, etc.... sure you train for OMM... but I bet you there is little difference the way a DO patient's body and an MD's patient's body works.... also there are no difference in treatment in the ER.
     
  11. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi DocBill

    Can I have the names of the DOs who are currently practicing in Alberta and Ontario? I heard BC is moving towards accepting osteopathic medicine. Is this true?
     
  12. BlondeCookie

    BlondeCookie Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    427
    Likes Received:
    0


    Well ok. I didn't mean to offend. Yes, I had some bad experiences with DO, but let's not go there. I understand that they can be very competent docs and since you say you are interested in holistic care and possibly living in the US, then DO may be the way to go for you. Just keep in mind that if you want to return to Canada, you won't have full practice rights as a DO in many provinces. In the USA, I think you have full practice rights as a DO.
     
  13. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    you do have full medical license in at least BC, Alberta, ON and QC (those are the ones I would be interested in. Also if you have license to work in Maine, you can work in NB, NO EXAMS NOTHING. Exchange program for health care prof between the two states/provinces.

    PS. I am busy now, but I will reply to request later. Presently in BC, Dr.Church has been working as a FP for the last 10 -15- so years. Ask UVicGuy he knows more details prob.
     
  14. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm sorry that you had some negative experiences with DOs in the past.
    No offence taken, thanks for the advice, hope you will keep an open mind. thanks :)
     
  15. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    but Dr.Ted Findley is the president of the Canadian Osteopathic Association (AKA US trained DOs). Just google him and you should find his email address.

    It is also listed on AOA- [email protected]
     
  16. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Maybe NewCanadian might know more info on DO licensing in Canada.
     
  17. cansnowflake

    cansnowflake Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2005
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just out of curiosity, would a Canadian DO graduate be eligible for the first round of CaRMS???? (if anyone happens to know)

    Thanks!
     
  18. xylem29

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,171
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Dental Student
    I was checking out some info on DO's and from what I've read - it appears that a DO degree is essentially equivalent to an MD degree ONLY in the USA. DO's in Canada and elsewhere however, do not practice medicine as MD's but engage in things like alternative, rehab, and preventative medicine (like ND's, chiroprators, etc.) that's what I read - if anyone has actual proof that you can practice medicine in ON with a DO degree from US, please provide me with the link to the site of the governining body that states this (other than the ammacon i have not seen a similar organization in canada) - b/c I am really interested in the DO perspective but if I can't practice med in ON, then forget it!
     
  19. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    You can practice in Canada as MDs.

    Canada

    Listed below are the licensure requirements for US-trained D.O.s in the provinces and territories of Canada. All the provinces that have provisions for licensing D.O.s as physicians require that D.O.s be graduates of AOA-accredited osteopathic medical colleges and they be or intend to become Canadian citizens. For the provinces or territories that state, “no provisions exist for licensing US-trained D.O.s,” it is suggested the individual contact that regulatory authority. While there may not be a provision, the regulatory agency may consider amending its current policy to include recognition of US-trained D.O.s.

    Alberta

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: Must have completed at least 2 years of GME accredited by the ACGME or AOA and must have passed the Universities Coordinating Council Exam, a basic sciences exam, and have passed all three parts of the licensing examination of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC).

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta
    900 Manulife Place
    10180-101 Street
    Edmonton Alberta T5J 4P8
    CANADA
    (780) 423-4764
    www.cpsa.ab.ca

    British Columbia

    Scope of Practice: one licensure pathway provides D.O.s with unlimited practice rights, and another pathway limits D.O.s to practice OMM
    Requirements: To be eligible for unlimited licenses: must have completed at least one year of GME approved by the AOA or the ACGME, completed at least 1 year of GME in Canada, passed all three parts of the LMCC. For licenses limited to OMM: must have completed at least 2 years of AOA approved GME and passed all three parts of the NBOME or COMLEX.

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia
    1807 W. 10th Avenue
    Vancouver British Columbia V6J 2A9
    CANADA
    (604) 733-7758
    cpsbc.bc.ca

    Manitoba

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: In 2002, the College voted to register U.S.-educated and trained DOs.

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba
    1000-1661 Portage Avenue
    Winnipeg Manitoba R3J 3T7
    CANADA
    (204) 774-4344
    www.cpsm.mb.ca

    New Brunswick

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: Must have completed at least 2 years of GME approved by the AOA or the ACGME and have passed all three parts of the LMCC. There is also a reciprocity pathway for D.O.s holding a license to practice medicine in Maine.

