Nov 19, 2010
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Psychology Student
Hi everybody!

I've been spending a lot of time lately learning about the Psychology programs offered at many of the Universities across California and have noticed that most of the Top schools (Cal, Sanford, UCLA, UCSD) emphasize research in their programs and not clinical training. Here is a piece from UCLA's website:

All areas of the Ph.D. program are research-oriented; the Department's aim is to train researchers dedicated to increasing the body of scientific knowledge upon which the discipline of psychology rests. This applies to the Clinical area as well: although this area offers excellent clinical training, the emphasis lies in research, not in training private
practitioners.


If this is the pattern of throughout most California Universities, then where does someone get in degree if they want to be a clinical psychologist?

This actually brings me to my next question: What is the difference between a clinical psychologist and a counseling psychologist? I always thought they were the same thing.

Thanks
 

AcronymAllergy

Neuropsychologist
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Jan 7, 2010
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Psychologist
Hi everybody!

I've been spending a lot of time lately learning about the Psychology programs offered at many of the Universities across California and have noticed that most of the Top schools (Cal, Sanford, UCLA, UCSD) emphasize research in their programs and not clinical training. Here is a piece from UCLA's website:

All areas of the Ph.D. program are research-oriented; the Department's aim is to train researchers dedicated to increasing the body of scientific knowledge upon which the discipline of psychology rests. This applies to the Clinical area as well: although this area offers excellent clinical training, the emphasis lies in research, not in training private
practitioners.


If this is the pattern of throughout most California Universities, then where does someone get in degree if they want to be a clinical psychologist?

This actually brings me to my next question: What is the difference between a clinical psychologist and a counseling psychologist? I always thought they were the same thing.

Thanks
If you search the forums for "clinical vs. counseling psychology," or something similar, you'll likely turn up a large number of very helpful and informative threads on the topic.

As for your first question--even if an individual receives predominantly research-oriented training, if their degree is in clinical psychology, then they are still a clinical psychologist. Thus, if they so chose, they could "hang a shingle" and see clients (assuming they were licensed). If one is interested in clinical work exclusively, then in California, you could attend one of the many professional schools and/or pursue a Psy.D.

Keep in mind, though, that all clinical psychologists are (theoretically) scientists, and thus all are trained (to varying degrees) in how to conduct and consume research. Even in less research-intensive Ph.D. programs, your time will be split approximately 50/50 between research and clinical work.
 

docma

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Oct 27, 2007
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In the UC system Santa Barbara has the strongest practice orientation (but research is also integral). UCB's developmental program can also support a practice career but you might need to get your clinical licensure hours post-doctorally because the program is not organized around clinical/psychopathology focus but more on the processes of human development. Counseling psychology tends to have a this broader scope as well, but if you seek clinical training in acute care/serious psychopathology you can usually get it in Counseling Psych programs and be qualified for jobs across domains (eg: degree is in Counseling Psych but you can be qualified for clinical psychology positions)
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
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Apr 6, 2007
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All those schools with the exception of Stanford (who's program is experimental psychopathology research) WILL prepare you to be a clinical psychologist-The program will just have heavy research components. But again, the majority of people coming from even heavy research programs will pursue careers more oriented towards practice. They have to, academic careers are competitive and simply not that plentiful. There is no shortage of Psy.D. programs in the state of California though. Pepperdine has a good rep, as does the PGSP-Stanford Consortium, although their price tag makes the program much less appealing in many peoples eyes.
 
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