SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

Flow Cytometry Question

Discussion in 'Student Research and Publishing' started by bioislife, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. SDN is made possible through member donations, sponsorships, and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. bioislife

    bioislife

    28
    7
    May 31, 2016
    Hey guys,

    Not sure if this is even the right place to post but I have a question.

    I'm brand new to flow cytometry so I was going over the protocol in lab today and doing an experiment. I just have a question. Why is it important to add the buffer that basically "kidnaps" the calcium in the solution? Not even sure if that makes sense but what's the significance of calcium in all of this?

    I hope my question makes sense! Look forward to hearing what you guys think
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. bioislife

    bioislife

    28
    7
    May 31, 2016
    Update: so I meant to write using a buffer with EDTA. So I researched and found an answer: it's important because cells contain cadherins, so cells will want to bind to each other. Cadherins are activated by Ca2+, so by chelating the calcium ions we essentially prevent cell-cell binding and have smooth flow cytometry!
     

Share This Page