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick
    1 Hampton Road, Suite 200
    Rothesay, New Brunswick E2E 5K8
    CANADA
    (506) 849-5050
    cpsnb.org

    Newfoundland

    Scope of Practice to be determined
    Requirements: in 2002, the College committed itself to seeing that the government establishes a registration pathway for U.S.-educated D.O.s. It is anticipated that establishing guidelines may take a couple of years.

    Contact: Newfoundland Medical Board
    139 Water Street, Suite 603
    St. John’s Newfoundland A1C 1B2
    CANADA
    (709) 726-8546

    Northwest Territories

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: While no specific provisions are in place, the AOA has been told the government will grant
    registration to any physician that qualifies for licensure in any other province.

    Contact: Government of the Northwest Territories
    Centre Square Tower 8th Floor
    Yellowknife NWT X1A 2L9
    CANADA
    (867) 920-8058

    Nova Scotia

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    A new regulation was put into effect in 2002 to recognize U.S.-educated osteopathic physicians.

    Contact: Provincial Medical Board of Nova Scotia
    Sentry Place
    1559 Brunswick Street, Suite 200
    Halifax Nova Scotia B3J 2G1
    CANADA
    (902) 422-5823
    www.cpsns.ns.ca

    Ontario

    Scope of Practice: Unlimited
    In 2002, the Premier of Ontario and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) announced that changes were being implemented to recognize international medical graduates, including D.O.s who are now recognizing by the CPSO. In addition, the CPSO has created a Fast Track Assessment Program for international medical graduates who wish to practice in Ontario. The Fast Track Assessment is an expedited process designed for doctors with experience. It focuses on an evaluation of practice skills and can be tailored to the individual applicant. By evaluating the practice skills of the individual doctor rather than looking at the grades and training programs, the College acquires a more realistic view of the abilities of the individual physicians. For more recent graduates, there is the Standard Assessment process. It concentrates on examination grades and completion of an approved course of education and residency. All candidates are assessed in the same way. For more information on Ontario’s registration, go to
    www.cpso.on.ca/info_physi...egist.htm.

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
    80 College Street
    Toronto Ontario M5G 2E2
    CANADA
    (416) 967-2600
    www.cpso.on.ca

    Prince Edward Island
    Scope of Practice: no provisions exist for licensing US-trained D.O.s

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of Prince Edward Island
    199 Grafton Street
    Charlottetown, PEI C1A 1L2
    CANADA
    (902) 566-3861

    Quebec

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: Must have completed at least 1 year of GME approved by the AOA or the ACGME, must have completed at least 1 year of GME in Quebec, passed the written, oral and clinical board examination of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and must speak French fluently.

    Contact: College des Medecins du Quebec
    2170 Rene-Levesque Blvd West
    Montreal Quebec H3H 2T8
    CANADA
    (514) 933-4441
    www.cmq.org

    Saskatchewan

    Scope of Practice: limited to OMM
    Requirements: Must have completed at least 1 year of AOA-approved GME.

    Contact: College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan
    211 Fourth Avenue South
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 1N1
    CANADA
    (306) 244-7355
    www.quadrant.net/cpss

    Yukon Territory

    Scope of Practice: unlimited
    Requirements: While no specific provisions are in place, the AOA has been told the government will grant
    registration to any physician that qualifies for licensure in any other province.

    Contact: Government of the Yukon
    PO Box 2703
    Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C
    CANADA
    (867) 667-5257
     
  20. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
  21. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Check your facts properly.

    You are thinking of british d.o. degrees which are offered by the Canadian College of Osteopathy. Limiting practice to Osteopathic Manipulation (OMM).

    As a US trained DO, you can match in CaRMs first round for FP in Ontario.
    In Alberta, you can match in second round, for more then just FP.
    If you do your specialization in the US, doing a USMLE residency you can practice in most of Canada.
     
  22. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    From :

    http://72.14.207.104/search?q=cache:N3JV79b1kFEJ:www.carms.ca/jsp/main.jsp%3Fpath%3D../content/program/restriction+CARMS+Osteopathic&hl=en

    THIS IS BEFORE THE EQUIVALENCE EXAMS WAS ACCEPTED

    Restrictions in Ontario

    Prior Year Graduates
    Eligibility for the Second Iteration of the 2004 CaRMS Match includes prior year graduates with postgraduate training. In the 2004 match, unlicensed graduates of LCME/CACMS accredited schools with any previous accredited and/or creditable postgraduate medical training are eligible for the CaRMS second iteration in Ontario. This includes unlicensed graduates of LCME/CACMS accredited schools who are currently in training or have exited training, but are not eligible for an independent license.


    Re-entry
    In Ontario, fully licensed physicians (both graduates of LCME/CACMS accredited schools and foreign medical schools) are not eligible for inclusion in the CaRMS match, since Ontario provides no re-entry opportunities through the CaRMS match.


