For step 1 studying, what resources do you use when you are clueless about a concept?

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taeyeonlover

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MS2 here. I was casually browsing through First Aid today and realized that I was clueless on a lot of the concepts especially physiology. In cases like this where I do not have a good understanding of certain concepts during step 1 studying, what resources should I use to teach myself the material? Do I do it the hard way and go back to my school notes/lectures? Do I just use board prep materials that teach you the concepts you became rusty on?

First aid seems great but it feels more like an outline of facts to know for the exam so I am just wondering.

I didn't do well in my first year classes so even though the exam is pf, I would like to start studying early so that I don't have any regrets later on.

Would appreciate any advice!

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I was middle of the road on step for what its worth. If you just want a "decent" score take my advice, otherwise go for someone whose like insane/brilliant. But here is my $0.02:

UWorld question explanations are very high caliber! I don't think anyone will disagree. First Aid and Pathoma are the gold standard beyond that.

If you can't get it out of any of these resources, and its that complex, there are probably other simple, high-yield concepts you could be solidifying instead. There is an opportunity cost to going this deep into the weeds.
 
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The usual outside resources that are recommended (B&B, Pathoma) will do the job. Textbooks are becoming outdated, but Physiology by Linda Costanzo is great if you're weak in that specifically and want to take a deeper dive.
 
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The usual outside resources that are recommended (B&B, Pathoma) will do the job. Textbooks are becoming outdated, but Physiology by Linda Costanzo is great if you're weak in that specifically and want to take a deeper dive.
Does BNB teach you well every concept covered in First Aid? Like if I am really lacking foundation in certain areas, should I go straight to BNB to learn the material?
 
BnB has great videos. I didn't use them for more than a couple days but their videos seemed well made and pretty comprehensive. Probably not great for a first learning experience but excellent for any review after that.
 
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BnB has great videos. I didn't use them for more than a couple days but their videos seemed well made and pretty comprehensive. Probably not great for a first learning experience but excellent for any review after that.
I used them almost exclusively for primary learning and they worked great.
 
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Costanzo for physiology is the best. It's concise, excellent, and will actually teach you physiology instead of just memorizing if -> thens.
 
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In addition to all the fantastic advice above, Wikipedia can be surprisingly helpful to make sense of the minutia as well. E.g. Why does Drug X have effects on Y and Z receptors but not on A' etc. ?
 
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In addition to all the fantastic advice above, Wikipedia can be surprisingly helpful to make sense of the minutia as well. E.g. Why does Drug X have effects on Y and Z receptors but not on A' etc. ?

Wiki can be great but frankly I feel uncomfortable using it as a resource to learn medicine. It just lacks credibility and I CBA to read through the citations for verification.
 
For physiology I really liked Costanzo, it was just about the only book (pdf) that I opened other than first aid. Ninja Nerd on YouTube was also really helpful for some concepts. And of course the u world explanations.
 
Does BNB teach you well every concept covered in First Aid? Like if I am really lacking foundation in certain areas, should I go straight to BNB to learn the material?

For me it was pretty comprehensive. Anything more detailed you can always look up on Wikipedia, Pubmed, Uptodate, or even certain YouTube videos.
 
Wiki can be great but frankly I feel uncomfortable using it as a resource to learn medicine. It just lacks credibility and I CBA to read through the citations for verification.
As with anything it depends on how you’re using it. If you’re writing a textbook then don’t cite Wikipedia as a source of primary literature. If you’re trying to remember how chlorophyll converts sunlight into available bioenergy the Wikipedia can help.
 
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