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Oct 16, 2005
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What do you like most about your career? And what do you dislike most?
 

SimulD

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Apr 22, 2001
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I hate checking port films, OBIs, CBCTs.

I like everything else.
S
 

medgator

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Sep 20, 2004
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I hate checking port films, OBIs, CBCTs.

I like everything else.
S
I don't mind checking those so much, now with EPID and IGRT.

But man I used to hate checking old-fashioned ports when we still had a non-IGRT, non-epid LINAC.
 

wagy27

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Mar 15, 2007
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I love the patient interaction (with a few exceptions), the physics, and the planning

What I'm not a fan of...the Rad bio and of course...port films
 

radonc

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nothing is wrong with checking port films. while it is somewhat tedious, it is an important part of the daily treatment.
 

Palex80

RAD ON
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Dec 17, 2007
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I hate having to bring bad news to parents of children, which are under treatment.

Other than that paediatric radonc is cool.
 

SimulD

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Okay, after getting used to new port films system, it is no longer as bad. But, still the worst thing about rad onc. I also don't like being a tertiary referral and completely dependent on medical oncologists and surgeons.

-S
 

OTN

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Nov 6, 2003
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These are all pretty "me" specific, but I guess I can't say for anyone else, so here goes...

Pros:
- Cancer treatment is fascinating, interesting, ever-changing, and truly multidisciplinary. Never, ever going to get bored in this field.
- Treating an illness (cancer) that represents a significant challenge/event in pt's lives. No family members falling asleep in consult rooms here. The pts are almost always truly grateful.
- Using a treatment modality which changes with technological advancement. I've always been kind of a gadget/computer-type guy, so I love this stuff. Plus, I actually enjoy using the multiple computer systems to which we are exposed: Pinnacle (ADAC), Eclipse, Impaq, etc.
- No in-house call, no weekends (as long as you get your work done during the week, that is)
- Good reimbursement (even if-when- reimbursements drop, we're still coming from a pretty high place already, so I feel confident things will be fine for me and mine)
- Using a treatment with a definite endpoint: i.e. the pt comes in with x, we use y to try and achieve z goal. Chronic disease management isn't my thing.
- Not having to deal (as much) with diagnosis. Puzzles were never my thing either.
- We are some of the very few docs who actually see all types of pts: from peds to adult to gyn and all in between. How many specialities other than Ob/Gyn really know how to do a pelvic exam?
- Not having to do a fellowship. This is NICE.

Cons:
- Getting into residency is a royal PITA.
- As mentioned before, we're at the end of the referral chain. Comes with being so specialized, but it does mean you have to make sure you know where your referrals are coming from. In some regions, competition between radoncs can be pretty intense- and I'm not alll about "let's make gift baskets for the referring medical oncologists." I don't want to feel like a realtor. Your choice in job can help minimize this problem, though.
- Some days can be downers, to be sure. Not all, but some.
- Finally, and least importantly, learning to live with the fear that someday there will be a non-RT cancer "cure" that suddenly makes us obsolete. Do I think this is even a possibiltiy? No. Does it keep me awake at night? No. Would I be mad if this happened? Not at all. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few*.

T

p.s. Movie quote. Source, anyone? Googling it = cheating. ;)
 

DrJD

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 24, 2005
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These are all pretty "me" specific, but I guess I can't say for anyone else, so here goes...

Pros:
- Cancer treatment is fascinating, interesting, ever-changing, and truly multidisciplinary. Never, ever going to get bored in this field.
- Treating an illness (cancer) that represents a significant challenge/event in pt's lives. No family members falling asleep in consult rooms here. The pts are almost always truly grateful.
- Using a treatment modality which changes with technological advancement. I've always been kind of a gadget/computer-type guy, so I love this stuff. Plus, I actually enjoy using the multiple computer systems to which we are exposed: Pinnacle (ADAC), Eclipse, Impaq, etc.
- No in-house call, no weekends (as long as you get your work done during the week, that is)
- Good reimbursement (even if-when- reimbursements drop, we're still coming from a pretty high place already, so I feel confident things will be fine for me and mine)
- Using a treatment with a definite endpoint: i.e. the pt comes in with x, we use y to try and achieve z goal. Chronic disease management isn't my thing.
- Not having to deal (as much) with diagnosis. Puzzles were never my thing either.
- We are some of the very few docs who actually see all types of pts: from peds to adult to gyn and all in between. How many specialities other than Ob/Gyn really know how to do a pelvic exam?
- Not having to do a fellowship. This is NICE.

Cons:
- Getting into residency is a royal PITA.
- As mentioned before, we're at the end of the referral chain. Comes with being so specialized, but it does mean you have to make sure you know where your referrals are coming from. In some regions, competition between radoncs can be pretty intense- and I'm not alll about "let's make gift baskets for the referring medical oncologists." I don't want to feel like a realtor. Your choice in job can help minimize this problem, though.
- Some days can be downers, to be sure. Not all, but some.
- Finally, and least importantly, learning to live with the fear that someday there will be a non-RT cancer "cure" that suddenly makes us obsolete. Do I think this is even a possibiltiy? No. Does it keep me awake at night? No. Would I be mad if this happened? Not at all. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few*.

T

p.s. Movie quote. Source, anyone? Googling it = cheating. ;)
Plus two points for quoting Spock :) At least thats what I'm guessing...