    Doctor of Osteopathy
    A Doctor of Osteopathy who has graduated from a school of osteopathic medicine accredited by the Bureau of Professional Education of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) is eligible for registration in the first and second iteration of the CaRMS match for Family Medicine postgraduate education programs in Ontario if he/she is a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant. Note: graduates of schools of osteopathic medicine must write and pass the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) prior to being eligible to write the MCC Qualifying Exams Parts I and II AND PRIOR TO BEING ELIGIBLE TO APPLY TO CaRMS.
     
  23. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
  24. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
  25. xylem29

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,171
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Dental Student
    Hey thanks man! This is good news to me. Options are unlimited now...
     
  26. mkmgal

    mkmgal Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sorry to back track a little. Yes, I've been in contact with Dr. Findlay quite a few times over the last 2-3 years, and he's been a great resource. I'm returning to Alberta for Christmas and hoping to meet up with him at some point during my visit. Anyway, I know he has full, unlimited practice rights in Alberta. Due to high demand, I think most of his new patients are for OMT only. Anyway, maybe I can write more when I have time. Thanks!
     
  27. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I just wish to add. That this is not easy. Anything other then Canadian MD degree is difficult and requires lots of red tap and jumping hoops. US MD degree is easier than DO degree. DO degree is much easier then IMG.

    But as a future physician you should be able to work out the details when you have to. Plus we are not the first one doing this path. So we don't have to plan out everyday of our life for the next 10 years. Things change, plans change, things work out.
     
  28. cansnowflake

    cansnowflake Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2005
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the info! It is definately something worth looking into.
     
  29. NewCanadian

    NewCanadian CdnNurse (ret.)
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    15
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    DocBill
    You just about covered it. I have nothing to add right now.
     
  30. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    DocBill You ROCK! :thumbup:
     
  31. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Thanks I try.. but usually things are so busy I roll.
     
  32. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    http://www.caribbeanmedicine.com/openletter.htm

    I was looking into getting into residency programs and I came across this article above, I'm kinda concerned now about getting into an residency program in the USA after graduating from a US school. Apparently, people waited up to 2 years just to get their visas so they can start their residency. Is this accurate information? DocBill? Help! :confused:
     
  33. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    NO you don't have to worry about this.

    2 years is rediculous. Look up the visa requirements at US government ambassy website. As a graduate of US school and a Canadian, you should not wait this long.

    The problem is finding a place that will offer you H1b visa. Few places offer this since it requires more work. But J1 visa is fairly easy.

    Canadiangirl. Just jump through one hoop at a time... and don't be so concerned all the time what will happen 4 years down the road. You are not the first to do it and there is a proceedure for everything. When we don't know something we become fearful. But once you know how things work.. visa etc... you will be just fine.

    PS. I plan to get US residency if I do med in the US.
     
  34. JJcandy

    JJcandy Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Few US residency programs offer H1-b Visa? Does that mean it's harder for canadian students to compete for competitive residencies?
     
  35. Canadiangirl

    Canadiangirl Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi DocBill, thank once again for the quick response and reassurance. I do agree that I tends to worry ALOT in advance, I'll calm down and breath properly now..lol..I guess since few places offer H1-B visa, our choices as canadian students will be limited compared to US students. Hopefully, that'll change somewhat in the next 4 years.... :luck:
     
  36. docbill

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hi Cana-Girl

    Yes, I don't know if it will change in the next few years... but think about it this way. You can get a J1 and then come back and work in Canada for 2 years.

    For H1b visa intro:

    http://www.workpermit.com/us/employer_h-1b.htm

    I don't know if we can apply for this one. It would be interesting to know. Mooo where are you????

    TN1 visa:

    http://www.workpermit.com/us/employer_tn.htm


    Here is an interesting site.

    http://www.mdgreencard.com/h_visa_medical.html#1

    3. What is involved in H1B sponsorship? Do all residency/fellowship programs participate?

    From the employer side, H1B sponsorship is quite easy. They simply sign sponsorship paperwork and post a Dept. of Labor form which verifies that the wage offered to the foreign medical resident is at least 95% of the prevailing wage for the employer.

    About 75% of residency/fellowship programs agree to H1B sponsorship. Most of the other 25% of the programs who refuse to participate do so due to lack of knowledge concerning the H1B visa application process or due to an obscure university/hospital policy requiring residents/fellows to obtain J1 visas. Even so, We have found that even at institutions with a strict J1 only policy, sponsorship of certain medical residents/fellows for H1B visas has been possible.

    From AAMC

    http://www.aamc.org/advocacy/library/workforce/work0004.htm
     

Share This Page